Upcoming Fishinars Include Guest Instructors, Ray Troll and Dr. Milton Love

Marine life artist and author, Ray Troll, will be giving a REEF Fishinar on April 16th

Our 2014 Fishinar schedule is off to a great start! We've got lots of exciting, fun, and educational REEF Fishinars in store for you this year - featuring your favorite instructors and special guests alike. Check out the full schedule at www.REEF.org/fishinars. Fishinars coming up include:

  • Top 25 Fish of Roatan - Special ScubaBoard Session - Jonathan Lavan, March 20th
  • Butterflies and Angels: Kings and Queens of the Reef - Jonathan Lavan, April 1st
  • A Few Mind-Blowing Fish Every Ichthyo-Geek Should Know About - Ray Troll, April 16th
  • What I Did On My Fall Vacation – Research on the Fishes of Southern California Oil/Gas Platforms - Dr. Milton Love, April 22nd

REEF Fishinars are a free benefit of REEF membership, and did you know that REEF members can also access and view any of our archived Fishinars from previous years? A great way for new fish surveyors to learn, or for experienced fish surveyors to brush up on their ID skills.

Explore our Fishinar webpage, register for the sessions you like, and we'll see you online!

The Faces of REEF: Janet Eyre

Happy after doing a survey in Fiji.
Janet with fellow "fish nerds" Doug Harder and Kreg Martin.
Surveying in Hawaii.
The amazing Madarinfish. Photo by Luc Viatour.
Checking over her data after a dive.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Janet Eyre. Janet has been a REEF member since 2002, and has conducted 1,125 surveys. She is on the Advanced Assessment Team as an Expert Surveyor in four of REEF’s regions! Janet happily describes herself as a true fish nerd, and she has taken a lead role in assisting with REEF’s expansions to the tropical western Pacific. Here's what Janet had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF or become a REEF member?

A letter from REEF in 2001 was my first exposure to the organization. The letter mentioned the Advanced Assessment Team (AAT) Expert Surveyor program and I remember thinking “wow, that would be cool to dive, count fish, AND do something good for the planet all at the same time.” So, on my next dive trips to the Caribbean in 2002 and 2003, with Reef Fish Identification: Florida, Caribbean, Bahamas in hand, I started doing REEF surveys. On my first REEF Field Survey Trip, to Belize in 2003, I tested into the Caribbean AAT. I also started doing surveys in Hawaii, and ended up as an Expert AAT surveyor there in 2004. I have conducted the majority of my surveys on the Kona Coast of the Big Island (Hawaii) where I am lucky to be able to dive with a group of like-minded friends and professionals at Jack’s Diving Locker. We all love diving deep as well as bobbing around in the surge zone in the search for as many species as possible on every dive.

Do you have a favorite REEF highlight or experience to share?

Even before REEF officially started the Survey Project in the South Pacific, I had been sending in the species lists from my Pacific trips. Now that the South Pacific is a “REEF Zone,” I have attained the top surveyor status in that region. The highlight of my REEF survey “career” came on the Field Survey Trip to Fiji in May 2013 when I counted 233 species on one dive! What a rush that was! It was also on that trip that I did my 1,000th REEF survey, so it was a double- milestone trip.

What inspires you to complete REEF surveys?

I come by my “fish nerdiness” honestly – my parents and grandparents were all birders. I never got into that, but once I started diving I was fascinated by identifying the fish, which I realize is basically underwater birding. I can (and do) spend hours just “reading” fish ID books.

Surveying for REEF is a passion for me because it satisfies me on several different fronts – (1) challenging me to find as many fish on a dive as I can, (2) giving me a reason and the means to learn to identify more fish, (3) doing something good for the planet, and (4) making each and every dive a new adventure (which gets harder and harder to do after 1,700 dives).

Do you have a favorite fish find or a fish quest?

One of my favorite fish is the Mandarinfish – its color pattern is just so incredible and gorgeous! I get a total charge out of seeing any “new-to-me” species but there are some fish I really would like to see – Psychedelic Frogfish, Gurnard Lionfish, Helfrich’s Dartfish, and Mola Mola (Sunfish) are at the top of that list.

Last Chance to Donate and Receive Limited Edition Print of Goliath Grouper

Thank you to everyone who supported REEF during our annual fundraising campaign! With your help, we raised enough to continue our critical marine conservation programs in 2015. These programs make a huge IMPACT worldwide and protect iconic species, such as Goliath Grouper, Nassau Grouper, manta and mobula rays, parrotfish, and rockfish. REEF also protects ocean habitats through addressing invasive species like the Indo-pacific Red lionfish.

Saturday, February 28th is the last chance to donate to REEF's annual fundraising campaign - and receive my limited edition Goliath Grouper print. For more information on how I captured this amazing moment, please check out www.REEF.org/impact. Don't miss this opportunity to share a once in a lifetime moment I was lucky enough to witness with these gentle giants of the sea.

Thank you again for your support! We rely on individual donors so we can provide quality data to researchers and scientists who are exploring our underwater world. With your help, I look forward to another year of ocean adventure and discovery!

Putting it to Work: New Publication Updating Fishes of Alligator Reef in the Florida Keys

Tessellated Blenny, Hypsoblennius invemar, one of the 41 species added to the species inventory of Alligator Reef as part of the publication. Photo by Carlos Estapé.
Allison Estapé, one of the paper's co-authors surveying in the Florida Keys. Photo by Carlos Estapé.
Spotfin Jawfish, Opistognathus robins, one of the 41 species added to the species inventory of Alligator Reef as part of the publication. Photo by Carlos Estapé.
Carlos and Allison Estapé, active REEF volunteers and co-authors on a new paper on the Fishes of Alligator Reef.

We are excited to share a new publication recently co-authored by active REEF volunteers, Carlos and Allison Estapé. Carlos and Allison are members of REEF's Advanced Assessment Team and were honored as REEF's Volunteers of the Year in 2013. In that same year, Carlos and Allison became aware of an extensive historical study that had been conducted documenting the fishes of Alligator Reef, which happened to be their "home" reef. From 1958-67, Walter A. Starck II conducted marine biological studies and fish collection efforts in the area of Alligator Reef, off of Islamorada in the Florida Keys. In 1968, he published A List of Fishes of Alligator Reef.

After reading Stark's study, Carlos and Allison undertook a four-year census of the fishes of the area with a goal to photo-document as many of their sightings as possible. This effort subsequently entailed 1,039 combined dives devoted to fish counts, photographic documentation, or both. During these surveys, they photographed 278 of the species reported by Starck (1968) plus 35 additional and/or newly described or reclassified species not recorded in the earlier study. During this time, Carlos and Allison started working with Dr. Stark to update the classic publication. The updated paper was published in Journal of the Ocean Science Foundation in August 2017.

An update of the checklist of fishes of Alligator Reef and environs some fifty years later provides an unparalleled opportunity to evaluate the species richness for a limited reef area, as well as a unique opportunity to explore changes in diversity over a half-century time scale. In the updated study, the authors added 107 species and subtracted 5 from the original total of 516 species: thus the checklist now totals 618 species, of 122 families, the most recorded for any similarly sized area in the New World. The additional species records are made up from a number of subsequent collections as well as from Carlos and Allison's sightings. Over the half-century since the original Alligator Reef survey, there have been great advances in the taxonomy of Greater Caribbean reef fishes, with numerous changes in scientific names and classification. These changes were addressed in the updated publication so as to bring the list to current status.

The authors used the REEF database for analysis and comparison including three photos from Ed Martin, also a REEF member. REEF maintains an online database of worldwide visual fish-count surveys conducted by volunteer researchers and fish-count enthusiasts. While such surveys can be biased towards easily observed species, they are indicative for a large portion of the reef fish fauna and comprise a valuable source of comparative information (Schmitt & Sullivan 1996, Pattengill-Semmens & Semmens 2003, Holt et al. 2013). The local REEF data includes that of the Estapés, who have conducted 185 roving-diver REEF surveys on Alligator Reef. An additional 1,807 surveys at 94 sites in the study area have also been conducted by other REEF volunteers (as of July, 3, 2016).

To view a link to the Stark and Estapé paper, as well as all other publications that have included REEF data and projects, visit www.REEF.org/db/publications.

Putting It To Work: New Study Looks at Spawning Aggregation Population Genetics

The largest known spawning aggregation of Nassau Grouper in the Caribbean, found in the Cayman Islands, is the focus of REEF's Grouper Moon Project. Photo by Jim Hellemn.

A new publication in the scientific journal, Coral Reefs, evaluates population genetics of spawning aggregations and the role of juvenile recruitment, from both local and external sources, in sustaining and increasing local aggregations. The study included information from REEF's Grouper Moon Project in the Cayman Islands.

Like many places throughout the Caribbean, Nassau Grouper spawning aggregations in the US Virgin Islands were overfished until their disappearance in the 1970s and 1980s. In the early 2000s, however, Nassau Grouper were found gathering at Grammanik Bank, USVI, a mesophotic coral reef adjacent to one of the extinct aggregation sites, and regulatory protective measures were implemented to protect this fledgling aggregation. The authors of this study addressed two objectives: 1) which factors (local vs. external recruitment) are important in shaping recovery of the USVI spawning aggregations, and 2) the impact of severe past overfishing on the genetic structure of the Gremmanik Bank aggregation. For this second objective, REEF Grouper Moon Project scientists provided genetic samples from individual Nassau Grouper taken from the Little Cayman spawning aggregation, a much larger and less impacted aggregation.

No population structure was detected between the USVI and Cayman spawning aggregations. Additionally, the USVI spawning population showed signs of a genetic bottleneck, typical of greatly reduced populations. These collective results suggest that external recruitment is an important driver of the USVI spawning aggregation recovery. These findings also provide a baseline for future genetic monitoring of the spawning aggregations. The paper, titled "The ups and downs of coral reef fishes: the genetic characteristics of a formerly severely overfished but currently recovering Nassau grouper fish spawning aggregation", was published earlier this month in the March 2016 issue of Coral Reefs. Grouper Moon scientist, Dr. Brice Semmens, was a co-author on the paper. To find out more about this study and to see a list of all publications that have included REEF projects, visit www.REEF.org/db/publications.

Intern Spotlight: Meet Our Fall 2016 Interns

Our Fall 2016 Marine Conservation Interns!

This month, we are excited to introduce you to our Fall 2016 interns, who are a part of our Marine Conservation Internship Program. Since 1994, REEF has hosted over 110 interns. Our internship program has expanded over the years and our interns serve an important role in the day-to-day management at REEF. The internship provides an array of diverse experiences including scientific diving, outreach and education, data collection and management, non-profit operations, and public speaking.

A big welcome to our new Fall 2016 interns:

Emily Volkmann (from Grafton, Wisconsin), recent graduate from Smith College, BA in Biology and Environmental Science and Policy

Ellie Place (from Bellevue, Washington), recent graduate from Brown University, BA in Geological Sciences and Hispanic Studies

Katherine Ilcken (from Tampa, Florida), recent graduate from University of Florida, BS Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

Thomas Hyduk (from Central New Jersey), recent graduate from University of Miami, BS in Marine and Atmospheric Science

For more information about our interns, please visit www.REEF.org/internship/interns.

Putting It To Work: New Publication Out of the Grouper Moon Project

Results from the study authored by J Egerton et al shows the visualization provided by the hydroacoustic technology used to evaluate size and location of the Nassau Grouper spawning aggregation off Little Cayman. Figure (c) Coral Reefs, 2017.
A team of REEF scientists and volunteers have visually monitored the Little Cayman spawning aggregation annually since 2002. Photo by Phil Bush.

A new publication in the scientific journal Coral Reefs was recently issued based on science conducted as part of REEF's Grouper Moon Project. The paper, titled "Hydroacoustics for the discovery and quantification of Nassau grouper (Epinephelus stratus) spawning aggregations", summarizes results from work conducted during the 2014 Grouper Moon Project field season in the Cayman Islands. Led by Jack Egerton from Bangor University in the UK, the research focused on the use of hydroacoustic technology as a means to monitor the status and ecology of fish spawning aggregations. Egerton was assisted by Grouper Moon scientists, Dr. Brice Semmens and Dr. Scott Heppell, as well as Grouper Moon collaborators from the Cayman Islands Department of Environment. Using a split-beam echo sounder, data were used to visualize and estimate fish abundance and biomass at three Nassau Grouper spawning aggregations in the Cayman Islands. The estimates were compared with diver-collected data. Additionally, the technology was used to examine fish aggregation locations in relation to protected zones.

Patterns in the acoustic abundance matched that observed by the visual estimates reported by our Grouper Moon diver teams - total numbers found at the Little Cayman aggregation were significanly higher than the depeleted aggregations found on Grand Cayman and Cayman Brac. 

Spawning aggregation location examined with reference to seasonal marine protected areas (Designated Grouper Spawning Areas) showed that the aggregations were partially outside these areas at Grand Cayman and very close to the boundary at Cayman Brac. The aggregation on Little Cayman appears to be contained within the protected zone (at least in 2014). However, we know from other Grouper Moon Project data that the fish spend a lot of time traveling in and out of the zone during the day. Additionally, in 2015, the aggregation on Little Cayman shifted a significant distance to the north of the historical location and partially out of the protected zone. The results of this study show the importance of making use of many different approaches for monitoring and aggregations in order to most effectively inform future management of aggregating fish species.

To read more about this study and others that have been published based on REEF's programs, visit www.REEF.org/db/publications. To learn more about the Grouper Moon Project, visit www.REEF.org/groupermoonproject.

Donate Today to Support Ocean Conservation!

Your donation will help ensure that REEF can continue our critical ocean conservation work, including our Grouper Moon Project. Photo by Joshua Stewart.
REEF is undertaking an ambitious transformation of the Headquarters Campus this summer. Get your name engraved on a brick in the "Pathway to Ocean Conservation".

On World Oceans Day, REEF kicked off our annual summer fundraising campaign. Thanks to our largest matching opportunity ever, every donation made this summer will be matched dollar for dollar up to $150,000! We are almost halfway to our goal, but we need your help so that we may continue to grow and build REEF’s ocean conservation legacy. Every donation makes a difference – donate today at www.REEF.org/contribute.

We recently announced our exciting plans to expand the REEF Campus in Key Largo, Florida. This transformation includes adding an Interpretive Center building, installing new educational exhibits in the existing REEF Headquarters building, and creating a Native Plants Trail. This facility will engage 40,000 visitors annually while furthering our mission and supporting new programs.

As a special thank you, donors of $500 or more this summer will be honored with a personalized brick in the "Pathway to Ocean Conservation" that we are installing in front of REEF Headquarters as part of our campus expansion. Two sizes of brick are available (4” by 8” - $500 donation, 8” x 8” – $1,000 donation) and each can be personalized with an inscription of your choosing! Brick donations must be made by August 14th.

To find out more about our plans for the REEF Campus, visit the Interpretive Center webpage. There are a limited number of other sponsored landscape features along the new Native Plants Trail, including interpretive signs, benches, and picnic tables. Please contact us directly at giving@REEF.org or 305-852-0030 if you are interested in these opportunities.

From all of us at REEF, thank you to all of our donors! Our work would not be possible without your support. Please have a safe and fun-filled 4th of July!

Passion for the Cause: REEF's Legacy Society

Rosette Davila is leaving her legacy for the oceans through a life estate gift to REEF.

Rosette Davila cares deeply about the health of the oceans. As a supporter of REEF programs both in the water and on land, Rosette wants to make a difference. That's why she recently became part of REEF's Legacy Society through a life estate gift. When asked why she chose REEF, Rosette described a long history of diving (since 1993), where she has become increasingly alarmed with the deterioration of our oceans. In 2015 Rosette joined REEF's Lad Akins and Peter Hughes on a REEF Invasive Lionfish Research Trip to The Bahamas. Her experience removing lionfish, during that trip and subsequently in the Turks and Caicos, opened her eyes to how beneficial REEF's citizen science programs can be. Rosette is determined to do whatever it takes to help REEF in their efforts, as she has seen firsthand the positive results of the work REEF does.

Rosette recently retired from her family's pharmacy in Texas and has relocated to Spain. As she was settling her affairs, she contacted REEF to request a letter of intent indicating her wishes. We are so grateful for Rosette and the other members of REEF's Legacy Society.

Are you interested in becoming a part of REEF's Legacy Society? Contact Bonnie Barnes at bonnie@REEF.org for more information.

Stocking Stuffer

REEF_postcard_l.jpg
REEF Postcard for Sale

The holidays will be upon us before you know it and REEF is encouraging you to go on line to the REEF Store and purchase your holiday stocking stuffers like our beautiful note cards, wonderful books and DVD's.  We still have plenty of Sensational Seas DVD's available as well.  We recently updated the store with a large number of exclusive items that you can only get from REEF, so please check it out and put us on your shopping list as REEF funnels all proceeds to help fund our various programs. 

We would also like to give our warm thanks to Eleanor Cavanaugh who is the artist behind our wonderful collection.  

To buy apparel at our store, click here

To visit our store for your diving materials, click here... 

Design by Joanne Kidd, development by Ben Weintraub