Putting It To Work: New Publication on Role of Mangroves for Fish Populations

Image courtesy Phil1stPix on Flickr.

Mangroves provide important nursery habitat for coral reef fishes, such as grunts, snappers, and others. While this has been shown locally in some studies, a new paper by scientists from NOAA Fisheries and University of Miami RSMAS used REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project data to evaluate mangrove-reef connectivity at the Caribbean regional scale. Their findings, recently published in the scientific journal PLoS ONE, showed that the size of nearby mangrove forests directly influences reef fish densities of at least 6 species.This study is a great example of the power and impact that long-term, wide-spread citizen science programs such as the REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project can have on addressing important ecological and management questions that would otherwise be near impossible to evaluate. Way to go REEF surveyors! Visit www.REEF.org/db/publications to see this and all of the 50+ scientific publications that have included REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project data.

Announcing 2017 REEF Trips Schedule

Join us for our inaugural trip to the Galapagos in 2017.
Also new in 2017 - an Alaska Wilderness Adventure trip.
The underwater world of Dominica awaits. Photo by Ari Perryman.
Learn about the invasive Lionfish in Curacao and The Bahamas.
The schedule includes several liveaboard options, as well as land-based trips.

We are excited to share our 2017 REEF Trips Schedule, with a fantastic lineup of destinations planned. These Field Survey Trips offer a great introduction to fish identification for novice surveyors, and are a fun way for experienced surveyors to build their life list while interacting with fellow marine life enthusiasts. We also offer several Lionfish Research Trips each year. REEF staff, board members, and other REEF experts lead these trips, and each trip features daily educational seminars and a full diving schedule. To find out more or to book your space, contact us at trips@REEF.org or call 305-588-5869. Visit www.REEF.org/trips for full package details. Trips fill up fast so don't delay. And be sure to check out the remaining 2016 trips that still have space, including: Lionfish trips to Honduras and Curacao, Bermuda, Palau & Yap, Barkley Sound BC, Saba, Coronado Island CA, Belize, and Cozumel.

2017 REEF Field Survey Schedule

February 18 - 25 -- Dominica -- Dive Dominica & Castle Comfort Lodge, Led by Lad Akins

April 4 - 14 -- Solomon Islands -- M/V Bilikiki, Led by Christy Pattengill-Semmens

April 22 - 29 -- Turks and Caicos Islands -- Dive Provo and Port of Call Resort, Led by Jonathan Lavan

May 14 - 21 -- Galapagos Islands -- M/V Galapagos Sky Liveaboard, Led by Christy Pattengill-Semmens

June 10 - 16 -- Alaska Wilderness Expedition - Port Fidalgo Inlet, Alaska -- Ravencroft Lodge, Led by Andy Dehart

June 24 - July 1 -- Bahamas -- Lionfish Research Trip Explorer II Liveaboard, Led by Lad Akins and Peter Hughes

June 24 - July 1 -- Roatan -- CoCo View Resort, Led by Janna Nichols and Scott & Patti Chandler

August 19 - 26 -- Curacao -- Lionfish Research and Fish ID Trip Combo GO WEST Diving and Kura Hulanda Lodge, Led by Lad Akins, Peter Hughes, and Ellie Splain

August 19 - 26 -- Sea of Cortez -- Rocio del Mar Liveaboard, Led by Christy and Brice Semmens, SOLD OUT

September 2 - 9 -- Bequia -- Bequia Dive Adventures and Village Apartments, Led by Paul Humann

October 1 - 8 -- Grand Cayman -- Sunset House, Led by Paul Humann

October 14 - 25 -- Indonesia Lembeh Strait -- Eco Divers, Led by Ned and Anna DeLoach, SOLD OUT

October 15 - 19 -- Hornby Island British Columbia -- Hornby Island Diving, Led by Janna Nichols

November 4 - 11 -- Bonaire -- Captain Don's Habitat, Led by Amy Lee and Janna Nichols

December 2 - 9 -- Cozumel -- Chili Charters and Casa Mexicana/Safari Inn, Led by Tracey Griffin

December 3 - 9 -- British Virgin Islands -- Cuan Law Liveaboard, Led by Ellie Splain

Home Grown REEF Clubs! FIN and Pacific Northwest Critter Watchers

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FIN members gathered at Maluaka Beach in July for a Great Annual Fish Count dive.
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FIN members, Liz Foote and Josh Wittmer (who is also a previous REEF Marine Conservation Intern and now works for the Pacific Whale Foundation on Maui), getting ready for a FIN-organized REEF dive at Honolua Bay earlier this month.

We say it often - REEF is what it is because of our fantastic members.  The grassroots nature of the organization is reflected in all aspects of our work, including the amazing volunteers like Audrey Smith who help with daily operating tasks at REEF HQ, the networks of regional REEF partners who enlist new REEF members and provide continuing education and survey opportunities for active surveyors, our members who generously support REEF with financial donations, and of course the thousands of survey volunteers who submit marine life surveys each year. 

As the corps of active and experienced REEF surveyors has grown, we have been fortunate to have some of those members take their support and interest in REEF to the next level by forming local REEF groups.  Two such REEF "clubs" are FIN (the Fish Identification Network)  and the Pacific Northwest Critter Watchers.  FIN is a REEF club based in Maui, and is touted as an opportunity to join friends and fellow fish lovers in exploring the coral reefs of Maui.  The club is for all interested divers and snorklers, and promotes marine conservation and the objectives of REEF.  FIN was founded by Terri and Mike Fausnaugh (Mike is also a member of the REEF Hawaii Advanced Assessment Team (AAT)) and is supported by the cadre of REEFers that REEF partner, Liz Foote of Project S.E.A.-Link, has generated in Hawaii through the years.  There are monthly (sometimes weekly) FIN dives at various beaches on Maui and at every event FIN folks set up a REEF station on the beach with survey materials and identification reference guides in an attempt to lure in new afishianados!  The PNW Critter Watchers encourages all divers in Washington and Oregon to become underwater naturalists.  Through training and quarterly REEF survey dives, Critter Watcher founders and REEF Pacific AAT members, Janna Nichols and Wes Nicholson, aim to put the fun in critter watching and promote REEF surveying in the Pacific Northwest.  Janna also maintains a Critter Watchers website that includes a fish of the month feature, an events listing, unusual sightings reported by fellow Critter Watchers, and congratulations to REEF surveyors who have advanced through the REEF experience level system.

These home-grown REEF clubs are a great way to help spread the fun and enjoyment of REEF surveying to a local dive community.  We are grateful that we have such enthusiastic and supportive volunteers who are willing to help spread the REEF word.  These on-the-ground activities could never be accomplished without your help!

REEF.org Web Tip

Can't remember your REEF number?

Use the lost member number lookup feature on the new Website.

REEF Divers Net Quite a Find

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A derelict gill net found by REEF surveyors in the Puget Sound. The net had ensnared dozens of animals and was damaging habitat. Photo by Pete Naylor.
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A lingcod entangled in the gill net, a result of "ghost fishing". Photo by Pete Naylor.
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The net was draped over rare cloud sponges. Photo by Pete Naylor.

Last Summer during a dive with Pacific Adventure Charters in Hood Canal, Washington, a group of REEF Pacific Advanced Assessment Team (AAT) surveyors came across something unexpected. As part of REEF’s funded project with The Russell Family Foundation, the team’s goal was to look for invasive tunicates and do REEF marine life surveys on several previously unsurveyed sites. While they found the invasive tunicates they were looking for, they also found a derelict fishing net that was damaging fragile habitat and ensnaring marine life.

AAT members, Pete Naylor, Steve Rubin and Janna Nichols found the abandoned gill net on a wall, amid large growths of Cloud Sponge (Aphrocallistes vastus), one of Puget Sound’s rarest and longest lived animals and an invertebrate species monitored in the REEF Pacific Northwest Volunteer Survey Project program. As the name implies, cloud sponges form pale, irregular cloud-shaped colonies, which can be more than ten feet across and seven feet high. These colonies attach to rocky surfaces and provide complex habitat for a variety of marine species. The nearly invisible monofilament derelict gill net was draped over and around the cloud sponge colonies, clearly causing damage. Dungeness crab and other invertebrates lay dead and entangled in the net’s folds.

Concerned by what she saw that day, Janna contacted the Northwest Straits Commission, a regional marine conservation initiative that runs a derelict gear removal program. Given the net’s direct threat to the safety of divers and that it was causing clear harm to marine life and habitat, the Commission made removing the gill net in Dewatto Bay a high priority. After an initial search in the Fall 2007 that failed to locate the net, the net was successfully located with the help of REEF members Keith Clements and Rob Holman. Trained commercial divers removed the net from the fragile cloud sponge reef earlier this month. It was clear during the removal operation that the net had swung in the current and scraped much of the rocky outcrop clean of marine life. But cloud sponge colonies were still present on either side. The initial REEF survey conducted last summer will now serve as a baseline for future monitoring. A REEF team, including Janna, Pete and Steve are planning to revisit the site in May to note any signs of recovery.

Jeff June, the Initiative’s derelict gear program lead commented about the collaborative effort: “This particular net removal effort shows the importance of the REEF divers participation in these types of projects. We would have probably never known there was a gillnet in the vicinity of these amazing sponges had the REEF folks not been monitoring the site.”

Janna made this observation about encountering the net: “From a diver's point of view, it's really shocking to see firsthand just how much marine life a derelict net can snare and kill. We spend hours underwater all around the waters of Washington State, and are specifically attracted to viewing and protecting all the amazing wildlife we can on each dive. Seeing trapped and dead or dying fish and invertebrates is a real shame. Derelict gear not only poses hazards to all the marine life they continue to snare and kill, but to divers as well, because of the entanglement hazards.”

If you are a Pacific Northwest diver, you can report derelict fishing gear in Washington through the WDFW Sighting Form. Other states have similar programs.

REEF News Tidbits for July

  • One female space just opened up on the upcoming Baja Mexico Field Survey aboard the Don Jose Liveaboard. This trip has been sold out for a while and we don't expect the space to last long.  The trip begins and ends in La Paz and runs October 5-12.  Check out the trip flyer to find out more.  Contact Jeanne from Baja Expeditions at 800-843-6967 or travel@bajaex.com.
  • Get your limited edition "It's All About the Fish" t-shirt today.  Available in 4 tropical colors.  Order yours today from the REEF Store.  Also available from the REEF Store is the brand new 2nd Edition of Coastal Fish Identification field guide by Paul Humann.  This book covers species found from California to Alaska and the new edition includes more than 30 new species and over 70 new photographs.  Click here to order your copy.

For The Love of the Sea Benefit - Save The Date

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A pair of courting peppermint basslet. Photo by Ned DeLoach.

Join us on Saturday, February 7, for the second annual For the Love of the Sea Benefit and Auction in Key Largo, Florida, at Amoray Dive Resort. This ocean-themed event will include sunset cocktails, dinner, dancing under the stars to a steel drum band, an auction and presentations by REEF founders and famed underwater photographers, Paul Humann and Ned DeLoach. The evening festivities aim to raise awareness about REEF, our amazing volunteers and the critical marine conservation work that our programs support. A silent and live auction will offer prizes from local businesses and exotic dive travel. Tickets are $85 each. There is a limited number of tickets for purchase this year so don't delay. Click here to purchase tickets online. To buy tickets over the phone, as well as to find out about becoming an event sponsor or to donate an item to the auction, contact Janet Bartnicki at 305-852-0030 or fortheloveofthesea@reef.org. We hope to see you there!

Students Learn About Science From REEF Programs

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Students from the U-32 High School spend a week in Bermuda conducting REEF surveys.
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A U-32 student conducting a REEF survey in Bermuda.
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Clark Magnet High School students conferring about fish sightings in the Channel Islands.
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A map of kelp bass density around Anacapa Island, generated by Clark Magnet High School using REEF data.

The Volunteer Survey Project is at the center of REEF's citizen science programs. It provides thousands of divers and snorkelers the opportunity to contribute information on the status and biodiversity of ocean populations. The Survey Project also serves as a training opportunity in many formal and informal education programs. In this issue of REEF-in-Brief, we feature high school students on both sides of the US who are learning first hand how to conduct fish surveys and analyze their results.

The U-32 High School in Montpelier, Vermont, offers a Marine and Fresh Water Biology Class to Seniors each year. Their instructor, Brian Slopey, is also a REEF surveyor. The course focuses on the comparison between rivers, lakes and the ocean. Students examine the living components of these ecosystems as well as the influence of physical and chemical conditions. The students conduct extensive marine research during a trip to the Bermuda Institute of Oceanic Sciences, including conducting snorkel REEF fish surveys. During each field project, approximately 100 surveys are conducted. In preparation for the trip, students use the Reef Fish Identification Beginning ID Course DVD to learn groups of fish. They then generate Geographic Summary reports for Bermuda from the REEF database and use the Fish ID Interactive DVD software to more closely research species of fish they will likely observe. Once in Bermuda, the students keep an extensive journal that includes fish and invertebrate behavior observations, plankton tow observations, lecture notes and notes on readings.

On the other side of the country, in La Crescenta, California, students at Clark Magnet High School, have been working to collect and analyze marine life survey data from the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (CINMS). With this project, which is currently funded by a Toyota Tapestry Grant, students use geographic information science (GIS) to document effects of marine protected areas on species abundance. Using species lists from the REEF database, students create field reference notebooks on the fish, invertebrates and algal species inhabiting the CINMS. In preparation for field surveys, students practice with the REEF online fish identification quiz. The students then work with dive teams from NOAA, Ventura County Sheriff’s divers and Sport Chalet to conduct REEF surveys for the class and to document the study areas and project procedures with underwater photography. Following the field work, students analyze the data and display the results of their projects as maps and graphs in scientifically formatted poster presentations. Each student poster incorporated an extended abstract that the students submit for publication in The New Journal of Student Research Abstracts.

Are you using REEF programs in a formal or informal education program? Email us at data@reef.org and let us know about it!

Trips For Your Lifelist

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The strange-looking shortnose batfish is one of the critters you might find in Dominica. Photo by Ned DeLoach.
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Topside discoveries like this flamingo colony in Bonaire (and amazing waterfalls in Dominica) can be found on both these trips. Photo by Kai Kane.

Want to add a few new species to your life list? Look no further than Dominica and Bonaire. These islands both offer some unique treasures and are sure to please every level of diver as well as beauty above water for your non-diving companions. REEF is leading Field Surveys to both of these beautiful islands this year, and we invite you to join us! The Dominica field survey trip is April 17 - 24, and Bonaire takes place September 25 – October 2.

The natural beauty of Dominica includes some of the most enchanting topography both above and below the waterline, with several waterfalls and hiking trails to be explored on one of the least developed islands in the Caribbean. The diving is also spectacular, and on our last trip here seven years ago flying gurnards, short-nose batfish, fringed filefish, blackfin snapper, harlequin pipefish and reef scorpionfish were all documented by our keen-eyed surveyors. REEF Board member Heather George is leading the trip this year, and she will help you look for these species and many more.

Few dive sites in the world can provide 100 fish species on a single dive - Bonaire is one of these special places. During our survey week here, you are likely to add at least 5 or more new species to your life list, no matter what your current REEF level. Trip Leader, Jessie Armacost, lived in Bonaire and taught Fish ID there for 7 years. She will help you find clingfish, pikeblennies, maculated flounders, medusa blennies, semi-scaled gobies and many other fish that are rarely found elsewhere. During group sessions you will learn where to look for viper morays, ringed blennies as well as popular fish like spotted drums and seahorses. The diving is easy with great accessible shore dives as well as easy close-by boat dives, and the trip will be particularly exciting this year during the annual coral spawn, when the reef is charged with sexual energy day and night.

Join us on one of these exciting weeks full of fish ID, friendship, new discoveries and great memories! Our full field survey schedule, trip details, and sign up information can be found here.

GAFC in the Northeast - One of the Biggest!

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One hundred and fourteen divers participated in the one-day GAFC NE event.

For the ninth year in a row, New England's SCUBA-diving community hosted the largest single-day Great Annual Fish Count (GAFC) event. On July 24, 2010, a stunning 104 divers conducted 114 fish surveys at 13 locations around Cape Ann and southern Maine. After conducting their surveys, divers gathered at Stage Fort Park in Glouster, MA, for fun, food, and prizes (over $8,000 in prizes were donated for the event). The event was coordinated by active REEF volunteers, Holly Martel Bourbon and Bob Michelson, and was sponsored by the New England Aquarium Dive Club. With support from the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, REEF expanded the Fish Survey Project to the Northeast in 2001 and participation has been slowly growing ever since. We are currently working to increase the frequency that divers conduct surveys, taking it beyond the one-day GAFC event. Regional survey and training materials are currently being revised, and a companion invertebrate monitoring program for the area is also now in development.

Design by Joanne Kidd, development by Ben Weintraub