Double Your Donation and Make a Difference For Marine Conservation

Photo by Jonathan Lavan.

Earlier this month, for World Oceans Day, the Curtis and Edith Munson Foundation celebrated by pledging to match contributions to REEF dollar for dollar, up to $30,000! Our campaign to raise funds for protecting Nassau Grouper, controlling invasive Lionfish, and inspiring citizen science through the Volunteer Fish Survey Project is off to a great start. But we still need your help to reach our goal in the next 30 days. If you haven't yet had a chance, please contribute today. You can double your donation in the upcoming month by contributing online through our secure web form. Or you can print the donation form and mail or fax your donation, or call our staff at REEF headquarters (305-852-0030).

Contributions from members like you fuel the success of our programs. With your donation, we can expand our new online "Fishinars," which are growing rapidly in popularity. We can continue to fund lionfish education and outreach efforts, such as the Lionfish Cookbook, training and handling workshops, and derbies. Our staff can also keep working with Cayman Islands officials after the recent victory that extended the ban on fishing in Nassau Grouper spawning aggregations. These are just some highlights of REEF accomplishments that are funded by individual contributions. With a chance to double your donation, no gift is too small!

Putting It To Work: New Publications on Lionfish

Photo by Carol Cox.

REEF Director of Special Projects, Lad Akins, has co-authored several recent scientific publications on the invasive lionfish in the western Atlantic, including:

-Diet richness of invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish revealed by DNA barcoding. Marine Ecology Progress Series. Significant research by REEF researchers and others has been conducted looking at stomach contents of lionfish to identify prey. However, relatively few prey species have been identified because of the challenge of identifying partly digested prey. The authors of this study addressed this issue by DNA-barcoding unidentifiable fish items from the stomachs of 130 lionfish. They identified 37 prey species, half of which had previously not been recorded as lionfish prey.

-Rapid invasion of Indo-Pacific lionfishes (Pterois volitans and Pterois miles) in the Florida Keys, USA: evidence from multiple pre- and post-invasion data sets. Bulletin of Marine Science. This paper uses data from the 20,000+ REEF surveys conducted in Florida since the early 1990s, along with other long-term data sources, to document the appearance and rapid spread of lionfishes in the Florida Keys. Between 2009 and 2011, lionfish frequency of occurrence, abundance, and biomass increased rapidly, increasing three- to six-fold between 2010 and 2011 alone.

- Habitat complexity and fish size affect the detection of Indo-Pacific lionfish on invaded coral reefs. Coral Reefs. This paper explores detectability rates of lionfish using underwater visual census methods such as belt transects and stationary visual census. Knowing the error in these methods specficially for lionfish is necessary to help study this invasive species in the western Atlantic. The authors found that the two census methods detect fewer than 30% of lionfish present in an area and, in more than 50% of the cases, fail to detect any lionfish when one or more indivudals are actually present.

For a complete list of publications featuring REEF data, visit www.REEF.org/db/publications.

REEF Joins in Submersible Expedition to Assess the Lionfish Invasion Beyond Diving Depths

REEF Affiliate Scientist, Dr. Stephanie Green inside the Antipodes sub.
Several dozen invasive lionfish call an artificial reef in South florida, the Bill Boyd, home off.

REEF's Director of Special Projects, Lad Akins, and REEF affiliate scientist Dr. Stephanie Green (Oregon State University) and REEF Advisory Panel member Dr. Steve Gittings (NOAA National Marine Sanctuaries) participated in the first submersible expedition to assess the lionfish invasion on deep marine habitats off South Florida June 27-29. While REEF and other scientists have studied lionfish in shallow habitats, the Antipodes lionfish expedition gave scientists the opportunity to learn about lionfish populations far below recreational diving limits. The five person submersible is capable of descending to 300 m (1,000 ft) deep and has large acrylic domes that allow for observations and photography.

During the expedition, team members including Dr. Gittings and Dr. Green completed dives to 300ft in the submersible to look for lionfish on both natural rocky and artificial reefs, including the 209ft-long cargo ship Bill Boyd. Both scientists sighted dozens of invasive lionfish in all habitat types during the dive, highlighted by view of the stern of the wreck holding dozens of lionfish. Dr. Green also conducted a number of REEF surveys to document the native fish community in areas invaded by lionfish, sighting a number of reef fishes that are often only found below recreational dive limits, including snowy grouper, roughtongue bass, red barbier, short bigeye, and bank butterflyfish.

The project, hosted by NOVA Southeastern University, was led by OceanGate Inc. and included participants from Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, University of Miami, NOVA, and Guy Harvey Foundation, and others. On Saturday following the expedition dives, Lad Akins, Dr. Green, and Dr. Gittings met with media and the public in a half-day summit to discuss the invasion and potential actions to manage lionfish populations in areas that can't regularly be accessed by divers. The summit concluded with a lionfish filleting demonstration by Lad, and a tasting of lionfish ceviche prepared by Kareem Anguin, Executive Chef, The Oceanaire Seafood Room. See the expedition website for more information.

As part of a Florida Sea Grant funded project, REEF is working this summer to assess deepwater lionfish populations in the Florida Keys using ROVs and technical divers.

Please Support REEF and Our Important Marine Conservation Work

Be a part of our new Giving Reef! Donate $500 or more during our winter fundraising campaign.

We want to extend a special thanks to our members who have already made a donation during our Winter Fundraising Campaign. If you haven't yet, please take a moment to support REEF's critical marine conservation work. You can contribute securely online at www.REEF.org/contribute or call REEF Headquarters at 305-852-0030.

With your support, we will build on twenty years of success. In 2014, REEF plans to: 

  • Encourage use of REEF data to provide species and habitat protections, like those afforded this year to Giant Pacific Octopus in Washington State, Hogfish, Goliath Grouper, and Yellowtail Snapper populations
  • Promote the new fish and invertebrate monitoring program in the South Atlantic States
  • Expand the Volunteer Fish Survey Project to Australia, the Coral Triangle, the North East Atlantic, and the Mediterranean
  • Continue the Nassau Grouper educational program and analyze data collected this year from recently deployed underwater microphones
  • Lead the charge in addressing the lionfish invasion in the Caribbean and Atlantic

Give a gift to our oceans by supporting REEF programs. This year, we also have gifts to give in appreciation of your donation, which include a print of a limited edition, signed print of Sailfin Blenny ($250 or more), acknowledgement on the Giving REEF ($500 or more), and a special webinar with Ned and Anna DeLoach ($1,000 or more).

Great Annual Fish Count is Coming

The 22nd annual Great Annual Fish Count (GAFC) is rapidly approaching! Will you be participating? We encourage local shops, dive clubs, and other groups to organize an activity anytime during the month of July (and often training events in June). You can view events already scheduled, and add your own, by visiting www.fishcount.org.

The concept behind the GAFC is to not only accumulate large numbers of surveys during the month of July, but to introduce divers and snorkelers to Fishwatching and conducting REEF surveys. Interested groups can offer free fish ID classes, organize dive/snorkel days, and turn them into fun gatherings! To find out more, contact us at gafc@reef.org.

The Faces of REEF: 2014 Volunteer of the Year, Dawn Vigo

Dawn Vigo, REEF's 2014 Volunteer of the Year
Dawn underwater. Photo by Janna Nichols.

REEF is delighted to announce our 2014 Volunteer of the Year, Dawn Vigo. As an enthusiastic member for the past 12 years, she has done over 75 fish surveys on Field Survey trips, and is a Level 3 surveyor in the TWA region. In addition, she’s participated in and helped with many other facets of REEF’s programs and outreach efforts.

Dawn has gone to great lengths to help at many dive shows including the DEMA show in Las Vegas and is a big factor in REEF’s success at Our World Underwater show in Dawn’s hometown of Chicago. She enthusiastically explains about REEF’s programs to show-goers and has a never-ending supply of energy.

If you are a regular attendee of our online webinars (Fishinars) within the past two years, you’ll recognize Dawn as a regular behind-the-scenes staff person helping with technical details or answering your questions.

Dawn has also helped administer Experience Level tests to others, furthering the success of REEF’s Volunteer Fish Survey Project. We are lucky and thankful to have a super volunteer who contributes to REEF in so many ways. Thank you, Dawn!

California Fishinars

Opalescent Nudibranch is one of the species monitored by REEF divers in California, and one that will be covered in the upcoming series. Photo by Elaine Jobin.

Are you a California diver? Or perhaps simply an ocean enthusiast wanting to learn more about critters that call the California kelp forests home? Then be sure to check out the upcoming Fishinar schedule. Whether you've attended one of our famous Fishinars (REEF's version of an online webinar) before or not, you're sure to enjoy one of our upcoming free classes! From the comfort of your own home, or on-the-go on your mobile device, you can join in the camaraderie of your fellow fish-fanatics and learn from experts in our short, free, fun and interactive-styled Fishinars. Check out www.REEF.org/fishinars for more information. 

Upcoming California Fishinars include:

  • Invertebrates and Algae of REEF's California Survey Project - This four class series (September 8, 10, 14, 16) will cover all 63 of the invertebrates and algae included in REEF's California survey program.
  • Islands in the Stream: Fish of the California Channel Islands - October 20

A few other Caribbean Fishinars are scheduled this Fall as well, including:

  • The Nightstalkers! Eels of the Caribbean - September 30
  • The Ones You Should Know: Top 25 Fishes of the Caribbean - November 16

The Faces of REEF: Lad Akins Awarded DEMA's Reaching Out Award

Lad teaching a lionfish handling workshop.

We are excited to announce that Lad Akins, REEF Director of Special Projects, is a 2016 recipient of Diving Equipment & Marketing Association (DEMA)’s Reaching Out Award! First presented in 1989, this award honors leaders in the diving community whose significant contributions to the sport have elevated the industry on all levels. Lad will join distinguished past recipients including Jacques Cousteau, Dr. Sylvia Earle and Dr. Eugenie Clark, as well as REEF Co-Founder Paul Humann, and Board of Trustees Members Peter Hughes and Marty Snyderman.

Lad has worked tirelessly since REEF’s founding in 1990 to educate divers around the world about the marine environment and how to actively engage in conservation efforts through citizen science. Due to Lad’s efforts and dedication over the past 26 years, REEF is one of the largest citizen science organizations in the world with more than 60,000 members and over 200,000 fish surveys submitted to REEF’s online marine sightings database.

Lad spearheaded REEF’s efforts to combat the lionfish invasion over a decade ago. Lad has worked with scientists, government officials, the dive industry and the public to spread awareness and to facilitate the management and effective removal of these prolific invaders. His contributions to this issue have been numerous, widespread, and inventive. He pioneered the concept of lionfish derbies, and has authored or co-authored 30 scientific publications, as well as other publications, including “Invasive Lionfish: A Guide to Control and Management” and “The Lionfish Cookbook: The Caribbean’s New Delicacy”, now in its second edition.

Without Lad, REEF would not be where it is today. We are happy that he is receiving the recognition for his work to conserve our oceans and his impacts on countless divers and citizen scientists.

Congratulations, Lad!

The Faces of REEF: Laurie Fulton

Laurie with one of the dive masters from our Philippines Field Survey in 2016.
Laurie surveying in Tubbataha Reef. Photo by Ron Lucas.
Showing off her 600th dive while on the Fiji Field Survey in 2015.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Laurie Fulton. Laurie lives in Colorado, and has been a REEF member since 2012. She is an Advanced Surveyor (Level 3) in four of REEF's regions. She participated in the REEF Expedition to the Azores last summer as part of REEF's expansion to the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. To date, Laurie has completed 197 surveys. Here’s what Laurie had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF?

My first REEF trip was in 2012 to the Sea of Cortez on the Rocio del Mar. I had done volunteer trips with other non-profit groups, and was looking to combine my love of diving with volunteer work. REEF provides the perfect combination of both passions.

If you have been on a REEF Field Survey, where and what was your trip highlight?

Since 2012 I have been hooked on REEF trips and try to do a few each year. Every trip is filled with remarkable experiences, and I consider every new fish added to my life list as a highlight. That being said, it’s hard to beat the extraordinary experience of having whale sharks swim by in the Philippines!

What is your favorite part about being a REEF member?

I really enjoy expanding my knowledge and appreciation of the undersea world combined with the opportunity to dive with like-minded people and contribute to research data. I compare it to birdwatching. In addition to observing, identifying and counting, we get to add our data to a vast online database that is available to researchers around the world. It is citizen science at its best!

Where is your favorite place to dive?

Living in Colorado I don’t get to do much local diving, so I love having the great variety of REEF trips available to me. One of my favorite destinations has been Fiji for the calm warm waters and huge diversity of fish to count!

What is the most fascinating fish encounter you’ve experienced?

A stand out for me was in Hawaii watching a Peacock Grouper coax a Whitemouth Moray out of its hole for a session of cooperative hunting. The grouper kept rubbing up against the eels head until the moray plunged down into jumbled coral and rocks while 5 groupers raced along above it. Just like using a dog to hunt.

What is your favorite fish or invertebrate?

One of my favorite marine creatures has to be the octopus. I have had many encounters with these intelligent animals over the years and am always thrilled to see them on dives. Just watch Hank on ‘Finding Dory’!

Do you have any surveying, fishwatching, or identification tips for REEF members?

Before each REEF trip I spend time watching the Fishinars for the region. I also take the survey paper and mark the page number from the book for each species next to it. That way I look at each fish and become familiar with the layout of the survey paper.

What is your most memorable fish find and why? What fish do you really want to see underwater?

Last year in the Bahamas I found a Golden Hamlet, which is pictured on the cover of the Humann and DeLoach book. It is my only sighting after years of diving in the Caribbean, so it was very exciting. It was not a REEF trip so no one on the boat quite got it. I would love to swim with a Mola Mola, it’s just such an odd fish.

The Faces of REEF: 2016 Volunteer of the Year, Janet Eyre

Janet Eyre, REEF's 2016 Volunteer of the Year.
Janet receiving her award from Christy Semmens.
Janet with two fellow fish nerds, Doug Harder (l) and Kreg Martin (r).

REEF is proud to announce Janet Eyre as our 2016 Volunteer for the Year. Janet has been a REEF member since 2002, and she is one of REEF’s most active surveyors. She is a Golden Hamlet member and to date has conducted 1,612 surveys (and counting!).

Janet spent her early years with REEF climbing the ranks of surveying in the Tropical Western Atlantic and Hawaii. In recent years, she has been instrumental in REEF’s expansion efforts to the tropical Pacific, including the South Pacific and Central Indo-Pacific regions. She is a Level 5 Expert Surveyor in all four of those regions. She has also conducted surveys in our Tropical Eastern Pacific region, and Janet participated in our REEF Expedition to the Azores Islands last summer to assist with our expansion to the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. She has participated in 18 REEF Trips and several Advanced Assessment Team projects.

Janet’s expertise in tropical Pacific fish taxonomy rivals any academically-trained scientist. She has documented over 2,000 fish species in her REEF surveys, and 1,478 of those species have been in the tropical Pacific regions. She holds the record for the most fish seen on one REEF survey: 260 species in 73 minutes at the dive site “Edy's Black Forest” near Waigeo in Indonesia.

Janet volunteers countless hours helping REEF staff create new survey and training materials, and she assists with the error checking and quality control of topical Pacific surveys. She is looking forward to working with our staff on developing the next region for the Volunteer Fish Survey Project, the Indian Ocean and Red Sea.

Janet loves to find new-to-her species, which, after all the surveys in the different regions of the world, is getting harder and harder. She gets particular satisfaction finding undescribed species. In 2015 her quest for getting a fish named after her finally became a reality when she found an unidentified goby in Fiji. It was later described as Eviota eyreae, Eyre's Dwarfgoby.

Janet spends about 100 days a year diving (or traveling to dive). When she is home, she splits her time between San Francisco and Nantucket. We are so grateful for Janet’s enthusiasm and dedication to REEF and our mission. Janet - thank you and congratulations!

Design by Joanne Kidd, development by Ben Weintraub