Reports From the Field - 2009 Bermuda Field Survey

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Thirteen lucky REEF members joined Anna and Ned Deloach, Judie Clee, and Chris Flook for a Field Survey to remember in Bermuda.
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The beautiful Puddingwife, one of the largest wrasse species in the western Atlantic. Photo by Ned DeLoach.
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Yellowhead Wrasse in Bermuda show unique coloration patterns. Photo by Ned DeLoach.
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A teeny tiny, baby Bermuda Chub found under floating Sargassum. Photo by Ned DeLoach.

Over eight years ago, REEF expanded its flagship Fish Survey Project into Bermuda. Since then, local surveyors have contributed over 2500 surveys to the sighting database! In October, thirteen volunteers joined local REEF hosts Judie Clee and Chris Flook for a delightfully full schedule. After two extended survey dives each day, we were treated to a night snorkel and picnic to watch glowworms, a slideshow and dinner at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, a private, guided tour of the nature preserve on Nonsuch Island, and a reception and presentations by the scientists from BREAM (Bermuda Reef Ecosystem Assessment and Mapping Programme). The week was topped off with a grand finale dinner and behind the scenes tour of the Bermuda Aquarium and Zoological Park.

One of the best things about fishwatching is seeing something new. Many areas have endemic fish and experienced fishwatchers know that fish coloration and behaviors can vary a lot from region to region. We arrived prepared to add Bermuda Bream, Bermuda Halfbeaks and Gwelly jacks to our lifelists but found ourselves equally thrilled to see the Bermuda version of the Yellowhead wrasse, called the Redback (for its distinctive red coloration) and the brilliant jewel colors of their Puddingwives. Between dives, Chris Flook, from the Bermuda Aquarium, filled buckets with rafts of Sargassum seaweed and pointed out juvenile chubs, crabs, shrimps, pipefish and frogfish. Judie’s expert eye helped us sort out the damselfish puzzle. We dived several times in an area where the Emerald Parrotfish was once quite common but has not been seen for many years. Our possible sightings have generated some excitement and Judie and Chris are investigating further. Our total species count for the week was 115 and included a rare sighting of a Conchfish.

Thanks go out to Triangle Diving for the welcome BBQ (and Lionfish hors d’oeuvres) and their excellent diving services. And very special thanks to the Bermuda Zoological Society for funding REEF in Bermuda and for underwriting many of our special activities of the week. We’ll be back – and promise that it won’t take eight years!

As this report reminds us -- REEF trips are more than just your average dive vacation. Be sure to check out the REEF trip 2010 schedule, which can be found online at www.REEF.org/fieldsurveys/schedule. We encourage you to join us on our adventures in 2010 and Take a Trip the Counts!

REEF Volunteers Conduct Annual Expedition to Monterey Bay

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The REEF team aboard the Monterey Express.
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Long-time Pacific REEF surveyor and AAT member, John Wolfe, reviews sightings with Keith Rootsaert.
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Stunning underwater habitat at the outer pinnacles near Carmel Bay in the MBNMS. The bottom is covered with invertebrates, like the colorful Purple Hydrocoral. Great fish life too, like the gopher rockfish resting on the rock. Photo by Chad King/MBNMS.

Members of REEF's Pacific Advanced Assessment Team (AAT) and other active surveyors gathered in central California earlier this month to survey fish and invertebrate life in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS). Twenty-two divers conducted over 140 REEF surveys at twelve sites during the week-long project. This was the 8th year that the coordinated expedition has been conducted, and the data collected serve as a valuable time-series of information on the status and trends of populations within the Sanctuary. The team was led by REEF Director of Science, Dr. Christy Pattengill-Semmens. Dr. Steve Lonhart, a lead scientist from the MBNMS, and Chad King from the MBNMS, also joined the group for the week to provide valuable local expertise.

In addition to this annual monitoring project, volunteers conduct REEF surveys year-round during their regular diving activities in the area. REEF surveys have been conducted in the Sanctuary since 1997, and to date, over 2,600 surveys have been submitted from the MBNMS in to the REEF database. Click here to see a current summary of REEF data from the MBNMS. The Sanctuary is home to many colorful fish and invertebrates and is a popular spot for sport diving. REEF data collected in the MBNMS are currently being analyzed to document changes in key rocky reef fish species. Projects like the annual MBNMS monitoring are a great way for active REEF volunteers to apply their skills and expertise. These projects are also just one more reason for REEF surveyors to improve their identification skills and increase their survey experience level.

A big thank you to the participating AAT members and other REEF volunteers, and to Dr. Steve Lonhart and Chad King for their participation and logistical support. We also greatly appreciate George Peterson and Justin Kantor from the Monterey Bay Aquarium for hosting our first evening seminar. Field support was provided by the Monterey Express; thanks to owner Tim Doreck and to Captain Phil Sammet for serving at the helm of our adventures. This project would not be possible without the financial support of an anonymous foundation.

Outstanding in their Field: Featured REEF Field Station, Marker Buoy Dive Club

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REEF is proud to partner with over 130 dive shops, dive clubs, individuals, and other organizations as REEF Field Stations.

This month we feature Marker Buoy Dive Club in Washington, which has been a Field Station for about a year. The Marker Buoy Dive Club was founded in 1961 and some of its club members have been diving in Puget Sound since the 1960s and 1970s, so they are very aware of long-term changes in some local fish populations. The Marker Buoy Dive Club currently has about 145 members. They have a dedicated group of members who encourage club participation in the REEF program and in other local activities that raise public awareness of the marine life in Puget Sound. The club is very fortunate to have an active REEF Level 5 surveyor (Rhoda Green) who is willing to teach REEF Introduction to Fish and Invertebrate Identification classes.

In addition to offering ID classes, the club hosts survey dives on a regular basis (sometimes as often as once/week) and encourage club members to report their sightings from their own dives. They have added a REEF News section to our monthly newsletter and are featuring a “Critter of the Month” from the PNW Critter Watchers archive. The club will be recognizing the volunteer efforts of members who have been most active in the REEF program and all club members who turn in at least 10 surveys this year will be entered in a drawing for some fun prizes. Some future plans include encouraging members to become advanced level REEF surveyors and to broaden the range of ID classes including Hawaiian fish identification class for club members who are planning to go on a dive trip to Maui. Club members recently remarked "REEF wouldn’t be the program that it is without the efforts and dedication of our regional Outreach Coordinator, Janna Nichols, and all of the people who volunteer their time to teach the classes, host survey dives, log their surveys and report their sightings – keep up the good work!"

Thanks Marker Buoy Dive Club – you’re a shining beacon to us all!

Putting It to Work: Who’s Using REEF Data, May 2011

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Every month, scientists, government agencies, and other groups request raw data from REEF’s Fish Survey Project database. Here is a sampling of who has asked for REEF data recently and what they are using it for:

-Researchers used data on yelloweye rockfish frequency of occurrence in the San Juan Islands in Washington to evaluate population status for the San Juan County Community Development and Planning Department.

- The Tunicate Response Action Committee (TRAC) in Washington State evaluated data on three invasive tunicates that are included REEF's Pacific Northwest program.

- A scientist from Florida Fish and Wildlife requested data on yellowtail snapper populations in the Southeastern US to conduct analyses for a stock assessment.

Don't Forget to Book Your REEF Trip Now!

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Now is the time to book your 2012 REEF Field Survey trip. We have an exciting lineup planned. Trips are starting to fill up (some are already sold out), so don't delay. Get in touch with our travel experts at Caradonna to find out more and to book your space - 1-877-295-7333 (REEF), or via e-mail REEF@caradonna.com. Destinations include the Sea of Cortez/Baja Mexico, Dominica, Bermuda, the BVI, Nevis, Hornby Island, and many more. The full schedule and more information can be found online at http://www.REEF.org/trips.

Outstanding in their Field: Featured REEF Field Station, Dive Club of Silicon Valley

REEF is proud to partner with over 130 dive shops, dive clubs, individuals, and other organizations as REEF Field Stations. This month we feature the Dive Club of Silicon Valley. The dive club started organizing Great Annual Fish Count Events (GAFC) over 10 years ago. Club member and leader of their REEF programs, Kari Larson, says "The club has always been interested in ways to help the environment and help divers understand their role as underwater ambassadors. As a club we promote fun and safe diving. The GAFC was a perfect fit." After learning about the GAFC, she and fellow club member and husband, Mike Davis, thought it was "a good fit for the club and sounded fun. It gave us a chance to contribute to ocean conservation." Ten years later, they are still at it. The club has scheduled 3 upcoming ID classes and a survey dive at Lover Point Park in Pacific Grove, CA (details below). Kari and Mike feel that as a grass roots effort, REEF helps promote involvement at even a beginner diver level and that is important. Kari also noted that, "The access to the database is important, it allows our divers to see how their efforts make a difference. The online resources help members not only in our home area but as they travel to different locations they can identify the fish there also". Club members have started participating in REEF's online Fishinars and the club offers Level 2 & 3 REEF experience testing.

Dive Club of Silicon Valley - 2012 Great Annual Fish Count Events

June 20, 7-9pm Invertebrate - Dr. Steve Lonhart NOAA

June 26, 7-9pm Basic FishID - Mike Davis PADI IDCS Instructor

July 2, 7-9pm Basic FishID - Mike Davis PADI IDCS Instructor

July 7, 8am GAFC and BBQ at Lovers Point Park in Pacific Grove, CA

The Faces of REEF: Member Spotlight, John Wolfe

Male Kelp Greenling. Photo by Janna Nichols.
John with dive buddies, Dan Grolemund, Kate Chaitin, Deenie Clinton.
John is not only an ID nerd underwater, he enjoys birdwatching too.
John recently submitted a paper for publication that analyzes REEF data from Monterey Peninsula. John evaluated trends in species such as this Young-of-the-Year Canary Rockfish.
One of John's favorite finds, a Masked Prickleback. Photo by John Wolfe.
Rookie Revenge! An Acapulco Damselfish (correctly ID'ed). Photo by John Wolfe.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 43,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight John Wolfe. John joined REEF in 1998 and has conducted 530 surveys. John is a member of the REEF Advanced Assessment Team in both the Pacific Coast and Hawaii. In addition to his active survying, he has delved into teaching about REEF and ID and has mentored several surveyors to become experts. He has also taken a keen interest in getting REEF data used by the scientific and management communities, serving on Marine Life Protection Act committees and has written several papers using REEF data. Here's what John had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF or become a REEF member?

I took my first REEF fish ID class in 1997. It was a Great American Fish Count kick-off event organized by Karen Grimmer of NOAA and taught by Dan Gotshall (author of Pacific Coast Inshore Fishes). My friend Rachid Feretti was the area’s most enthusiastic REEF surveyor at that time. Quite the raconteur, Rachid would pigeonhole anyone (including curious tourists) to describe the REEF diver survey program. In the late 1990’s I only did a handful of surveys every year, thinking of them as special dives with special equipment; I was also a volunteer diver for the sheriff’s department, diving black water and not getting to the ocean as much. In the new millennium I realized that it was more fun to conduct a REEF survey on EVERY ocean dive I did. That was the big break-through. When I realized I could simply put my slate on a retractable harness and tuck it under my BC belly strap, it became a standard piece of my diver gear, taken on every dive.

If you have been on a REEF Field Survey, where and what was your trip highlight?

Since 2003 I’ve participated in every annual REEF Advanced Assessment Team monitoring project in Monterey, my local dive area. It’s always a fabulous assemblage of skilled cold-water divers and enthusiastic fish nerds, with Captain Phil Sammet entertaining us with salty stories and Christy and Brice Semmens calmly and expertly leading the trips. I’ve been on the Sea of Cortez and Big Island of Hawai’i REEF trips once each, and totally enjoyed both experiences, learning a whole new ecosystem of species.

What is your favorite part about being a REEF member?

REEF totally supports my chosen hobby. My father was a fanatic fly fisherman and my mother is a fanatic bird watcher. It’s only natural that I became a fanatic fish watcher. My REEF experience has also taken me beyond just carrying a slate. Between 2005 and 2007, I served as a diver stakeholder and REEF volunteer representative for the California Central Coast Region Marine Life Protection Act initiative. After three years of intense wrangling between conservation and fishing interests, that effort resulted in a network of Marine Protected Areas along the central coast. In the Monterey Peninsula area we fought so hard that the chairman of the Fish and Game Commission, witnessing the debate, called it the Balkans. Nevertheless, I think the contentiousness of that process led to a resulting network of MPAs that all sides now grudgingly admit is a good compromise.

I have also enjoyed teaching others about REEF and ID. Over the past decade I’ve also given several REEF fish ID classes and presentations about the Marine Life Protection Act Initiative to local divers. I’m always looking for that next special diver who will become an enthusiastic and dedicated REEF surveyor. I have found some special people, like Keith Rootsaert and Alex Matsumoto, who now teach REEF fish ID classes and carry on the tradition.

In your opinion, what is the most important aspect of REEF’s projects and programs?

It’s only now, with fifteen years of data in Monterey, and even more in the western Atlantic, that we’re starting to see the value of the REEF surveys as long term data. REEF scientific advisor, Dr. Brice Semmens, points out that such long-term data are quite rare and precious in ecological research. Furthermore, I think we’ve recently made a big breakthrough on how to statistically analyze the data; it’s a gold mine that we’ve only really started to dig into. I’m really excited about a paper I’m co-authoring with REEF Director of Science, Dr. Christy Pattengill-Semmens, about this topic.

Do you dive close to where you live, and if so, what is the best part about diving there? Where is your favorite place to dive?

The Monterey Peninsula is a special place, with rocky reefs, protected coves, and amazing kelp forests. It’s a two-hour drive from my home in Berkeley, well worth the effort. My favorite dive spots along the Monterey Peninsula include North and South Monastery, now protected in the recently expanded Pt. Lobos marine reserve, as well as Point Lobos State Park itself, the longest running no-take marine reserve in the state. Butterfly House and Point Pinos are wild, spectacular shore dives. I also enjoy the mellower Coral Street and Otter Cove dive sites – and I’ve never had a dull dive at the most heavily dived site of our area, the Breakwater. My favorite local boat dive site is Dali’s Wall outside of Stillwater Cove – it’s always a highlight of our annual Monterey field survey.

What is your favorite fish or marine invertebrate?

Do I have to choose? Kelp Greenling, both male and female, are such handsome fish. Juvenile Canary Rockfish are tiny spectacular gold, black and white jewels. Enormous schools of tubesnout threading and weaving their way through a kelp forest is a spectacular sight!

What is your most memorable fish find and why?

Well, I have a few. I’ve only seen one Rockhead Poacher, years ago – it’s a bizarre tiny fish with a punctured pate (pit in the top of its head) that looks just like the orange cup coral it so successfully hides amidst. It's so bizarre, an exciting find! The second would be finding (and eventually photographing) the Masked Prickleback. It is a handsome fish with a tan back, white belly, and broad dark chocolate brown stripe running the length of the fish from eye to tail. This species was only discovered by science in the mid-1960’s, by a night diver at the Monterey Breakwater. That diver, David Powell, later became the Director of Live Exhibits at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. He recounts his discovery of that species in his book “A Fascination for Fish”. Masked Pricklebacks are shy and nocturnal, relatively uncommon and very difficult to photograph. And finally -- an instance of fish ID rookie vindication! On my first Sea of Cortez REEF field survey, I’d made a couple of embarrassing and very public rookie ID goofs early in the week. So later in the week, after coming up from Swanee Reef and telling Brice I’d seen an Acapulco Damselfish, he was certain I’d seen the much more common Cortez Damselfish … until I showed him the photographic evidence. It was the first (and perhaps the only) Acapulco Damselfish the group saw that week.

Great Annual Fish Count 2013

The 22nd annual Great Annual Fish Count (GAFC) is rapidly approaching! Will you be participating? We encourage local shops, dive clubs, and other groups to organize an activity anytime during the month of July (and often training events in June). You can view events already scheduled, and add your own, by visiting www.fishcount.org.

The concept behind the GAFC is to not only accumulate large numbers of surveys during the month of July, but to introduce divers and snorkelers to Fishwatching and conducting REEF surveys. Interested groups can offer free fish ID classes, organize dive/snorkel days, and turn them into fun gatherings! To find out more, contact us at gafc@reef.org.

The Faces of REEF: Mike Delaney

Mike hitting the books during the 2012 REEF Trip to Hornby Island.
Mike (left) at The Edge Diving, a REEF Field Station.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Mike Delaney, one of REEF's earliest Pacific Northwest volunteers. Mike has been a REEF member since 1999, and has conducted 433 surveys. He is a member of the PAC Advanced Assessment Team, and he has the distinction of conducting the 20,000th REEF survey in the Pacific region back in 2011 (see story). Here's what Mike had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF or become a REEF member? How did you first hear about REEF?

I heard about REEF through the Living Oceans Society’s Living Reef Project. I began my training course with Susan Francis and Dana Haggarty in 1999 and I was part of the LOS’s pilot PNW Invertebrate Survey Project. To improve my identification skills of PNW species, I was mentored by Donna Gibbs and Andy Lamb of the Vancouver Aquarium. In an effort to gain more buddies to survey with, I began organizing Great Annual Fish Counts and teaching the REEF curriculum. Fish watching, conducting surveys, and REEF became a passion.

If you have been on a REEF Field Survey, where and what was your trip highlight?

I had the opportunity to visit one of my favorite dive destinations Hornby Island and take part in the 2012 Field Survey lead by Janna Nichols and hosted by Hornby Island Diving . I have been to Hornby Island numerous times, and it is always a treat because it offers a great variety of marine life. During the trip, the group was able to dive a site that is not visited frequently and was inhabited by large schools of rockfish, lingcod, cabezon and colourful invertebrate life that adorns the sandstone walls. Another great thing about REEF is the ability to learn and survey in other regions, whether it is a REEF trip or not. I have had the opportunity to complete surveys in the TWA and in the TEP!

In your opinion, what is the most important aspect of REEF’s projects and programs?

The concept of scuba divers as citizen scientists is inspiring. As an individual we can contribute to a greater good: the understanding of the ocean and its inhabitants! As ocean explorers we can collect data and know that the information collected is being used to support science initiatives to protect the oceans.

Do you dive close to where you live, and if so, what is the best part about diving there? 

In Vancouver we are fortunate to have numerous local dive sites to visit and most of my surveys are completed in the rich emerald waters of British Columbia. One of my frequented dive sites is Whytecliff Park and I had the unexpected surprise of completing the 20.000th PNW survey at the same site in which I conducted my very first REEF survey! Whytecliff is a great site because you never know what critters you might come across. Whytecliff Park offers wall diving with lots of sponges and a sandy bay with eel grass beds for poking around on your safety stop.

Do you have a favorite local (or not) REEF field station or dive shop?

In 2006 I began working at The Edge Diving Centre, which was quickly registered as a REEF Field Station, one of the first in British Columbia! I have been able to introduce numerous new divers to the REEF survey project!

What is your favorite fish or marine invertebrate? Why is it your favorite?

I have an affinity for our local PNW Rockfish! Ray Troll’s Rockfish poster adorns my wall as a tribute to my love of rockfish. Discovering something out of the ordinary always gets me excited. In 2008, I spotted a lone Black Rockfish at Whitecliff Park, which is notable because Black Rockfish have just about all been extirpated from Howe Sound. In 2009, also at Whytecliff Park, I confirmed a Blue Rockfish sighting, a species known mostly only from the outer coast. Sharks are my an all time favorite! I had the chance to visit and survey the Socorro Islands with it’s great number of shark species that inhabit the islands. Always awesome to dive with big sharks!

Upcoming Fishinars - Exploring the New Fish ID Book, and more

Topsail Chub is one of the almost 100 species that have been added to the new 4th edition of Reef Fish ID.

We've got lots of exciting, fun, and educational REEF Fishinars in store for you this year - featuring your favorite instructors and special guests alike. Check out the full schedule at www.REEF.org/fishinars. Fishinars coming up include:

  • Digging Deeper in to Caribbean Fish ID - Exploring the 4th Edition of Reef Fish ID - Christy Pattengill-Semmens, June 16th (Part 1) and June 30th (Part 2)
  • Eastside vs Westside: Lookalike Fish from the Pacific and Atlantic Coasts, Andy Lamb and Andy Martinez, June 19th
  • Playing in the Sandbox: Top 12 Sand Dwellers of the Caribbean - Jonathan Lavan, October 7th
  • That Face, That Face, That Wonderful Face! Top 12 Blennies of the Caribbean - Jonathan Lavan, November 4th

REEF Fishinars are a free benefit of REEF membership, and did you know that REEF members can also access and view any of our archived Fishinars from previous years? A great way for new fish surveyors to learn, or for experienced fish surveyors to brush up on their ID skills.

Explore our Fishinar webpage, register for the sessions you like, and we'll see you online!

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