REEF Restores Historic Water Tower on Headquarters Property

The historic water tower at REEF HQ, restored to it's original state.
The water tower before restoration.
REEF interns helping with the restoration of the water tower.

Restoration of a unique historic water cistern was recently completed at REEF Headquarters in Key Largo, FL. REEF’s Headquarters is located in the building that was originally the home of William Beauregart Albury, one of the earliest settlers of the Florida Keys. In August 2012, the Historical Preservation Society of the Upper Keys designating the building as a Key Largo historic site and “the oldest Key Largo home in its original location built in 1913.” As its original tenant, Mr. Albury lived in the residence for forty-two years. The building has subsequently undergone various commercial proprietary changes before it was purchased by REEF in 2001.

Adjacent to the former residence were the remains of a wooden cistern built around the time of the home’s construction. This one-time functioning cistern was used to collect and store rainwater which then was used to supply freshwater to the home’s inhabitants. Prior to 1942, Florida Keys early settlers would often use cisterns alongside their homes before freshwater could be transported to the Keys via Flagler’s Railroad or through a pipeline from the mainland.

Over the past nine months, REEF volunteers and partners have restored the water cistern. All of the original lumber was salvaged, restored and used in the reconstructed cistern. The cistern holds important cultural and historical significance as a unique architectural structure used by early Key Largo settlers. Later this year REEF will create interpretive signage detailing the history of cistern use in the Upper Keys in the early twentieth century by area residents and plans a ribbon cutting event when the restoration is completed. Special thanks to the Historic Florida Keys Foundation’s for funding materials in the restoration project and Jerry Wilkinson of the Historical Preservation Society of the Upper Keys and James Scurlock of Mother Ocean Custom Woodworks for their leadership and the hundreds of hours of hard work volunteering their time for this project.

The Faces of REEF: Roger and Tricia Grimes

Roger and Patricia doing their part in the lionfish invasion. Photo by Leslie Adams.
The Mola mola, one of the oddest fish in the sea. And a great find! Photo courtesy of Wikicommons.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Roger and Tricia Grimes. They have been REEF members since 2012, shortly after moving to the Florida Keys. They are active with REEF's lionfish research efforts, and they also lend their technology talents around REEF Headquarters. Roger is eligible to have his volunteer hours matched by his employer (Microsoft), resulting in generous financial support to REEF. Here's what they had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF? 

We first heard about REEF when we were taking one of the first lionfish harvesting classes in Morehead City, NC. We liked REEF so much it was partially responsible for us moving to Key Largo a few years ago.

What ways are you involved with REEF?

Our main participation with REEF is with the Lionfish project. We also work to keep the REEF office computers up and running. Our highlights are all the lionfish dives we’ve done with REEF interns, Lad Akins, and the many great volunteers. Really great people! We haven’t done an official REEF survey dive yet. We’ve taken a few of the online REEF Fishinars, and they have really improved our ability to identify fish. Every new fish we see gets recorded in our copy of Reef Fish Identification. One of our life goals is to see every fish in the book!

What is your favorite part about being a REEF member? If you had to explain REEF to a friend in a couple of sentences, what would you tell them?

REEF is a special group of people with big hearts and scientific minds who dedicate a big part of their lives protecting parts of the ocean. REEF makes a big impact through its educational outreach, sharing science, and identifying ways to make the oceans better for everyone. Everything we do for REEF makes us feel like a more complete one human family! 

Do you dive close to where you live? What is the best part about diving there?

We moved to Key Largo three years ago and purposely bought a house on an ocean canal and bought a boat. We go diving every chance we get.

Do you have any fishwatching tips for REEF members?

We’ve noticed that wary fish watch your eyes. If you want to get close to a wary fish, be patient, don’t chase them directly, and advert your eyes until the last possible second.

What is your most memorable fish find?

Seeing a mola mola out in the clear bluewater. I (Roger) was a relatively new diver and I thought I was seeing the closest thing to a dinosaur. I thought I was bent. How could a fish be shaped like a hand? And I’ve never seen one since then, so I now know what a special treat it was.

REEF Fest 2015 -Don't Miss It!

REEF Fest fun!

Join us in Key Largo this fall for REEF Fest 2015, September 24 - 27. Celebrate the success and impact of REEF's marine conservation programs and education initiatives with diving, learning, and parties. Festivities begin Thursday with afternoon seminars and then a welcome party at the Caribbean Club. Friday and Saturday are full days, with diving in the mornings, seminars in the afternoons, and social events in the evenings (Friday Open House at REEFHQ and Saturday Celebration Dinner Party). The fun wraps up on Sunday with more organized dives. All REEF Fest events are open to the public. Complete details on the schedule, including the lineup of seminars, diving opportunities, and social gatherings, as well as travel logistics and hotel arrangements, are available online at www.REEF.org/REEFFest2015.

REEF Fest: Explore. Discover. Make a Difference. Celebrating Marine Conservation in the Florida Keys!

Golden Hamlet Inductions in 2015

The Golden Hamlet. Drawing by Eleanore Pigman.

We are pleased to welcome two REEF surveyors to the Golden Hamlet Club in 2015 – Georgia Arrow and Janna Nichols. What is the Golden Hamlet Club? No, it is not a club of Shakespearean enthusiasts, but rather a club of citizen scientist superstars - those REEF members who have conducted 1,000+ surveys in the REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project. Georgia was the first member to complete almost all of the 1,000 surveys in the chilly waters of the Pacific Northwest. Although many of Janna’s surveys were also conducted in the Pacific Northwest, as REEF’s Outreach Coordinator, Janna has conducted surveys in almost all of REEF’s project regions. She recently did her 1,000th on the Cozumel REEF Field Survey.

The very first Golden Hamlet member was Linda Baker, achieving the status in 2005. Today, there are eighteen members of the Golden Hamlet Club. A plaque hangs at REEF HQ in Key Largo, with the names of our honored volunteer surveyors -- Lad Akins, Georgia Arrow, Linda Baker, Judie Clee, Janet Eyre, Dave Grenda, Doug Harder, Lillian Kenney, Peter Leahy, Rob McCall, Franklin Neal, Janna Nichols, Mike Phelan, Bruce Purdy, Linda Ridley, Dee Scarr, Linda Schillinger, and Sheryl Shea. Congratulations to you all. To see pictures and profiles of these surveyors, visit the Golden Hamlet Club webpage. Thanks to their dedication, and those of the 16,000 other volunteers who have participated in the Survey Project since its inception in 1993, we have generated the largest marine fish sightings database in the world. Who's going to be the next Golden Hamlet surveyor?

The Faces of REEF: David Thompson and Luanne Betz

David and Luanne in the Philippines
Exploring topside
David surveying in the Caribbean.
David and Luanne with friends on a REEF Trip.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight one of our many REEF couples - David Thompson and Luanne Betz, members since 2011. David and Luanne have collectively conducted 250 surveys and are active surveyors in several REEF regions. Both have achieved Level 5 Expert status in the TWA and Level 3 status in the CIP. Here's what they had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF or become a REEF member? We love diving and having been married in Key Largo under the sea it was a natural fit for us. We first heard about REEF from a fellow REEF member, Penny Hall and in 2011 we signed up as members and started our fish education online. In April 2012 we completed our first survey on the Nevis REEF trip led by Dr. Christy Semmens and we were hooked!

If you have been on a REEF Field Survey, where and what was your trip highlight? We have been on many! Caribbean destinations include Nevis/St Kitts, St Lucia, Utila/Honduras, Curacao, and we are going on the Bonaire trip this fall. Our favorite trip so far was to the Philippines. The highlight was when a Whale Shark unexpectedly emerged from a massive school of Bigeye Trevally. Tubbataha marine preserve was the most fascinating place we’ve ever experienced; the diversity of life was mind-blowing. We have also attended all of the REEF Fests in Key Largo.

What inspires you to complete REEF surveys? Learning about the fish and fish ID has added a whole new aspect to our diving. We love watching the fish behavior, the changes at night, and seeing how many different species we can find.

What is the most interesting thing you’ve learned doing a REEF fish survey? While on the field survey in the Philippines we learned the Three-spot and Reticulated Dascyllus make a throated buzz that sounds like a cat purr when defending their territory.

What is your favorite part about being a REEF member? We love having an expansion to a hobby we already loved. REEF has given us many new friends. We actually have gone on vacations with members we have met on REEF survey field teams. And they have stayed with us to go diving locally or just to visit. We also joined other REEF members in Hawaii last April. We also introduced REEF to our children and that has expanded our participation with them as well. Our son, Landen, went on a lionfish trip to Curacao with us and proved to be a very good shot!

If you had to explain REEF to a friend in a couple of sentences, what would you tell them? REEF is a citizen science program in which we are active participants. They have many programs to participate in, including invasive lionfish control and study, the Grouper Moon Project, and provide a giant database for scientists to monitor sea life around the world.

Do you dive close to where you live, and if so, what is the best part about diving there? We love to dive near our home in Coral Springs, FL. We are close enough to dive in the Keys, Delray, Boynton, and West Palm. Our favorite local spot is (of course!) Blue Heron Bridge.

What is your most memorable fish find and why? Is there a fish (or marine invertebrate) you haven’t seen yet diving, but would like to? Black Brotula in St. Lucia, Ghost Pipefish in Dumagete, Philippines, and flouders mating in Tubbataha. Still on our wish list — Manta Rays!

Exciting Opportunity to Sleep Under the Sea

We are excited to share with you a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to join REEF on a special expedition next spring. In partnershp with Florida International Univeristy (FIU), we have arranged for a small team of REEF members to experience another level of ocean exploration. Our team will venture beneath the waves and spend a night in the FIU Aquarius Reef Base, the world’s only undersea research laboratory. Deployed 60 feet beneath the surface in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, the Aquarius Reef Base is the world’s only undersea research station and is used to study the ocean, test and develop undersea technology, and train astronauts. Less than 1,500 people have ever ventured inside Reef Aquarius Base, and even fewer have spent the night in the underwater habitat.

The project dates are March 5 - 10, 2017, and includes 4 nights of lodging in Marriott Bayside Resort in Key Largo, 3 days of 2-tank dives with Quiescence Diving Services, a night spent in the Aquarius Reef Base, and classroom sessions with REEF and Aquarius staff each day. Note that the time spent in the Aquarius is not a saturation dive. The pressure inside Aquarius will be adjusted during the overnight stay, and participants will not be allowed to venture outside of the Habitat until departure from the Habitat. Cost to participate is $4,500. If you are interested in finding out more, visit the Aquarius Expedition website.

Fishinars Coming Up - Galapagos, Roatan, and more!

The Galapagos Blue-banded Goby, is one of the many endemic species that will be discussed in the upcoming Fishinar. Photo by Paul Humann.

We have some fantastic Fishinars coming up in the next few months, and we’d like for you to join us. Fishinars, REEF's brand of online webinars, are live, fun, interactive, and educational. Never boring! They last one hour, and you can log on from your home computer or mobile device.

Our next Fishinar in May (Wednesday the 3rd) will focus on “Fish in the Land of Finches: Galapagos”, and will be taught by our Science Director Christy Semmens. After that, shift your focus to a favorite destination of divers, Roatan, when Scott and Patti Chandler teach the Fishes of Roatan on Thursday May 11th.

You can register and get more information on these and other great Fishinars scheduled for 2017 by going to: www.REEF.org/fishinars. ‘Sea’ you online!

The Great Annual Fish Count is in Full Swing!

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GAFC Event at Biscayne National Park 7/21/07

7/7/07 marked a successful GAFC Kickoff Party here at the REEF Headquarters, while across the country in Seattle, people gathered to celebrate the art, ecology, and culture of Puget Sound at the Puget Soundscape. Environmental groups were welcomed to this event to share each of their unique contributions to conservation. The renowned Foster/White Art Gallery of Seattle arranged an event in the afternoon dedicated to linking the gap between art and nature through “watchable wildlife.” Master Artist, Tony Angell spoke at the event along with our Director of Science, Christy Semmens, who shared information about the Great Annual Fish Count and REEF’s mission . The gallery generously agreed to donate a portion of the proceeds from the event to REEF.

So far, over half of the registered events have already been completed, and we are eager to hear back of their success. We would like to extend great thanks to all of the coordinators, and best wishes to those coordinators whose events are coming up very soon. Events and their locations still to come include:

California: Discount Dive Trips for the entire month of July hosted by Paradise Dive Club, Santa Barbara, CA

US Northeast/New England: Fish Count Dives onJuly 28th conducted by the New England Aquarium Dive Club, Gloucester, MA;

Caribbean and Bahamas: Weekly multimedia fish ID classes held at CoCo View Resort, Roatan, Honduras through August 4th.

For all of you Great Annual Fish Fanatics who have participated in fish seminars across the country, thank you for your support and don’t forget that you can complete fish survey dives anytime!

REEF Parts - Things To Know

Here are a few notes and news bits we'd like you to know about:

  • Field Survey Update (2007-2008)

    Thanks to all who have made the beginning of our 2007 Field Survey year a successful start!  There are still spaces available on two of our upcoming (see below).  Keep an eye out for our 2008 Field Survey Schedule  coming out soon in ENews!

    WOODS HOLE (Sept 11-16, 2007) - Woods Hole and other New England sites – we have a few spaces left on this first-ever New England Field Survey led by myself, a self-proscribed New Englander. We will be diving Woods Hole, historic Plymouth of Mayflower fame, the historic fishing port of Gloucester, and Martha’s Vineyard. Our accommodations are in the village of Woods Hole that boasts 37 past Nobel laureates. The water temperature will be in the mid 70’s for all but two of our dives and we are sure to see some tropical fish mixed in with the temperate fishes. We will meet some of our New England counterparts in and out of the water. Please join us if you can.

    BONAIRE (September 22-29, 2007) – There are 7 spots left on this unique trip led by Ned and Anna DeLoach. Bonaire is a wonderful place to learn your fish ID and benefit from two world experts in fish/invert ID and behavior. Bonaire deservedly boasts some of the best diving in the tropical western Atlantic and you’ll see many species on every dive with no worries about navigation while you gently dive out to the reef wall and turn left or right and follow the wall back. The shore diving is magnificent and you’ll want to take advantage of Ned and Anna’s underwater naturalist acumen and great conversations and stories. Eight of our top ten sites for species richness in the TWA database are from Bonaire. Hope to see you there!

    To sign up for either one of these trips, contact Travel for You at 1-888-363-3345 or email reef@travelforyouinc.com

  • Going on a trip? Order Scan forms, underwater survey paper, books, and other items at the REEF online store.

 

Final Report on Five-Year Spiegel Grove Assessment

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Note the encrusting organisms after just 5 years and the Purple Reeffish, Photo by Mike Ryan
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Invertebrate community recruitment to the Spiegel structure, Photo by Mike Ryan
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Blackfin Snapper school on Spiegel Grove, Photo by Mike Ryan
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Large Arrow Crab, Photo by Mike Ryan
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Midnight Parrotfish and Bluehead Wrasses, Photo by Mike Ryan
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Cubera Snapper on Spiegel, Photo by Alison Johnson

This past summer, REEF completed its 5-year monitoring and assessment of the ex-Navy Landing Ship Dock, U.S.S. Spiegel Grove, intentionally deployed in 130' deep water as an artificial reef off Key Largo in June of 2002. At the time of its sinking, the Spiegel, at 510' in length, was the largest vessel intentionally sunk as an artificial reef. More recently, REEF completed its final report on the data collected, largely through members' efforts in the water these last few years, so a multus gratia (big thank you) from all of us at REEF to those of you who participated on the Advanced Assessment Team monitoring of the Spiegel. This was every bit your project as much as ours. I am asked quite often in the field how REEF surveyor efforts contribute to science, conservation, and education so I want to share with you some of our findings as the Spiegel assessment serves as a great example of the power of concerned and active citizen scientists to effect positive changes in our communities. For a full viewing of our final report, please visit our website at 5 Year Spiegel Grove Monitoring .

Before I highlight a few of our findings, let's go over what our methods were for conducting our Spiegel assessment. Surveys were conducted using the Roving Diver Technique (RDT), a non-point visual survey method that serves as the mainstay for most REEF efforts in the water. The purpose of this method is to gather a comprehensive species list with sighting frequency and relative abundance estimates, for fish species only in the case of this study. Staff and REEF volunteers all had to be members of the Advanced Assessment Team (AAT) for REEF (learn more about how to become an AAT member http://www.reef.org/programs/volunteersurvey/aat). Each monitoring event consisted of 4 days of two-tank monitoring dives at the Spiegel Grove and 7 surrounding reference sites.

The overall objective of the study was to assess any changes in fish community structure over time with the addition of the newly deployed artificial reef, changes not just to the Spiegel site, but changes to the surrounding natural reef sites as well. A central biological question as to the merits of vessel type artificial reef deployments is whether or not they add fish species in terms of both numbers of fish (biomass) and numbers of fish species (biodiversity) to the artificial reef and the surrounding natural reef sites. In other words, in the Field of Dreams metaphor, if you build it will they come and where will they come from? Ultimately, resource managers and other stakeholders hope that the addition of the artificial reef adds fish not only to the targeted site, but seeds surrounding reefs with the reproductive output from the resident fish population. The scale of these questions cannot be adequately addressed in a 5-year pilot study such as the one REEF just completed and that was not our charge but it is important to understand the concept behind sinking ships as artificial reefs. And we should commend Monroe County, the Upper Keys Artificial Reef Foundation (UKARF), and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS) for funding this initial pilot study. A second socioeconomic question not addressed in REEF's work asks the important question of how much SCUBA diving pressure is decreased on natural reefs by the addition of a top recreational dive site such as the Spiegel and how much additional tourist revenue is gained? Finding answers to both the biological and economic questions above are critical in providing guidance for future marine resource management decisions on whether or not to deploy artificial reefs of this type and when and where the sinking of these large retired vessels is appropriate.

Okay, some quick highlights but again for the full report, please visit our website. Over the 5-year study, REEF conducted 76 RDT surveys on the Spiegel itself and another 445 survey dives on the surrounding 7 reference sites. 191 fish species were documented on the Spiegel Grove for all surveys combined. 46 species of fish were observed on the Spiegel just one month after deployment with the average number of species climbing to 76 per monitoring event thereafter. Approximately 3 years after deployment (Aug 2005), persistence in species composition at the Spiegel Grove site through time had increased to levels closer to those of the surrounding reefs. Striped grunts and Tomtates were immediate arrivals on the newly deployed site. Currently, 5 years post deployment, fish species composition on the Spiegel site is more akin to what you would expect on a deeper reef site including schools of Blackfin Snapper, Creole Wrasses, Bluehead Wrasses, Purple Reeffish, Sunshinefish, Bluerunners, Yellowtail Reeffish, Greenblotch Parrotfish, Tomtates, Spotfin Hogfish, Yellowmouth Grouper, Black Grouper, and the Federally protected Golilath Grouper (for a complete list of species sighted and statistical comparisons between study sites take a peak at the report). Blackcap and Fairy Basslets rarely occur in the Keys but interestingly, on several occasions, both have been surveyed on the Spiegel, most notably after hurricane storm surges from offshore. Of course, the Spiegel originally sunk on its starboard side was righted during Hurricane Dennis in July of 2005, confounding results of our survey shortly thereafter. And large, deeply sunk vessels such as this one certainly offer numerous hiding places to groupers in particular, making full visual assessments difficult. We have included in our report suggestions for future studies as well.

REEF would like to thank Mike Ryan of Horizon Divers for supplying important anectodal information about the Spiegel. He was one of the first divers on the newly deployed vessel and has logged more than 240 dives on site since then, meticulously recording fish and invertebrate sightings in the true naturalist vein. Also, REEF thanks Quiesscence Divers and Horizon Divers and Scott Fowler for providing boat and logistical support for all of our diving efforts over the past 5 years. This spring (2008), the Hoyt Vandenberg is scheduled for deployment a few miles off the coast of Key West. REEF will be leading the monitoring efforts over a similar 5-year time period and we'll keep you posted on our efforts. Two suggested readings are referenced in our report, one by Arena et al (2007) and the other by Leeworthy et al (2006) assessing biological and economic impacts of artificial reefs, respectively.

Happy Holidays everyone and if you are visiting Key Largo next year, visit the wreck and see for yourself how things are coming along.

 

Design by Joanne Kidd, development by Ben Weintraub