2013 Summer Lionfish Derby Series Announced

REEF Board Member, Peter Hughes, with a haul of lionfish at a Derby.

We are excited to announce the 2013 Summer Lionfish Derby Series! Five years ago, REEF began hosting lionfish derbies throughout Florida and the Caribbean to address the lionfish invasion. A lionfish derby is a single day team competition to collect as many lionfish as possible. Teams collect lionfish using nets or spears while SCUBA diving or free diving, and prizes are awarded to the teams with the most lionfish, biggest lionfish, and smallest lionfish caught. Not only do these events reduce lionfish populations, but they also increase education and awareness, provide samples for research, train divers in safe removal techniques, and help develop the market for lionfish as a food fish. To register or learn more, please visit www.REEF.org/lionfish/derbies. 2013 Derby dates and locations are: June 22 - Green Turtle Cay Bahamas; July 27 - Fort Lauderdale, FL; August 17 - Palm Beach, FL; September 14 - Key Largo, FL.

Putting It To Work: Who's Using REEF Data, December 2013

REEF Data from Hawaii are being used to evaluate ecosystem services models for coral reefs. Photo by David Andrew.

Every month, scientists, government agencies, and other groups request raw data from REEF’s Fish Survey Project database. Here is a sampling of who has asked for REEF data recently and what they are using it for:

-Fisheries scientist are using data on Hogfish from Florida, Puerto Rico, and the USVI to evaluate population status and help set effective catch limits as part of the US Fisheries Management Council's stock assessment.

- A scientist from RSMAS at the University of Miami is evaluating the status of Caribbean predatory fish species, including Gray Snapper, Barracuda, and Goliath Grouper.

- An environmental researcher at University of Miami is assessing biodiversity indexes as a measure of effectiveness with ongoing septic tank replacement and canal improvement projects in the Florida Keys.

- A PhD student from University of Hawaii is using data from Maui Nui to conduct coral reef ecosystem services models.

- A researcher from University of Victoria is using data from Washington and British Columbia to evaluate community richness values for temperate rocky reefs.

The Faces of REEF: Herb Gruenhagen

REEF volunteer trainer, Herb Gruenhagen. Photo by Karen Morgan.
Herb with a jellyfish. Photo by Charles Tu.
Photo by Marc Pidcoe.
Sarcastic Fringehead. Photo courtesy New World Publications.
One of Herb's monthly ID classes, held at Ocean Enterprises in San Diego.
The rarely seen Specklefin Midshipman, found and photographed by Herb Gruenhagen.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Herb Gruenhagen. Herb has been a REEF member since 2001, and has conducted 208 surveys (all in his home state of California). He is a member of the Pacific Coast Advanced Assessment Team as an Expert Surveyor. Here's what Herb had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF or become a REEF member?

In July 2000, the San Diego Ocean Foundation sunk a Canadian Destroyer as an artificial reef. I was one of several divers who performed both fish and invertebrate surveys, using transects, quadrats, and REEF Roving Surveys. When the San Diego Oceans Foundation decided to become a REEF Field Station, I volunteered to become a volunteer REEF instructor. I have been teaching a REEF class each month in San Diego since that time.

What are some of the highlights of your local diving?

I dive the La Jolla Shores most of the time, and it is always changing. There are the resident species, the transients, and the seasonal ones. The resident species will always be there no matter what. The transients can be the many pelagic species that the currents bring in. For example, a while back, we are seeing several different species of jellyfish and the leopard sharks are returning to the warmer water shallows near the Marine Room. The seasonal species are really the special surprises. During the early spring the nudibranchs come out to start their mating, and in the winter, we have a ‘white’ Christmas with all the Market squid schooling, mating, and laying their white finger-like egg cases. Other special surprises can be molas, baby grey whales, midshipman, mantis shrimp, wolf-fishes, and even Finescale Triggerfishes.

What is the most interesting thing you’ve learned doing a REEF fish survey?

Doing REEF surveys really highlights the many different variations that a given species can take on. Being a REEF surveyor gives you the ability to recognize new species from common species, and all the many variations within the same species. Paying attention to all the details is really important to getting a good ID. I try to get a good image of the fish and ask for help when I’m not sure.

In your opinion, what is the most important aspect of REEF’s projects and programs?

After all the years of teaching the courses, I’m just really glad to see local divers coming to my class to expand their knowledge of the local marine life, whether they do one survey or many surveys. I love watching the learning process and expanding the students minds of the many wonderful forms of marine life we have here to enjoy and need to perserve for future generations.

Do you have a favorite local (or not) REEF field station or dive shop?

The REEF Field station is the San Diego Oceans Foundation, but the facilities that we use is Ocean Enterprises in San Diego. Ocean Enterprises has been very supportive over the years and everyone really appreciates the use of their classrooms, computer and projector and its central location in the city. Thank you Ocean Enterprises for your many years of support.

What is the most fascinating fish encounter you’ve experienced? What is your favorite?

Well, of course photographing species new to science or that is rare or very uncommon is a highlight. I have photographed several fishes and nudibranchs that fall into one of those categories. My most fascinating fish that I have seen is the Specklefin Midshipman, Porichthys myriaste. We see many juvenile Plainfin Midshipman in the winter, but the Specklefin were quite a find! One of my favorite fishes is the Sarcastic Fringehead. They are one of the few fishes that see you as a threat and will interact with divers and their photo gear. They will charge out of their breeding holes (ok, we are talking about a 6” fish) at the camera lens, thinking they are seeing ‘another’ fringehead in the lens. They will bite all your cables and your finger and charge back into their hole. They will also interact with each other and fearlessly defend their breeding holes by opening their mouths at each other beyond the stretching point.

Herb teaches free Southern California Marine Life ID classes the third Wednesday of each month. Join him!

New Tropical Western Atlantic Survey Paper

Are you an experienced REEF surveyor in the Tropical Western Atlantic (TWA)? If so, you might want to check out our brand new underwater survey paper featuring an extended list of species. The double-sided list fits on the regular yellow slate. The longer list of species means less write-in species and more efficient data entry. When entering your data, just select the longer list in the "Species View" field at the top of the data entry field. You can find the new paper in REEF's online store here - http://www.reef.org/node/433. The store also includes new paper for our Central Indo-Pacific and South Pacific/Fiji regions, along with handy ID guides, and REEF gear!

Take a REEF Trip in 2016!

If you haven't checked out the 2016 REEF Trips schedule yet, now's the time. We have an exciting lineup of destinations planned, and we hope you will join us. These trips offer a great introduction to fish identification for novice fishwatchers, and are a fun way for experienced surveyors to build their life-list while interacting with fellow ocean enthusiasts. We are also offering three of the ever-popular Invasive Lionfish Research Studies trips. REEF staff, board members, and other marine life experts lead the trips, and each features daily classroom seminars and a full diving schedule.

To find out more or to book your space, contact us at trips@REEF.org or call 305-588-5869. Visit www.REEF.org/trips to see the complete schedule, package details, trip leader bios, and more. Book early - REEF trips often sell out! Also, keep an eye on the REEF Trips webpage because we will be adding a few more trips to the 2016 schedule (and beyond) in the coming months.

2016 REEF Field Survey Schedule

Feb 6 - 13 -- Dominica Invasive Lionfish Research Study -- Dive Dominica & Castle Comfort Lodge, Led by Lad Akins and Peter Hughes

Feb 20 - 27 -- Barbados -- Dive Barbados Blue & Coconut Court Beach Hotel, Led by Lad Akins

April 9 - 16 -- Philippines Dumaguete -- Atlantis Resort Dumaguete, Led by Dr. Christy Pattengill-Semmens and Dr. Brice Semmens, One male share space left

April 16 - 23 -- Philippines Tubbataha Reef -- Atlantis Azores Liveaboard, Led by Dr. Christy Pattengill-Semmens and Dr. Brice Semmens, Sold Out

May 14 - 21 -- Honduras Bay Islands Invasive Lionfish Research Study -- M/V Caribbean Pearl II, Led by Lad Akins and Peter Hughes

June 18 - 25 -- Florida Keys and Blue Heron Bridge -- Islamorada Dive Center & Postcard Inn, Led by Carlos and Allison Estape

Aug 13 - 20 -- Virgin Gorda -- Dive BVI & Guavaberry Spring Bay, Led by Janna Nichols

Aug 20 - 27 -- Curacao Invasive Lionfish Research Study -- GO WEST Diving & Kura Hulanda Lodge, Led by Lad Akins and Peter Hughes

Oct 1 - 8 -- Bermuda -- Triangle Diving & Grotto Bay, Led by Ned and Anna DeLoach

Oct 9 - 13 -- Barkley Sound, British Columbia -- Rendezvous Dive Adventures, Led by Janna Nichols

Oct 22 - 29 -- Saba Sea & Learn -- Sea Saba & Juliana's Hotel, Led by Paul Humann and Jonathan Lavan

Nov 7 - 10 -- Coronado Islands, MX and San Diego, CA -- Waterhorse Charters, Led by Jonathan Lavan

Dec 3 - 10 -- Belize Turneffe Atoll -- Blackbird Caye Resort, Led by Christy Pattengill-Semmens, Ph.D.

Dec 3 - 10 -- Cozumel -- Chili Charters & Safari Inn or Casa Mexicana, Led by Tracey Griffin

Come See REEF at a Dive Show

Heading to any dive shows this spring? Check out the list of dive shows that REEF will be attending:

  • Our World Underwater in Chicago, IL, February 26-28
  • Boston Sea Rovers in Boston, MA, March 5-6
  • Beneath the Sea in Secaucus, NJ, April 1-3
  • SCUBA Show in Long Beach, CA, June 4-5

We hope to see you at the shows this year. Make sure to visit the REEF booth to say hello and check the seminar list for REEF presentations!

The Faces of REEF: Lad Akins Awarded DEMA's Reaching Out Award

Lad teaching a lionfish handling workshop.

We are excited to announce that Lad Akins, REEF Director of Special Projects, is a 2016 recipient of Diving Equipment & Marketing Association (DEMA)’s Reaching Out Award! First presented in 1989, this award honors leaders in the diving community whose significant contributions to the sport have elevated the industry on all levels. Lad will join distinguished past recipients including Jacques Cousteau, Dr. Sylvia Earle and Dr. Eugenie Clark, as well as REEF Co-Founder Paul Humann, and Board of Trustees Members Peter Hughes and Marty Snyderman.

Lad has worked tirelessly since REEF’s founding in 1990 to educate divers around the world about the marine environment and how to actively engage in conservation efforts through citizen science. Due to Lad’s efforts and dedication over the past 26 years, REEF is one of the largest citizen science organizations in the world with more than 60,000 members and over 200,000 fish surveys submitted to REEF’s online marine sightings database.

Lad spearheaded REEF’s efforts to combat the lionfish invasion over a decade ago. Lad has worked with scientists, government officials, the dive industry and the public to spread awareness and to facilitate the management and effective removal of these prolific invaders. His contributions to this issue have been numerous, widespread, and inventive. He pioneered the concept of lionfish derbies, and has authored or co-authored 30 scientific publications, as well as other publications, including “Invasive Lionfish: A Guide to Control and Management” and “The Lionfish Cookbook: The Caribbean’s New Delicacy”, now in its second edition.

Without Lad, REEF would not be where it is today. We are happy that he is receiving the recognition for his work to conserve our oceans and his impacts on countless divers and citizen scientists.

Congratulations, Lad!

The Faces of REEF: Laurie Fulton

Laurie with one of the dive masters from our Philippines Field Survey in 2016.
Laurie surveying in Tubbataha Reef. Photo by Ron Lucas.
Showing off her 600th dive while on the Fiji Field Survey in 2015.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Laurie Fulton. Laurie lives in Colorado, and has been a REEF member since 2012. She is an Advanced Surveyor (Level 3) in four of REEF's regions. She participated in the REEF Expedition to the Azores last summer as part of REEF's expansion to the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. To date, Laurie has completed 197 surveys. Here’s what Laurie had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF?

My first REEF trip was in 2012 to the Sea of Cortez on the Rocio del Mar. I had done volunteer trips with other non-profit groups, and was looking to combine my love of diving with volunteer work. REEF provides the perfect combination of both passions.

If you have been on a REEF Field Survey, where and what was your trip highlight?

Since 2012 I have been hooked on REEF trips and try to do a few each year. Every trip is filled with remarkable experiences, and I consider every new fish added to my life list as a highlight. That being said, it’s hard to beat the extraordinary experience of having whale sharks swim by in the Philippines!

What is your favorite part about being a REEF member?

I really enjoy expanding my knowledge and appreciation of the undersea world combined with the opportunity to dive with like-minded people and contribute to research data. I compare it to birdwatching. In addition to observing, identifying and counting, we get to add our data to a vast online database that is available to researchers around the world. It is citizen science at its best!

Where is your favorite place to dive?

Living in Colorado I don’t get to do much local diving, so I love having the great variety of REEF trips available to me. One of my favorite destinations has been Fiji for the calm warm waters and huge diversity of fish to count!

What is the most fascinating fish encounter you’ve experienced?

A stand out for me was in Hawaii watching a Peacock Grouper coax a Whitemouth Moray out of its hole for a session of cooperative hunting. The grouper kept rubbing up against the eels head until the moray plunged down into jumbled coral and rocks while 5 groupers raced along above it. Just like using a dog to hunt.

What is your favorite fish or invertebrate?

One of my favorite marine creatures has to be the octopus. I have had many encounters with these intelligent animals over the years and am always thrilled to see them on dives. Just watch Hank on ‘Finding Dory’!

Do you have any surveying, fishwatching, or identification tips for REEF members?

Before each REEF trip I spend time watching the Fishinars for the region. I also take the survey paper and mark the page number from the book for each species next to it. That way I look at each fish and become familiar with the layout of the survey paper.

What is your most memorable fish find and why? What fish do you really want to see underwater?

Last year in the Bahamas I found a Golden Hamlet, which is pictured on the cover of the Humann and DeLoach book. It is my only sighting after years of diving in the Caribbean, so it was very exciting. It was not a REEF trip so no one on the boat quite got it. I would love to swim with a Mola Mola, it’s just such an odd fish.

5th Annual Nearshore Assessment Conducted in the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

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The REEF OCNMS '07 Team: Kirby Johnson, Stan Kurowski, Reg Reisenbichler (l. to r. back row); Phil Green, Rhoda Green, Captain Mike Ferguson, Doug Biffard (l. to r. front row)
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A REEF surveyor returns from a dive to the Porthole Dive Charter's diving vessel Dash on a very calm day diving in the Olympic Coast NMS.

A team of Pacific REEF Advanced Assessment Team (AAT) divers recently conducted a week-long project conducting surveys of fish and invertebrate communities along the rugged outer coast of Washington.  The Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary covers over 3,300 square miles of ocean off Washington State's rugged and rocky Olympic Peninsula coastline.  Sanctuary waters host abundant marine life.  A small but important stretch of coastline along the Strait of Juan de Fuca features some of the best diving in Washington State, but is rarely visited because of the remote location and limited diving facilities. 

The team included 6 REEF AAT members and conducted 5 days of diving with Porthole Charters.  The weather, which is always a wild card out there, fully cooperated and the team was able to visit all of our priority sites within the Sanctuary, most of which have been surveyed annually since 2002.  A total of 72 surveys were conducted.  To find out more about REEF's work in the OCNMS, visit http://www.reef.org/programs/sanctuaries/OCNMS .

Funding and support for this year's project was generously provided by Washington Scuba Alliance (WSA), an anonymous private foundation, the Winter's Summer Inn in Seiku, and the REEF survey participants.  REEF encourages our Washington members to join WSA - it's free.

Five-Year Wellwood Restoration Assessment Completed

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The M/V Wellwood aground on Molasses Reef. Photo courtesy of the FKNMS.
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A REEF diver conducts an RDT survey at the Restoration Site in October 2002, with several restoration modules in view.
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Location map showing areas of fish monitoring effort.
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Transplanted specimens of Sstaghorn coral on one of the restoration modules (colonies were transplanted in 2004, photo taken August 2007). Photo by Ken Nedimyer.
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Wellwood AAT Team, Summer 2007

REEF has just completed our final assessment report for our five-year Wellwood Restoration Site monitoring project. Before I share some results from our study, let me give you a little background information and please visit our website to view our full report http://www.reef.org/programs/monitoring/wellwood. The M/V Wellwood, a 122-meter Cypriot-registered freighter, ran aground on August 4, 1984, on Molasses Reef off Key Largo, Florida, part of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS). The ship impacted the reef’s upper fore reef and subsequently remained aground for 12 days. The grounding destroyed 1,285 square meters of living coral reef and injured 644 square meters of coral reef framework. Prior to the grounding, the area was a transition zone with high relief coral formations. The grounding transformed the area into a flattened, barren pavement covered with coral rubble. 

The study area of this project included a portion of the grounding area that is being restored and two adjacent reference sites. The Restoration site surveyed included restoration modules and contiguous low profile hardbottom areas adjacent to and in between the restoration modules. Nearby high profile reef, ledges, and undamaged/unrestored reef were not included as part of the Restoration Site. A north and south undamaged reef area were both used as two control sites to compare fish sighting data between the Restoration area and the natural (control) reefs.

REEF’s study focused on fish assemblages and not the coral and invertebrate communities. A team of Advanced Assessment Team REEF Experts conducted Roving Diver Technique (RDT) surveys in addition to belt transect surveys on the Wellwood restoration site and two adjacent natural reef sites seven times during Year 1. The team visited the sites once prior to restoration (May 2002) and 13 times after restoration was completed, monthly for the first three months, quarterly for the following year and semi-annually thereafter. An average of 12 surveys of each survey type was conducted during each survey effort. While REEF surveyors used the RDT surveys to collect sighting frequency and abundance data on fishes over all three reef areas, the belt-transect method was used to collect density and biomass data on fish taxa. These two methods used together give us a snapshot of how the restoration site is recovering in terms of fish assemblages as compared to the two non-impacted, adjacent reef areas.

Obviously, the most notable observation a diver makes when diving on the Restoration site is one of just how long it takes coral reefs to recover after devastating ship impacts. The Restoration site shows little resemblance to the surrounding non-impacted reef sites. The areas surrounding the Restoration site are high relief reef areas dominated by reef building corals with some very old colonies of Star coral (Monastrea annularis) and Elkhorn coral (Acropora palmata), old to the tune of thousands, not hundreds of years old. Age is important here since it takes a long time for coral colonies to rebuild structure and relief that attract different fishes over time. The smaller overall fish populations and absence of many species of fish on the damaged site are both conspicuous and the lack of coral structure makes it easy to destinguish the Restoration area from the surrounding reefs even 23 years after the initial ship grounding. However, there are signs that fishes are very slowly recruiting onto the Restoration site.

During the monitoring period (2002 - 2007), a total of 165 species were recorded at the Restoration site, 189 species at the North reference site and 207 species at the South reference site. The Restoration site recovery is clearly aided by the addition of restoration modules (2002), increasing the amount of available habitat suitable for reef fish communities, think vertical habitat here, and recessed areas underneath these modules for fish to shelter. At the Wellwood grounding site, the overall fish diversity as well as density and biomass of most key fish families continue to be less than that of the two nearby, non-impacted reefs that were selected as monitoring reference sites. Parrotfish and surgeonfish appear to be responding the quickest to the restoration efforts, grazing along a recovering hard coral landscape currently dominated by soft corals (Gorgonians). Nearly absent today on the damaged area are sightings of grunts and snappers, both of which are seen in high frequency and abundance on surrounding reef sites with plenty of relief for them to take cover. Residency of fish, movement patterns and habitat usage are all important indicators of reef recovery. So are linking coral, invertebrate, and fish studies to see a more complete picture of how the Restoration site is improving. There are signs outside of the slowly improving trends the data show such as a little Redspotted hawkfish that has taken residence on one of the modules with lots of Ken's Staghorn coral affixed.

Many more studies are necessary to properly evaluate recovery dynamics for reefs and since most reef recoveries worldwide are hampered by other anthropogenic impacts such as overfishing, excessive nutrient loading from human pollutants, and global warming stresses, these case studies are critically important in developing mitigation strategies for damaged reefs. For the full report on our Wellwood findings, please visit our website http://www.reef.org/programs/monitoring/wellwood. REEF would like to thank the many individual REEF members who dived on this project over the past 5 years, as well as Quiesscence Dive Shop in Key Largo for dive support, and Ken Nedimyer for photos and his ongoing coral replenishment work. And finally, our thanks to the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary for contracting REEF for this project. We hope that this work will continue in order to monitor the long term changes in fish assemblages on the Restoration site.

 

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