New Lionfish Reportings App Just Released

REEF is exctied to announce the launch of our new Lionfish Sightings App – a free app designed specifically to connect divers to remove lionfish from the Tropical Western Atlantic. Report lionfish you have collected or simply report lionfish sightings so other divers know where to look! Follow this link to download the app for iOS or follow this link to download the app for Android. Data on lionfish sightings and removal efforts are kept active on the app for 30 days and then archived for research and management purposes. Special thanks for contributions from Wild About Whales NSW, US Fish and Wildlife Service, REEF staff, interns, volunteers, and Jason Nocks.

Putting it to Work: New Publication on Method to Create Species Maps for Fisheries Management

Gag Grouper, one of the species mapped in the Gruss et al paper. Photo by Carol Cox.

We are excited to share the latest scientific paper to include REEF data, published this month in the journal ICES Journal of Marine Science. In this paper, authors use information on where REEF divers did or did not encounter three species of fisheries importance: red snapper, red grouper, and gag grouper. They then combined these data with 36 other data sets, each sampling different areas of the Gulf of Mexico, and created distribution maps for use in ecosystem models of the Gulf of Mexico. These distribution maps picked up fish hotspots that are not identifiable by any individual data set, highlighting the complementary nature of the REEF data.

The full citation of the paper is: Gruss, A., Thorson, J.T., Babcock, E.A., and Tarnecki, J.H. 2017. Producing distribution maps for informing ecosystem-based fisheries management using a comprehensive survey database and spatio-temporal models. ICES Journal of Marine Science, doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsx120.

Visit www.REEF.org/db/publications for an entire list of publications that include REEF data and programs.

It's Not Too Late to Make a Difference in 2017!

Donors of $250 or more during our winter campaign will receive this signed and numbered photograph of schooling hammerhead sharks taken in the Galapagos. Photo by Paul Humann.

Happy New Year and thank you to all our members who have donated during our winter fundraising campaign! Because of your support, we are able to conserve marine environments worldwide. If you have not yet contributed, we still need your help! We are approaching the last few days to make a tax-deductible donation for 2017. Please take a moment to contribute online at www.REEF.org/donate. You may also mail your donation to REEF at PO Box 370246, Key Largo, FL 33037, or call us at 305-852-0030.

The health of the oceans is more important now than ever, and in the coming year, REEF will continue working to protect biodiversity and ocean life. Individual gifts from members like you make what we do possible, and we are so grateful for your support.

As a special thank you, donors of $250 or more will receive a limited-edition, signed, and numbered print of schooling Scalloped Hammerhead Sharks that I photographed in the Galapagos Islands. Click here to make your year-end gift today.

Thank you for being a part of REEF, and we hope you have a wonderful holiday season.We wish you all the best in the new year!

Lionfish - What We Know and What We're Learning

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Lionfish photo by Tom DeMayo
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Juvenile Lionfish photo by Tom DeMayo

If you’ve read recent REEF releases, you’ve heard the news that Indo-pacific lionfish are now well established along the eastern US coast and throughout the Bahamas. REEF has been and continues to work with researchers to learn as much as we can in order to most effectively address the invasion. Since January of this year, REEF has organized and led 5 week-long projects in the Bahamas to document the extent of the invasion and gather samples and information needed by NOAA and Bahamian researchers.

 
Here is what we’ve found:

  • Lionfish are being found as deep as 350’ and as shallow as 2’.
  • Lionfish have been documented in almost all habitat types including patch reefs, artificial reefs, walls, and even mangroves
  • Lionfish have been captured as small as 25mm and as large as 389mm
  • Most lionfish have been in the 200mm size range
  • Lionfish prey has included fish, shrimp and crabs
  • Lionfish appear to have high site fidelity (they don’t move much)
  • Lionfish appear to be reproducing year-round in Bahamian waters
  • The lionfish invasion appears to have come from a small founding population (not a large release of many fish)
  • Stomach content analysis has documented lionfish predation of cleaner fish
  • Every site visited in the Berries in April contained lionfish – most contained multiple fish

 
Here is what we are working on with NOAA and Bahamian researchers:

  • Continuing documentation of lionfish distribution and impacts on local fish populations
  • Documentation of lionfish at cleaning stations and subsequent predation on cleaning fish
  • Predation by other species on lionfish
  • Genetic relationships of lionfish in one area (NC, northern Bahamas) to those in other areas (S Bahamas) to determine dispersion pathways.
  • Parasitology of lionfish (they appear to have few parasite compared to native fish)
  • Larval occurrence at different locations using larval light traps
  • Juvenile recruitment preference using small shallow water nets and trawls
  • Trap preference of adult lionfish
  • Lionfish recruitment rates to sites denuded of lionfish (i.e., recruitment pressure)
  • Recruitment of lionfish to artificial structures
  • And more!

As part of this effort, REEF has planned more research efforts through the end of 2007. Each project will include participation of scientists, researchers, and/or REEF staff. For a list of upcoming projects visit http://www.reef.org/exotic/lionfish/ or e-mail lad@reef.org

Introduction

Hello and happy October! This edition will be REEF-in-Super-Brief since our biggest announcement - the launch of the new REEF.org website - will direct you to endless updates on REEF programs, new online tools, an improved REEF Store, and a new member-login that will allow you to get the most out of the new site. Visit www.REEF.org now!

If you're still with me, read on to learn about an exciting new artificial reef project REEF will embark on in 2008 with the sinking of the USAFS Vandenberg in Key West, Florida and REEF's participation in important inter-agency collaborative research on Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in California. The third of six monitoring events at Biscayne National Park was recently completed; hats off to REEF staff Joe Cavanaugh and Lad Akins and Advanced Assessment Team (AAT) volunteers who served on this project amid challenging weather and personal circumstances.

Earlier this month, REEF lost a valuable partner and close personal friend. Mike "Smitty" Smith was a boat captain at Quiescence Diving Services in Key Largo, Florida and drove the boat for many local monitoring projects. His positive outlook and team spirit will be missed but we hope to honor his commitment to ocean conservation through REEF's continued work in the Florida Keys community.

"Best fishes" from the REEF family to yours,

 

Leda A. Cunningham, Executive Director

Holiday Open House A Swimming Success

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From left: Evelyn McGlone, Amy Slate and Steve Frink catch up while Lad Akins (rear) explains REEF to new members.

On Friday, November 30, REEF welcomed more than 100 local members and new friends to REEF HQ in Key Largo, Florida for the first annual Holiday Open House. The event was intended to raise awareness about REEF in the community and educate REEF neighbors about critical conservation projects going on in the Florida Keys. The first in a series of signed, limited edition Paul Humann prints was raffled off, authors and photographers Ned and Anna DeLoach signed books and everyone enjoyed celebrating the season with friends and fellow fish watchers.

If you find yourself in the Florida Keys, we hope you will swing by and say hello at 98300 Overseas Highway, Key Largo. Many thanks to the newly formed Key Largo Fun-raisers group for helping with this event: Amy Slate, Evelyn McGlone, Mary Powell, Amy Fowler, and Sharon Hauk.

Introduction

Hello and Happy April!

In this edition of REEF-in-Brief, learn about exciting work happening in the Turks and Caicos islands, new lionfish information and opportunities and the chance to help REEF collect data in the tropical eastern Pacific. REEF members recently helped the Northwest Straits Commission locate and remove a derelict fishing net in Hood Sound, Washington, while staff and volunteers made a splash at a south Florida Earth Day event. Please mark your calendars for the 17th Great Annual Fish Count (GAFC), taking place throughout the month of July. The GAFC is a great opportunity for fish watchers new and old to contribute to the largest marine life data collection event REEF holds all year.

My bittersweet news is that this is my last week at REEF. I will be staying in the marine conservation community here in the Florida Keys and will continue to support the critical work that REEF does. The Board of Trustees has identified a strong candidate for my replacement, details of which you will be provided soon. I sincerely appreciate the support each of you has shown REEF and hope our paths cross in the future. Until then, best wishes and best fishes,

Leda

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REEF Database Reaches New Milestones

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Over 8,500 volunteers have conducted 100,000 REEF surveys in the western Atlantic since 1993. Photo by Ned DeLoach.

Earlier this week, on March 3rd, 2009, the number of REEF surveys conducted by volunteers in the Tropical Western Atlantic (TWA) region (incl. the US East Coast, Caribbean, Bahamas, Gulf of Mexico) topped 100,000! The REEF Volunteer Survey Project database as a whole (including all regions) reached this benchmark in October 2006. The 100k surveys have been conducted by 8,582 volunteers at 6,203 sites in the TWA region. Other remarkable project milestones reached this week -- there are now two TWA surveyors who have conducted over 2,000 surveys each(!), many of our surveyors in the Pacific and Hawaii regions are about to surpass the 500 survey mark, and the number of surveys conducted in the Pacific region will soon exceed 15,000. Visit our Top 10 Stats page to see the most frequently sighted species, the most species-rich locations and our most active surveyors.

REEF's mission, to educate and enlist divers in the conservation of marine habitats, is accomplished primarily through the Volunteer Survey Project. The program allows volunteer SCUBA divers and snorkelers to collect and report information on marine fish populations from throughout the coastal areas of North and Central America, the Caribbean and Hawaii, as well as on selected invertebrate and algae species along the West Coast of the US and Canada. The data are collected using a fun and easy standardized method, and are housed in a publicly-accessible database on REEF's Website. These data are used by a variety of resource agencies and researchers. To find out more about who is using the data, visit the Publications page on the REEF website. The first surveys were conducted in 1993. As of February 2009, 125,717 surveys have been submitted to the REEF Survey Project database. Visit the About REEF page to find out more and to see where our volunteers are conducting surveys.

When Is a Blue Not a Blue

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Once thought to be a single species, Blue Rockfish are now being split into two. Photo by Dan Grolemund.
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This is a "blue-blotched" Blue Rockfish. Photo was taken off Dalli's Wall in Monterey, by Janna Nichols.
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This is a "blue-sided" Blue Rockfish. Photo was taken off Slant Rock in the Olympic Coast NMS, by Janna Nichols.

Just when you thought you had it all figured out, you realize there is more to learn. A few years ago, scientists working on Blue Rockfish genetics discovered that there were actually two species of Blues. After fishermen bagged both types off Eureka, California, and were able to correctly separate them by appearance, Drs. Tom Laidig and Milton Love wondered if they could be correctly identified by divers underwater, and in what range and depth they are found. What a perfect project for our west coast REEF surveyors.

Using photos taken by Pacific NW AAT members (Pete Naylor, Janna Nichols) in both Monterey and the Neah Bay area (on our annual REEF survey projects of these areas), they were able to determine that yes indeed, the two species of Blue Rockfish could be correctly ID’d underwater. Both species are being found along the California, Oregon and Washington coasts by fishermen. REEF surveyor Taylor Frierson has seen both species (in the same school!) while diving near Newport, Oregon. The Oregon Coast Aquarium has both species of Blue Rockfish on display in Halibut Flats – a good way to compare them.

Although the species has yet to be officially described, REEF is asking Pacific surveyors, whenever possible, to start separating the two into what for now will be called, “Blue Blotched” and “Blue Sided”. These new species are listed in the Unlisted Species section on the online data entry form. A general “Blue Rockfish” category will still exist if you’re unsure (the one listed on the Listed Species list). We are also asking surveyors who have photos from previous survey dives, to go through and if they can positively ID the species seen based on the photos, to submit the change to us at data@reef.org. Please include the survey number (if know), date, and location.

To help you ID the two species, here are some tips:

Blue Blotched:

  • Blotchy patterns on side
  • Body shape more symmetrical and rounded
  • Blue Sided:

  • More solid coloration of body
  • Lateral line more prominent
  • Body more elongated, flatter underside
  • Lower jaw juts out more
  •  

    Comparison photos may be seen here.

    Design by Joanne Kidd, development by Ben Weintraub