Upcoming Fishinars - Cleaning Stations with Ned and Anna DeLoach, Sharkinar with Marty Snyderman and Andy Dehart, NE Fishes, and More!

A grouper getting cleaned! Photo by Ned DeLoach.

New Fishinars continue to be added, and upcoming sessions include special sessions all about cleaning stations with Ned and Anna DeLoach, a Sharkinar with Andy Dehart and Marty Snyderman, and Northeast Fishes, plus several new Caribbean fish topics including fish you will see on your safety stop and those you will find in the biodiversity hotspot of Bonaire! Check out the Webinar Training page (www.REEF.org/resources/webinars) for the most up-to-date listing. These popular online training sessions provide fishie fun in the comfort of your own home. Fishinars are free, and open to all REEF members. You need to register for each session you want to attend. No special software is required, just a web browser. Upcoming sessions include:

Cleanliness is Next to Fishiness: All About Cleaning Stations with Ned and Anna DeLoach - May 15

Special Session: Scubaboard's Bonaire's Top 25 with Jonathan Lavan  - May 21

Sharkinar! with Marty Snyderman and Andy Dehart - May 28

Diving the Northeast: Fish You Should Know - June 13

Safety Stop Survey: the Top 12 Caribbean Fish You May See at 15 Feet in 3 Minutes - July 11

Check out the Fishinar page for more details and to register for each session.

Outstanding in their Field: Featured REEF Field Station, Bandito Dive Charters

Bandito Charters dive boat, the Sampan.
Jackie DeHaven, owner of Bandito Charters, showing her REEF pride!
Jackie is a REEF level 5 surveyor. Photo by Dave Hicks.

REEF is proud to partner with over 130 dive shops, dive clubs, individuals, and other organizations as REEF Field Stations.

This month for our Field Station spotlight, we're heading up to the cold waters of Puget Sound - Tacoma, Washington to be exact. Here we'll find Bandito Dive Charters, whose boat, the Sampan, hosts about a 1,000 divers each year on sites in Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands. Bandito Dive Charters, owned by Captains Rick Myers and Jackie DeHaven, is lucky enough to have the critter ID talents of Jackie on board. Jackie is a REEF level 5 Expert surveyor for the Pacific coast region. She first got involved with REEF by taking a fish ID class from REEF Outreach Coordinator, Janna Nichols, over 9 years ago, and has done hundreds of surveys in the area. The dive charter has been a REEF Field Station almost 5 years now.

Jackie says, " Developing our flagship boat, Sampan as a REEF Field Station seemed a perfect fit to offer our customers REEF classes, materials, and the opportunity to talk about the diverse creatures found in our Pacific Northwest waters with a fellow diver (me, level 5 surveyor) who could assist with creature identification. We host several underwater photographers and the REEF field station status allows us to provide support for creature ID when the photographers are asking “What will I see?” at various sites."

Jackie continues, " We provide multiple copies of fish ID books focused on Pacific Northwest fish, invertebrates and nudibranchs. We provide slates, waterproof paper, and guided fish ID dives if requested and arranged in advance. We can teach REEF fish ID classes at our marina facilities prior to scheduled dive trips and/or on the boat en-route to dive sites." Bandito Charters would like to offer more intro-level REEF fish ID classes combined with two boat dives for the initial surveys.

Jackie's favorite fish – only because it's so rare for a diver to see – is the sixgill shark. She has been surveying Puget Sound waters since 2003 and has only seen them once or twice. In fact, in recent years, very few have been spotted at all in south Puget Sound. Jackie says, "Sixgill sharks are such large creatures who can move silently through your field of vision, almost elusive, yet they show such tremendous power, grace, and presence." 

When we asked Jackie what things she liked best about REEF, she enthusiastically replied, "It is so EASY!!!! Submitting data online is quick, the Website is incredibly easy to navigate, and I feel that REEF surveys are offering a valuable tool for assessing the health of our waters and local species."

Welcome to the Golden Hamlet Club - Patricia Richardson

Patricia Richardson of Hawaii recently submitted her 1000th REEF survey! Pat joins 16 other REEF members in the Golden Hamlet Club. Pat has done most of her surveys at one location, Richardson Ocean Park in Hilo, which has given her a very unique perspective on how the populations change throughout the year and over time. When asked about her recent achievement and what she thinks about REEF, Pat had this to say-- "REEF has provided me with a purpose for my retirement years that is filled with constant beauty and new things to see and learn. I am very grateful to REEF for giving a focus to my passion. Imagine doing something so beatiful and satisfying - and getting to call myself a citizen scientist as a big bonus!"

You can read more about Pat in this past Faces of REEF Member Spotlight. Congratulations Pat, and thank you for your dedication to REEF's mission!

The Faces of REEF: Daryl Duda

Daryl underwater. Photo by Steve Simonsen.
A smiling porcupinefish. Photo by Daryl Duda.
Scrawled Cowfish eating a jellyfish. Photo by Daryl Duda.
One fish that can scare a shark - the Goliath Grouper. Photo by Daryl Duda.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Daryl Duda. Daryl has been a REEF member since 2012, and has conducted 43 surveys. He is working his way up the ranks, and is now a Level 3 Surveyor! Here's what Daryl had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF or become a REEF member?

I first learned about REEF during a stay in Key Largo while spending the day with the Coral Restoration Foundation. Later, I met Keri Kenning (past REEF intern and staff) at "Our World Underwater" scuba show in Chicago and she invited me to the little yellow house on my next visit to Key Largo. Its been over 2 years and I've been a member since.

What are some of your favorite moments as a REEF surveyor?

During REEF's 20th anniversary REEF Fest event last summer, I did my first survey dives, and it happened to be with Paul Human, Ned and Anna DeLoach, and Jonathan Lavan. After a morning full of interesting seminars, the afternoon diving with this all-star REEF cast made for an incredibly fun filled day. Since those first surveys, I find it difficult to be underwater and not identify and count fish. I feel like all my previous diving was just being underwater looking around. As the Sherpa said to Sir Edmund Hiliary as they scaled the mountain, "Some come to look, but others come 'To See'". I see things I have never seen before now that I started doing field surveys.

Do you have a favorite REEF Field Station?

There are many terrific dive shops in Key Largo. My favorite is Rainbow Reef Dive Center. They put a guide in the water with every 6 or so divers at no extra charge. This way I can concentrate on my photography and fish identification. Their crew is extremely knowledgeable about underwater life and curious about everything we see. Captain Alecia Adamson (another past REEF intern and staff) has become my fish ID mentor. Whenever I get stumped by a fish, I email her a photo and she helps me out.

Do you have a memorable fish encounter?

Diving on Molasses Reef in Key Largo one day, we swam around a ledge to see a 6 foot reef shark cozy up to a goliath grouper. The grouper let out a loud bellow that frightened the shark away. I never saw such a large fish swim so fast. Also, at Elbow Reef off Key Largo I got some good shots of a scrawled cowfish chomping on a jellyfish. It was the cutest thing to watch.

What is your favorite fish?

My favorite fish is the Porcupinefish. I can usually get reasonably close to get a good photo. They always look like they are smiling at you. I also like Honeycomb Cowfish that can change colors right before your eyes.

Any fishwatching tips to share?

I started of very slowly identifying fish because I didn't know very many. I always carry my camera on a dive and Ned DeLoach suggested using my point and shoot to help with my fish ID. Later back home I can zoom in and do a more accurate ID using my library of reference books. If I can't figure it out, I can email the photo to someone at REEF or post on the ID Forum at REEF.org.

REEF Ocean Explorers Summer Camp

We are very excited to introduce REEF’s Ocean Explorers Camp: a summer day camp designed for the ocean-minded and adventurous! REEF Ocean Explorers Camp immerses campers in an ocean of learning and fun! Based at John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park in Key Largo, Florida, REEF will introduce campers to the underwater world and all the amazing things found beneath the sea. Each camp session includes:

  • Snorkel trips to the first underwater state park in the US
  • Kayak ventures into winding mangrove trails
  • Stand up paddle board excursions over seagrass beds
  • Glass bottom boat rides offering a view from the surface
  • Marine science lessons, experiments, and crafts
  • Opportunity to connect with nature and make new friends

Join REEF’s Ocean Explorers Camp to make a splash this summer. We welcome campers ages 8 – 14. Sibling discount available. A $275 camp tuition includes park entry fees, activity expenses, equipment rentals, and souvenir REEF gear including a T-shirt and water bottle! Camp sessions are offered June 15-19, July 13-17, and August 10-14. For more information please visit www.REEF.org/Explorers/Camp or call (305) 852-0030.

REEF Rash Guards and 2nd Edition of Tropical Pacific Fish Book in Online Store

We just added a few great items to REEF's online store -- new rash guards and the much-anticipated 2nd edition of Tropical Pacific Fish Identification. Now is a perfect time to get a jump on your holiday shopping! The rash guards provide stylish sun protection while showing off your support for REEF. The new book includes information on over 200 new species and features over 2,500 color images of fishes you will see throughout the tropical Pacific regions of Indonesia, Philippines, Fiji, and more. Visit www.REEF.org/store to check out these items and more.

REEF Fest 2016 - Make Your Plans

We hope to see you in Key Largo this Fall for REEF Fest 2016! Mark your calendar -- September 29 – October 2, 2016. Our annual celebration of marine conservation includes diving, educational seminars, and social gatherings! Check out www.REEF.org/REEFFest for more information.

More Fishinars Coming Soon

Flagtail Tilefish, one of the many great fish you can find in the sand in Hawaii. Photo by Barry Fackler.

Don't miss these great Fishinars (www.REEF.org/fishinars) we are offering this fall!

  • Tuesday, October 4th - Sea Saba Underwater with Amy Lee
  • Wednesday, November 2nd - Digging Into Data: How to Use REEF's Database with REEF staff
  • Monday, Novemer 14th - Hawaii: Life in the Sand with Christy Pattengill-Semmens
  • Thursday, December 15thth - Don't Forget the Chubs and Progies! with Carlos and Allison Estape

Everyone, including divers, snorkelers, and devout landlubbers, is welcome to join in these free, online webinars. You don't need any special equipment (other than your computer or mobile device) to log on and join in. Be sure to visit www.REEF.org/fishinars to get more details and register for your favorite ones. We record all sessions for later viewing, and our archives are available for free viewing for REEF members.

March Membership Drive

We are kicking off March with REEF's third annual Month of Membership Madness. We have tons of great benefits this month for new members and for those who help us reach our goal of 500 new members in March. So help us spread the word - get your friends and family to join REEF today.

Every new member who joins in March 2017 will be entered to win one of several great prizes, including a Volunteer Fish Survey Project starter basket (includes an underwater slate, survey paper, color ID card, stuffed plush animal, REEF mask strap, REEF drink koozie, and more), and a Lionfish basket (includes the new lionfish cookbook, t-shirt, plush stuffed animal, lionfish puzzle, and more!) And every REEF member who refers a new member will also be entered to win. Just have the new member enter your name when they join by choosing "Other" under “How did you hear about REEF?”

For complete details and official rules, please visit www.REEF.org/membershipmadness.

Help grow REEF stronger and spread the word this March!

Advanced Assessment Team (AAT) Wrap-Up for July

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Upper Keys AAT: Mike Smith, Brian Hufford, Joe Cavanaugh, Marissa Nuttall, Lillian Kenney, Wayne Manning, and Brenda Hitt
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Middle Keys AAT: Brian Hufford, Joe Cavanaugh, Marissa Nuttall, Paige Switzer, Wayne Manning, Brenda Hitt, and Ann Outlaw
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Joe Cavanaugh, Brian Hufford, Dave Grenda, Erin Whitaker, Mike Phelan, and Brenda Hitt

REEF completed two Advanced Assessment Team (AAT) projects this past month, the Wellwood Monitoring Project and the Spiegel Grove Monitoring Project.  Many of you may not know about REEF's AAT program, please check this link to learn more about this very important REEF program.  Essentially, as REEF members gain more experience identifying fish and conducting surveys, they can move through our experience level testing and hopefully achieve expert status, after which time these members are invited to participate in special monitoring and assessment projects with REEF staff.  To learn more about our experience level testing, please click here.

Both the Wellwood and Spiegel projects were 5-year AAT assessments.  The M/V Wellwood, a 122-meter Cypriot-registered freighter, ran aground on August 4, 1984, on Molasses Reef off Key Largo, Florida. The ship impacted the reef's upper fore reef and remained aground for 12 days. The grounding destroyed 1,285 square meters of living corals and injured 644 square meters of coral reef framework.  In an effort to restore habitat structure and stability to the grounding site, restoration began in May 2002. REEF was contracted by the National Marine Sanctuary Program to document recruitment of fishes onto the site as well as the subsequent changes, if any, to surrounding reefs sites. Our final assessment was completed on July 29th.

The final Spiegel Grove AAT was completed on August 8th. The Spiegel Grove is a 510' LSD that was intentionally sunk as an artificial reef structure in the waters between Molasses Reef and Elbow Reef in Key Largo, Florida, in May 2002.  Previous to the May 16, 2006 sinking of the Oriskany (aircraft carrier), the Spiegel Grove was the largest ship ever intentionally scuttled to create an artificial reef.  Pursuant to the permit received by the Upper Keys Artificial Reef Foundation (UKARF) to sink the ship in National Marine Sanctuary waters, a plan for pre-deployment and periodic monitoring was implemented.  The UKARF contracted REEF to conduct pre-deployment and periodic monitoring of the Spiegel Grove and adjacent natural and artificial reef sites.  Monitoring documented fish presence/absence and relative abundance at 8 sites during 7 monitoring events in Year 1 and then bi-annually thereafter for four years. Thank you to all the AAT members, who over the past 5 years contributed to either of these survey efforts.

I also want to send out a BIG thank you to everyone who helped out on our AAT projects the past few weeks.  In addition to the Wellwood and Spiegel projects above, we completed our annual middle and upper Keys Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary assessments - 12 days straight!  Specifically, I would like to thank Horizon, Paradise, and Quiescence Divers dive shops, and the following individuals, a couple of whom did all 12 days of AAT project diving- Dave Grenda, Brenda Hitt, Brian Hufford, Lillian Kenney, Wayne Manning, Ann Outlaw, Mike Phelan, and our two past interns (newest AAT members) - Marissa Nuttall and Paige Switzer.

Our next AAT project will be the Biscayne National Park AAT in early October (team already assembled).  Also, the Hoyt Vandenberg will present an exciting and new AAT project for REEF beginning next year.  Currently the ship is being prepared for sinking in Norfolk, VA.  It's due to be brought down to the Keys in January (08) and deployed in early April, about 6 miles off the coast of Key West http://www.fla-keys.com/news/news.cfm?sid=1854 .  We are currently finalizing our monitoring plan for this vessel and will be monitoring this newest artificial reef over the next 5 years, beginning in early spring with a pre-deployment event.  You will hear more about this project in the coming months.

Hope to see you in the water soon.

Best "fishes,"

Joe

Design by Joanne Kidd, development by Ben Weintraub