Making It Count - September 2016

Putting It To Work: Who's Using REEF Data, September 2016

REEF population data on Goliath Grouper are currently being used by several different researchers and government agencies to help support the recovery of this threatened species. Photo by Lureen Ferretti.

Every month, scientists, government agencies, and other groups request raw data from REEF’s Fish Survey Project database. Here is a sampling of who has asked for REEF data recently and what they are using it for:

- Data on three large Caribbean parrotfish species were provided to a scientist at California State San Luis Obispo to evaluate status and trends in these declining species.

- Data to evaluate population densities of herbivores in Bahamas and Belize were provided to researchers from Georgia State University.

- Goliath Grouper data were provided to researchers from University of Florida to build a spatial model to look at grouper management options and to the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council to develop a Population Learning Model.

- Data on sea stars and sea urchins from the Pacific Northwest were provided to a researcher working with the Coastal Ocean Research Institute to report on the health of Howe Sound in British Columbia.

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The Faces of REEF: Kat Fenner

The Y-prickleback, one of Kat's favorite finds. Photo by Wendy Carey.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Kathleen Fenner. Kat has been a REEF member since 1999. She lives in British Columbia, Canada, and she is a member of the Pacific Advanced Assessment Team (a Level 5 Expert surveyor). She has also conducted surveys in the TWA and is a Level 3 Advanced surveyor there. To date, Kat has completed 178 surveys. Here’s what Kat had to say about REEF:

How did you find out about REEF?

I read about REEF years ago in a dive magazine and signed up. They shared my values of the ocean environment and citizen science. Over 10 years later I began doing surveys. At the Salish Sea Conference in 2011, employed by a NGO, I was able to dive with REEF and met Janna Nichols (REEF Outreach Coordinator). I was walked through my first survey. It helped that I had moved from the interior of British Columbia to Vancouver Island! I have completed many surveys since then. I’m so glad I met Janna who assisted me in getting started.

What inspires you to do REEF surveys?

I’m inspired to complete REEF surveys for personal benefit and for the future. I enjoy recording what I see, knowing I’ll be able to access that data at any time. It’s like having a super detailed log book always available. My awareness and knowledge base is increasing by doing surveys. Without thinking about it, I’m watching fish behavior and checking out fins and noticing many details. It’s exciting being able to see more when you are over 40! The future to me is my four grandchildren. I want them to have a beautiful ocean environment to enjoy and share with their children someday. I believe in what REEF does. The information in their data base can assist in better understanding and protection of our aquatic environment. Accurate information gathered by many is more beneficial than information gathered by a few.

What do you enjoy most about being a REEF member?

My favorite part of being a REEF member is access to free educational material. REEF gives you such great opportunities to learn. I love the fishinars, flash cards, quizzes and the great people that work for REEF that answer fishy questions. I’ve always been a bit of a fish geek but now I have an ongoing opportunity to learn and constantly increase my knowledge base.

Do you have any critter watching tips for others?

My tips for REEF members is to get an underwater camera, doesn’t have to be a great camera and get as many fishy ID books as you can. Having multiple resource books helps a lot with ID. More information assists in making a positive ID. A camera will let you look at the detail of a fish without it swimming away. Often I’ve made positive ID from a poor quality picture, but a picture that captured defining features.

What has been your favorite fish-find or underwater encounter?

Almost every dive is a fascinating fish encounter for me. I’m always seeing something new to me, whether it is a species or the species with eggs, or large schools, or juveniles but I almost always find something new. One fascinating encounter was the Y-Prickleback, positively identified from our low quality picture. It felt good to be able to report something that little information exists on.

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Summer Lionfish Derby Series a Success in 2016

REEF Lionfish staff, Emily Stokes, measuring a lionfish at a derby this summer. Photo by Sarah Schindehette.
A group of college students who created a Lionfish Derby team. Photo by Sarah Schindehette.
Local chefs prepare lionfish to be served at a REEF Derby.

This summer seemed to fly by, and along with it went REEF’s 2016 Summer Lionfish Derby Series! It was an exciting summer full of “firsts” for the derby program. We added a fourth derby to the series, which we hosted in Sarasota in partnership with Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium. We also hosted our first Lionfish Culinary Competition in conjunction with the Palm Beach County Lionfish Derby, held at Loggerhead Marinelife Center, with support from the NUISANCE Group and Chef Chris Sherrill. The Sarasota and Palm Beach County derbies were full weekend events rather than single day removals, which gave competitors more time to get to sites that aren’t fished as often and to maximize the amount of lionfish removed. To top it all off, the Fort Lauderdale Derby teams brought in an astounding 1,250 lionfish in a single day! In all, the teams removed 2,426 lionfish during the REEF Lionfish Derbies in 2016. A whopping 18,560 lionfish have been removed in all REEF Derbies since 2009. Way to go teams. More stats below.

2016 Summer Series Derby Stats

Total Lionfish Removed:

Sarasota (July 9th & 10th) = 429

Fort Lauderdale (July 16th) = 1,250

Palm Beach County (August 13th & 14th) = 337

Upper Keys (September 10th) = 323

Total Lionfish Removed During 2016 Derby Series = 2,426

Total Lionfish Removed from ALL REEF Derbies (since 2009) = 18,560

Largest Lionfish Caught = 427 mm (~16.8 inches)

Smallest Lionfish Caught = 24 mm (~.94 inches)

Thank you to all of our 2016 Derby sponsors who made this series possible, including Diver’s Direct, Evolve Diving, Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuaries, the Florida State Park Service, Ocean Reef Conservation Commission, and ZooKeeper! The 2016 Summer Lionfish Derby Series was funded in part by a grant awarded from Mote Marine Laboratory’s Protect Our Reefs Grants Program, which is funded by proceeds from the sale of the Protect Our Reefs specialty license plate. To learn more, visit www.mote.org/4reef.

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Another Fun Summer of Ocean Explorers Camp

REEF Summer Campers.

Over the summer, REEF hosted the second year of Ocean Explorers Summer Camp, a marine science camp designed to get kids outdoors and on the water. 57 campers joined us over 4 weeks of camp, and it was a blast! Led by REEF Education Program Manager, Ellie Splain, and assisted by our wonderful Marine Conservation Interns, each week was filled with fun and interesting activities. Campers snorkeled at the coral reef, kayaked through the mangroves, dissected squid, created lionfish jewelry, and even got up close and personal with some animal visitors! Above all, campers learned about conservation and what each of us can do to protect the environment and make a difference. Keep a look out for the REEF Ocean Explorers 2017 Summer Camp date announcement! For more information, visit www.REEF.org/explorers/camp.

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More Fishinars Coming Soon

Flagtail Tilefish, one of the many great fish you can find in the sand in Hawaii. Photo by Barry Fackler.

Don't miss these great Fishinars (www.REEF.org/fishinars) we are offering this fall!

  • Tuesday, October 4th - Sea Saba Underwater with Amy Lee
  • Wednesday, November 2nd - Digging Into Data: How to Use REEF's Database with REEF staff
  • Monday, Novemer 14th - Hawaii: Life in the Sand with Christy Pattengill-Semmens
  • Thursday, December 15thth - Don't Forget the Chubs and Progies! with Carlos and Allison Estape

Everyone, including divers, snorkelers, and devout landlubbers, is welcome to join in these free, online webinars. You don't need any special equipment (other than your computer or mobile device) to log on and join in. Be sure to visit www.REEF.org/fishinars to get more details and register for your favorite ones. We record all sessions for later viewing, and our archives are available for free viewing for REEF members.

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Check Out New Items In REEF Store - Lionfish Jewelry, Mask Straps, and More

If you haven't checked out the online REEF Store lately, you might want to head over and get a jump on your holiday shopping! We have added several new items, including Lionfish Jewelry Making Kits, pre-made Lionfish Jewelry Pieces, REEF Mask Straps, several new T-shirts, and a lionfish polespear. And be sure to check out our new Conservation Creatures plush series. Each plush comes with a Conservation Card that provides information about the critter's habitat, characteristics, potential threats, and global distribution in REEF's Survey Project regions. Visit www.REEF.org/store today!

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