Putting It To Work: New Publication on Nassau Grouper Populations in the Caribbean

A Nassau Grouper at the spawning aggregation on Little Cayman, which is the focus of research in REEF's Grouper Moon Project. Photo by Christy Pattengill-Semmens.

REEF Grouper Moon scientists co-authored a recent groundbreaking paper in the journal PLoS One that highlights the importance of regional conservation efforts aimed at spawning aggregations in the Caribbean. This study evaluated genetic connectedness between Nassau Grouper populations throughout the Caribbean using DNA markers. The authors obtained genetic tissue samples from 620 Nassau Grouper from 19 sites across 9 countries, including the Cayman Islands. They found evidence for strong genetic differentiation among Nassau Grouper subpopulations throughout the Caribbean. These results suggest that, despite a lack of physical barriers, Nassau Grouper form multiple distinct sub-populations in the Caribbean Sea. Oceanography (regional currents, eddies) likely plays an important role in retaining larvae close to spawning sites at both local and regional spatial scales. These findings highlight the importance of conservation initiatives such at REEF's Grouper Moon program in the Cayman Islands. A PDF of the paper is available online here. You can see a complete list of all scientific papers that have included data from REEF programs at www.REEF.org/db/publications.

The full citation of the paper is: Jackson AM, Semmens BX, Sadovy de Mitcheson Y, Nemeth RS, Heppell SA, et al. (2014) Population Structure and Phylogeography in Nassau Grouper (Epinephelus striatus), a Mass-Aggregating Marine Fish. PLoS ONE 9(5): e97508. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0097508

New Tropical Western Atlantic Survey Paper

Are you an experienced REEF surveyor in the Tropical Western Atlantic (TWA)? If so, you might want to check out our brand new underwater survey paper featuring an extended list of species. The double-sided list fits on the regular yellow slate. The longer list of species means less write-in species and more efficient data entry. When entering your data, just select the longer list in the "Species View" field at the top of the data entry field. You can find the new paper in REEF's online store here - http://www.reef.org/node/433. The store also includes new paper for our Central Indo-Pacific and South Pacific/Fiji regions, along with handy ID guides, and REEF gear!

The Faces of REEF: Doug Biffard

Doug checking out a Red Irish Lord during a survey. Photo by Pete Naylor.
Doug with a little Northern Abalone.
China Rockfish. Photo by Janna Nichols.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Doug Biffard, a REEF member since 2000. An active surveyor who lives in Victoria, British Columbia, Doug has conducted 455 surveys to date and is a member of REEF's Advanced Assessment Team for the Pacific region. Here's what he had to say about REEF:

How did you become involved with REEF?

Back in the 1990s I joined in on Vancouver Aquarium’s annual Lingcod Egg Mass Survey (still an active event). I learned through aquarium connections that REEF and Living Oceans Society were planning training sessions for the recently-developed Pacific Northwest protocol in 1999. I signed up for the Victoria session lead by Susan Francis, one of the first trainers for the Pacific Northwest region.

In your opinion, what is the most important aspect of REEF’s projects and programs?

The really great thing about REEF is the people involved. Dana Haggarty, the young scientist that designed the PNW species list was a real inspiration to me. Janna Nichols, who I met early on as part of the AAT, is the enthusiastic and creative outreach coordinator. And then there are the people who I meet when we travel to the Caribbean on REEF survey trips, like expert surveyor Kenny Tidwell, who has become a good friend with whom I share a passion for fish, nature, and getting outside.

Do you dive close to where you live, and if so, what is the best part about diving there?

Most of my diving is around Victoria BC. We have a huge variety of diving here, from high current sites, walls, reefs, kelp beds, to sand flats. We often encounter seals and sea lions, which can be lots of fun and slightly intimidating.

What is your favorite fish or marine invertebrate? Why?

My favourite fish is the China Rockfish. When I started diving in the 70’s we would often see this fish in the Strait of Georgia, but now they are rarely observed. With increased marine conservation awareness through programs like REEF, I hope to see the China Rockfish return to my old dive sites. One of my favourite invertebrates to find is the Northern Abalone. In contrast, this invertebrate was over-exploited in the 70s and 80s. Harvest for this species was prohibited 20 years ago and now we are starting to see good numbers of juveniles at many dive sites. It is quite a joy to see a little abalone cruising along a reef of pink algae.

What is your most memorable fish find and why?

My most cherished memory of a fish find happened while diving with my wife, Bev (also a REEF surveyor) at a local dive site. Bev spotted what she thought was a common Bay Pipefish, and quickly drew my attention to it. After the dive, Bev asked why I squealed underwater, I explained she had found a fish I have been looking for since I was a young boy -- a very rarely spotted Quillfish!

Come See REEF at a Dive Show

Heading to any dive shows this spring? Check out the list of dive shows that REEF will be attending:

  • Our World Underwater in Chicago, IL, February 26-28
  • Boston Sea Rovers in Boston, MA, March 5-6
  • Beneath the Sea in Secaucus, NJ, April 1-3
  • SCUBA Show in Long Beach, CA, June 4-5

We hope to see you at the shows this year. Make sure to visit the REEF booth to say hello and check the seminar list for REEF presentations!

Fishinars This Summer - Learn About Bermuda Fishes and more

A "redback" wrasse, the unique looking Yellowhead Wrasse found in Bermuda. Learn about this and more in the Fishinar this summer with Ned and Anna DeLoach. Photo by Ned DeLoach.
Learn all about porgy and chub with Carlos and Allison Estape, in their Fishinar. Photo by Paul Humann.

Even though it's summer, we aren't slowing down on our Fishinar series (www.REEF.org/fishinars). We have two great sessions planed, reviewing fishes of the Virgin Islands and Bermuda!

  • Thursday, July 14th - Less Frequently Seen Fish of Virgin Gorda with Janna Nichols
  • Tuesday, August 30th - Fishes of Bermuda with Ned and Anna DeLoach

And later this year, we have even more on the schedule.

  • Thursday, September 8th - Underwater Residents of Barkley Sound, BC with Janna Nichols
  • Thursday, September 15th - Don't Forget the Chubs and Progies! with Carlos and Allison Estape
  • Wednesday, September 21st - Common Fishes of Micronesia with Christy Pattengill-Semmens
  • Tuesday, October 4th - Sea Saba Underwater with Jonathan Lavan
  • Wednesday, November 2nd - Digging Into Data: How to Use REEF's Database
  • Monday, Novemer 14th - Hawaii: Life in the Sand with Christy Pattengill-Semmens

Everyone, including divers, snorkelers, and devout landlubbers, is welcome to join in these free, online webinars. You don't need any special equipment (other than your computer or mobile device) to log on and join in. Be sure to visit www.REEF.org/fishinars to look over the entire 2016 schedule, get more details, and register for your favorite ones. We record all sessions for later viewing, and our archives are available for free viewing for REEF members.

Learn All About Chubs and Porgies During This Month's Fishinar

A Saucereye Porgy, one of the many species that Carlos and Allison will cover at the Fishinar this month! Photo by Paul Humann.

2016 wraps up with one more REEF Fishinar - this time by Carlos and Allison Estapé about those pesky look-alike Caribbean Chubs and Porgies. Join us December 15th at 8pm Eastern time for this live, online session. If you've never been to a REEF Fishinar, we welcome everyone! It's free, of course, and you'll have one hour of fun, camaraderie and learning. And keep an eye out for a brand new schedule of great Fishinars coming to you in 2017. While we have some of them already scheduled, we'll have the complete schedule posted soon!

Register here and be sent automatic reminders: www.REEF.org/fishinars

Putting It To Work: New Publication Uses REEF Data to Evaluate Rockfish Populations in the Puget Sound

Bocaccio, one of the species evaluated in the new paper. Photo by Janna Nichols.

A new paper out earlier this month in the scientific journal, Ecology and Evolution includes REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project data as part of a sophisticated analysis of rockfish populations in the Puget Sound, Washington. The paper was published by Dr. Nick Tolimieri, and his colleagues at National Marine Fisheries Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Estimating a population’s growth rate and year-to-year variance is a key component of population viability analysis (PVA). However, standard PVA methods require time series of counts obtained using consistent survey methods over many years. The authors of this study used REEF data along with two other fisheries datasets to evaluate the long-term trends of rockfish in Puget Sound, Washington State. The time-series analysis was performed with a multivariate autoregressive state-space (MARSS) model. The authors show that using a MARSS modeling approach can provide a rigorous statistical framework for solving some of the challenges associated with using multiple, sometimes inconsistent datasets, and can reduce the proportion of fisheries assessment cases that are assigned a designation of “data deficient.”

The analysis was part of the 5-year review of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) listing of Puget Sound populations of three rockfish species (Bocaccio, Canary Rockfish, and Yelloweye Rockfish). The three sources of data included in the study were: (1) recreational catch data, (2) scuba surveys conducted by REEF surveyors, and (3) a fishery-independent trawl survey. Because there were too few observations of the three species of rockfish in the data sources to analyze these species directly, the MARSS analysis estimated the abundance of all rockfish. Because Bocaccio, Canary, and Yelloweye are deep water species, they are not often seen by REEF surveyors. The other two data sets showed that these rockfishes declined as a proportion of recreational catch between the 1970s and 2010s. The REEF data suggest that other species like Copper and Quillback rockfish have experienced population growth in shallower depths.

To read more about this study and the other scientific papers that have included REEF data, visit www.REEF.org/db/publications.

REEF is Hiring: Store and Facilities Manager

REEF is looking for a good addition to the staff team based at the REEF Campus in Key Largo, FL. We are seeking to hire a full time Store and Facilities Manager to support the operations on the REEF Campus. The REEF Campus serves as an educational center for visitors and groups, with its newly opened Interpretive Center. It is also the Headquarters for supporting our membership of over 65,000 engaging in REEF’s international programs. REEF maintains a physical and online store of field supplies, reference ID books, REEF gear, and novelty items. The Store and Facilities Manager works closely with all REEF team members. They are responsible for the operation of the physical and online REEF Store, general facilities management, and supporting day-to-day accounting. For more information about the position and how to apply visit www.REEF.org/job/storemanager

Ocean Reef Community Foundation Grant Awarded to REEF

Thanks to the Ocean Reef Community Foundation’s grant funding opportunities, REEF is partnering with the Florida Keys Children’s Shelter to provide its resident children and clients with summer programs that include outdoor and water-based field trips and ocean learning. The unique habitats, plants, and animals of the Florida Keys offer a one of a kind childhood experience to those with the resources to venture outside. Educational opportunities like snorkeling, kayaking, or fishing can build a lifelong interest in and ownership of Florida's marine resources, which are economically and ecologically important. REEF is excited to provide these educational field programs to children who otherwise may not have the opportunity.

Participants for this program include clients physically living at the Shelter’s Tavernier residential facility and local children being served by the organization's community-based counselors. Programs and activities are designed to encourage positive self-esteem, self-reliance, problem solving, and positive social behaviors. For some of these children, Nature Days may be a life-changing experience inspiring career aspirations. 

Thank you, Ocean Reef Community Foundation for sponsoring this focused learning program to support REEF and the Florida Keys Children’s Shelter!

St. Vincent Field Survey Breaks One-Week Species Record!

REEF_St-Vincent-group_l.jpg
The REEF St. Vincent Field Survey Team

To those who are in the know, St Vincent is considered the critter capital of the Caribbean. To those who watch fish, it is known that the rare is commonplace and that the fishwatching is unlike any other location in the Caribbean. REEF’s data from the June Field Survey supports those claims. With a team of 13 divers, the REEF group recorded an astounding 243 species, more than 65 of which were unlisted “write-ins” on the survey forms.

Diving with Bills Tewes at Dive St Vincent, long time REEF supporter and widely regarded “Caribbean Character”, the team split up on two boats and survey sites around the southwest end of the island. Long-time REEF expert Franklin Neal provided an extra special view from above and into shallow water as he snorkeled, while other team members spent hours on each dive exploring varied habitats and depths.

Special finds during the week would take an entire newsletter to list, but there were a few fish that stood out including the still undescribed Bluebar Jawfish on most sites, five frog fish on one dive, multiple black brotula, various pipefish commonly sighted and the largest spotfin gobies (10 inches?!) we’ve ever seen. The fish of the week may well have been the Golden Hamlet that Bill pointed out as his favorite fish and the species that adorns the cover of Reef Fish Identification.

The diving was bottom time unlimited and many dives exceeded two hours finishing in shallow water. Habitats were varied and visibility ranged from good to excellent on all of our dives. REEF is already planning our next Field Survey to dive St Vincent in August of 2008. The project will be led by Paul Humann and will be a must for any serious fishwatcher. For more details, contact Joe@reef.org

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