One Space Left on REEF Trip to Honduras

The MV Caribbean Pearl II

We have one male share spot left on our REEF Trip to Honduras in June. Join us on this great dive vacation aboard the luxurious liveaboard MV Caribbean Pearl II! Dates are June 21 - 28. We will explore Utila, Roatan, and the banks in between. This special trip is led by two marine biologists, and we hear that whale sharks could be seen! To find out more, visit http://www.REEF.org/node/8679

Other 2014 REEF trips with spaces remaining include: Hornby Island British Columbia in September, Cayman Brac in September, and Nevis in December. We have also added a trip to Fiji in May 2015 (more 2015 trips coming soon). REEF Field Survey Trips are a great introduction to fish identification for novice fishwatchers, and a fun way for experienced surveyors to build their life list while interacting with fellow fishwatchers. Prices and complete details can be found online at www.REEF.org/trips. To find out more about any of these trips or to book your space, contact our travel consultants at Caradonna at 1-877-295-7333 (REEF), REEF@caradonna.com, or our staff at REEF HQ at 305-852-0030, trips@REEF.org.

Publication Date: 
04/30/2014

Putting It to Work: REEF Data on Cabezon Used by Washington State Agency

Cabezon. Photo by Steve Lonhart/NOAA.

Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission are currently reviewing existing size limits, bag limits, and fishing season for cabezon in Puget Sound waters. Cabezon are bottomfish that inhabit rocky areas. They can measure up to 30-inches and weigh up to 25 pounds. REEF data from the Puget Sound, representing 11,646 individual survey from 427 sites throughout the region, were used as part of the Commission's review to identify trends in cabezon abundance in Puget Sound. WDFW researcher, Dayv Lowry, conducted the analysis. According to the REEF data, there is a decreasing trend in the frequency of detection of cabezon between 1998 and 2012. This trend is most pronounced in the central Sound from Seattle to Tacoma. The majority (81%) of cabezon sightings in the REEF database are from Edmonds Underwater Park, a long-time marine reserve north of Seattle. At Edmonds, cabezon appear to have decreased sharply since 1998. These findings were included in a report submitted the Commission (report available online here). Earlier this year, the Commission voted to reduce the daily catch limit of cabezon to one fish and prohibit the retention of cabezon measuring less than 18 inches in length. They are currently reviewing the fishing season length and are meeting in June.

The Faces of REEF: Mike Delaney

Mike hitting the books during the 2012 REEF Trip to Hornby Island.
Mike (left) at The Edge Diving, a REEF Field Station.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Mike Delaney, one of REEF's earliest Pacific Northwest volunteers. Mike has been a REEF member since 1999, and has conducted 433 surveys. He is a member of the PAC Advanced Assessment Team, and he has the distinction of conducting the 20,000th REEF survey in the Pacific region back in 2011 (see story). Here's what Mike had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF or become a REEF member? How did you first hear about REEF?

I heard about REEF through the Living Oceans Society’s Living Reef Project. I began my training course with Susan Francis and Dana Haggarty in 1999 and I was part of the LOS’s pilot PNW Invertebrate Survey Project. To improve my identification skills of PNW species, I was mentored by Donna Gibbs and Andy Lamb of the Vancouver Aquarium. In an effort to gain more buddies to survey with, I began organizing Great Annual Fish Counts and teaching the REEF curriculum. Fish watching, conducting surveys, and REEF became a passion.

If you have been on a REEF Field Survey, where and what was your trip highlight?

I had the opportunity to visit one of my favorite dive destinations Hornby Island and take part in the 2012 Field Survey lead by Janna Nichols and hosted by Hornby Island Diving . I have been to Hornby Island numerous times, and it is always a treat because it offers a great variety of marine life. During the trip, the group was able to dive a site that is not visited frequently and was inhabited by large schools of rockfish, lingcod, cabezon and colourful invertebrate life that adorns the sandstone walls. Another great thing about REEF is the ability to learn and survey in other regions, whether it is a REEF trip or not. I have had the opportunity to complete surveys in the TWA and in the TEP!

In your opinion, what is the most important aspect of REEF’s projects and programs?

The concept of scuba divers as citizen scientists is inspiring. As an individual we can contribute to a greater good: the understanding of the ocean and its inhabitants! As ocean explorers we can collect data and know that the information collected is being used to support science initiatives to protect the oceans.

Do you dive close to where you live, and if so, what is the best part about diving there? 

In Vancouver we are fortunate to have numerous local dive sites to visit and most of my surveys are completed in the rich emerald waters of British Columbia. One of my frequented dive sites is Whytecliff Park and I had the unexpected surprise of completing the 20.000th PNW survey at the same site in which I conducted my very first REEF survey! Whytecliff is a great site because you never know what critters you might come across. Whytecliff Park offers wall diving with lots of sponges and a sandy bay with eel grass beds for poking around on your safety stop.

Do you have a favorite local (or not) REEF field station or dive shop?

In 2006 I began working at The Edge Diving Centre, which was quickly registered as a REEF Field Station, one of the first in British Columbia! I have been able to introduce numerous new divers to the REEF survey project!

What is your favorite fish or marine invertebrate? Why is it your favorite?

I have an affinity for our local PNW Rockfish! Ray Troll’s Rockfish poster adorns my wall as a tribute to my love of rockfish. Discovering something out of the ordinary always gets me excited. In 2008, I spotted a lone Black Rockfish at Whitecliff Park, which is notable because Black Rockfish have just about all been extirpated from Howe Sound. In 2009, also at Whytecliff Park, I confirmed a Blue Rockfish sighting, a species known mostly only from the outer coast. Sharks are my an all time favorite! I had the chance to visit and survey the Socorro Islands with it’s great number of shark species that inhabit the islands. Always awesome to dive with big sharks!

Upcoming Fishinars - Exploring the New Fish ID Book, and more

Topsail Chub is one of the almost 100 species that have been added to the new 4th edition of Reef Fish ID.

We've got lots of exciting, fun, and educational REEF Fishinars in store for you this year - featuring your favorite instructors and special guests alike. Check out the full schedule at www.REEF.org/fishinars. Fishinars coming up include:

  • Digging Deeper in to Caribbean Fish ID - Exploring the 4th Edition of Reef Fish ID - Christy Pattengill-Semmens, June 16th (Part 1) and June 30th (Part 2)
  • Eastside vs Westside: Lookalike Fish from the Pacific and Atlantic Coasts, Andy Lamb and Andy Martinez, June 19th
  • Playing in the Sandbox: Top 12 Sand Dwellers of the Caribbean - Jonathan Lavan, October 7th
  • That Face, That Face, That Wonderful Face! Top 12 Blennies of the Caribbean - Jonathan Lavan, November 4th

REEF Fishinars are a free benefit of REEF membership, and did you know that REEF members can also access and view any of our archived Fishinars from previous years? A great way for new fish surveyors to learn, or for experienced fish surveyors to brush up on their ID skills.

Explore our Fishinar webpage, register for the sessions you like, and we'll see you online!

New Tropical Western Atlantic Survey Paper

Are you an experienced REEF surveyor in the Tropical Western Atlantic (TWA)? If so, you might want to check out our brand new underwater survey paper featuring an extended list of species. The double-sided list fits on the regular yellow slate. The longer list of species means less write-in species and more efficient data entry. When entering your data, just select the longer list in the "Species View" field at the top of the data entry field. You can find the new paper in REEF's online store here - http://www.reef.org/node/433. The store also includes new paper for our Central Indo-Pacific and South Pacific/Fiji regions, along with handy ID guides, and REEF gear!

The Faces of REEF: Doug Biffard

Doug checking out a Red Irish Lord during a survey. Photo by Pete Naylor.
Doug with a little Northern Abalone.
China Rockfish. Photo by Janna Nichols.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Doug Biffard, a REEF member since 2000. An active surveyor who lives in Victoria, British Columbia, Doug has conducted 455 surveys to date and is a member of REEF's Advanced Assessment Team for the Pacific region. Here's what he had to say about REEF:

How did you become involved with REEF?

Back in the 1990s I joined in on Vancouver Aquarium’s annual Lingcod Egg Mass Survey (still an active event). I learned through aquarium connections that REEF and Living Oceans Society were planning training sessions for the recently-developed Pacific Northwest protocol in 1999. I signed up for the Victoria session lead by Susan Francis, one of the first trainers for the Pacific Northwest region.

In your opinion, what is the most important aspect of REEF’s projects and programs?

The really great thing about REEF is the people involved. Dana Haggarty, the young scientist that designed the PNW species list was a real inspiration to me. Janna Nichols, who I met early on as part of the AAT, is the enthusiastic and creative outreach coordinator. And then there are the people who I meet when we travel to the Caribbean on REEF survey trips, like expert surveyor Kenny Tidwell, who has become a good friend with whom I share a passion for fish, nature, and getting outside.

Do you dive close to where you live, and if so, what is the best part about diving there?

Most of my diving is around Victoria BC. We have a huge variety of diving here, from high current sites, walls, reefs, kelp beds, to sand flats. We often encounter seals and sea lions, which can be lots of fun and slightly intimidating.

What is your favorite fish or marine invertebrate? Why?

My favourite fish is the China Rockfish. When I started diving in the 70’s we would often see this fish in the Strait of Georgia, but now they are rarely observed. With increased marine conservation awareness through programs like REEF, I hope to see the China Rockfish return to my old dive sites. One of my favourite invertebrates to find is the Northern Abalone. In contrast, this invertebrate was over-exploited in the 70s and 80s. Harvest for this species was prohibited 20 years ago and now we are starting to see good numbers of juveniles at many dive sites. It is quite a joy to see a little abalone cruising along a reef of pink algae.

What is your most memorable fish find and why?

My most cherished memory of a fish find happened while diving with my wife, Bev (also a REEF surveyor) at a local dive site. Bev spotted what she thought was a common Bay Pipefish, and quickly drew my attention to it. After the dive, Bev asked why I squealed underwater, I explained she had found a fish I have been looking for since I was a young boy -- a very rarely spotted Quillfish!

Come See REEF at a Dive Show

Heading to any dive shows this spring? Check out the list of dive shows that REEF will be attending:

  • Our World Underwater in Chicago, IL, February 26-28
  • Boston Sea Rovers in Boston, MA, March 5-6
  • Beneath the Sea in Secaucus, NJ, April 1-3
  • SCUBA Show in Long Beach, CA, June 4-5

We hope to see you at the shows this year. Make sure to visit the REEF booth to say hello and check the seminar list for REEF presentations!

Fishinars This Summer - Learn About Bermuda Fishes and more

A "redback" wrasse, the unique looking Yellowhead Wrasse found in Bermuda. Learn about this and more in the Fishinar this summer with Ned and Anna DeLoach. Photo by Ned DeLoach.
Learn all about porgy and chub with Carlos and Allison Estape, in their Fishinar. Photo by Paul Humann.

Even though it's summer, we aren't slowing down on our Fishinar series (www.REEF.org/fishinars). We have two great sessions planed, reviewing fishes of the Virgin Islands and Bermuda!

  • Thursday, July 14th - Less Frequently Seen Fish of Virgin Gorda with Janna Nichols
  • Tuesday, August 30th - Fishes of Bermuda with Ned and Anna DeLoach

And later this year, we have even more on the schedule.

  • Thursday, September 8th - Underwater Residents of Barkley Sound, BC with Janna Nichols
  • Thursday, September 15th - Don't Forget the Chubs and Progies! with Carlos and Allison Estape
  • Wednesday, September 21st - Common Fishes of Micronesia with Christy Pattengill-Semmens
  • Tuesday, October 4th - Sea Saba Underwater with Jonathan Lavan
  • Wednesday, November 2nd - Digging Into Data: How to Use REEF's Database
  • Monday, Novemer 14th - Hawaii: Life in the Sand with Christy Pattengill-Semmens

Everyone, including divers, snorkelers, and devout landlubbers, is welcome to join in these free, online webinars. You don't need any special equipment (other than your computer or mobile device) to log on and join in. Be sure to visit www.REEF.org/fishinars to look over the entire 2016 schedule, get more details, and register for your favorite ones. We record all sessions for later viewing, and our archives are available for free viewing for REEF members.

Learn All About Chubs and Porgies During This Month's Fishinar

A Saucereye Porgy, one of the many species that Carlos and Allison will cover at the Fishinar this month! Photo by Paul Humann.

2016 wraps up with one more REEF Fishinar - this time by Carlos and Allison Estapé about those pesky look-alike Caribbean Chubs and Porgies. Join us December 15th at 8pm Eastern time for this live, online session. If you've never been to a REEF Fishinar, we welcome everyone! It's free, of course, and you'll have one hour of fun, camaraderie and learning. And keep an eye out for a brand new schedule of great Fishinars coming to you in 2017. While we have some of them already scheduled, we'll have the complete schedule posted soon!

Register here and be sent automatic reminders: www.REEF.org/fishinars

Putting It To Work: New Publication Uses REEF Data to Evaluate Rockfish Populations in the Puget Sound

Bocaccio, one of the species evaluated in the new paper. Photo by Janna Nichols.

A new paper out earlier this month in the scientific journal, Ecology and Evolution includes REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project data as part of a sophisticated analysis of rockfish populations in the Puget Sound, Washington. The paper was published by Dr. Nick Tolimieri, and his colleagues at National Marine Fisheries Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Estimating a population’s growth rate and year-to-year variance is a key component of population viability analysis (PVA). However, standard PVA methods require time series of counts obtained using consistent survey methods over many years. The authors of this study used REEF data along with two other fisheries datasets to evaluate the long-term trends of rockfish in Puget Sound, Washington State. The time-series analysis was performed with a multivariate autoregressive state-space (MARSS) model. The authors show that using a MARSS modeling approach can provide a rigorous statistical framework for solving some of the challenges associated with using multiple, sometimes inconsistent datasets, and can reduce the proportion of fisheries assessment cases that are assigned a designation of “data deficient.”

The analysis was part of the 5-year review of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) listing of Puget Sound populations of three rockfish species (Bocaccio, Canary Rockfish, and Yelloweye Rockfish). The three sources of data included in the study were: (1) recreational catch data, (2) scuba surveys conducted by REEF surveyors, and (3) a fishery-independent trawl survey. Because there were too few observations of the three species of rockfish in the data sources to analyze these species directly, the MARSS analysis estimated the abundance of all rockfish. Because Bocaccio, Canary, and Yelloweye are deep water species, they are not often seen by REEF surveyors. The other two data sets showed that these rockfishes declined as a proportion of recreational catch between the 1970s and 2010s. The REEF data suggest that other species like Copper and Quillback rockfish have experienced population growth in shallower depths.

To read more about this study and the other scientific papers that have included REEF data, visit www.REEF.org/db/publications.

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