The Faces of REEF: Joe Gaydos

Joe surveying in the Pacific Northwest. Photo by Pete Naylor.
The elusive and charismatic Pacific spiny lumpsucker is at the top of the wish list for all Pacific Northwest fish watchers (including Joe!). It is a member of the snailfish family and has modified pelvic fins that act as suckers. Photo by Keith Clements.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Joe Gaydos, Ph.D., an avid REEF volunteer in Washington State and Director of the SeaDoc Society (a REEF Field Station). Joe has been a REEF member since 2003 and has conducted 120 surveys. He is a member of the PAC Advanced Assessment Team, and Joe was instrumental in initiating the AAT San Juan Islands Annual REEF Monitoring Project that kicked off this summer (see story in this enews issue). Here's what Joe had to say about REEF:

How are you involved as a REEF member?

I conducted my first REEF survey in Washington State in 2003, and have been doing them ever since. In addition, the program I run, the SeaDoc Society, is a REEF Field Station. We’ve hosted numerous fish and invertebrate identification classes and multiple Great Annual Fish Count dives, but I’m most excited about our new monitoring program collaboration. We’ve partnered with REEF to have Advanced Assessment Team Divers come to the San Juan Islands for annual week-long survey trips. We expect that over the next 8-10 years these data will help us understand long-term sub-tidal changes in the ecosystem.

What inspires you to complete REEF surveys? What is the most interesting thing you’ve learned doing a REEF fish survey?

I live and dive in the Salish Sea, a 17,000 square kilometer inland sea shared by Washington and British Columbia. The data collected by REEF volunteers are valuable to the managers in the region who are working to recovery declining species like Northern Abalone and Rockfish. I love being able to collect data that is meaningful.

In your opinion, what is the most important aspect of REEF’s projects and programs?

As a scientist, I love that the REEF data are collected in a way that is scientifically rigorous. Volunteers are trained and their level reflects their training and experience. Also, it is great that the data are collected and stored in a way that they will always be available for evaluation – even decades from now. This is citizen-science at its finest.

Where is your favorite place to dive?

My favorite place to dive is about 2 miles from my house. It’s a high current area split by an island so you get the benefits of seeing all of the invertebrates that flourish in the current, but you can always dive on one side of the island or the other. The site is familiar, but strikingly beautiful and I always find something new. The water is cold here and people generally expect everything to be dull and they are amazed to see videos or stills of colorful invertebrates and fishes.

Is there a fish (or marine invertebrate) you haven’t seen yet diving, but would like to?

Here, most everybody wants to see a Giant Pacific Octopus – 150 lbs, 2,240 suckers (unless it’s a male, then they only have 2,060) – what’s not to love. But me, I still want to see a Pacific Spiny Lumpsucker. They’re only the size of a golf ball, but dang are they cute. When is Disney going to make a movie starring one of them?! Maybe this year.

New Invertebrate and Algae Survey Program for the Northeast!

American Lobster is one of 60 invertebrate and algae species now monitored by REEF surveyors in the Northeast US and Canada. Photo by Amy Maurer.

REEF is excited to announce that we have added a new invertebrate and algae survey program to the Northeast region (Virginia - Newfoundland). Similar to our other temperate regions, REEF surveyors in this area can now record all fishes as well as a select group of 60 invertebrate and algae species. Species included in the program were selected in consultation with regional scientists and experts to serve as a representative sample of the biodiversity of the region. Consideration was given to species that are habitat indicators, are harvested, and those that are just fun to look at (like nudibranchs!). REEF Outreach Coordinator, Janna Nichols, launched the new program at the Boston Sea Rovers meeting last month. As part of the new program, we have created a new underwater survey paper that includes the invertebrates and algae, as well as a waterproof color ID card. New training curricula are currently being developed for Northeast Fishes and Northeast Invertebrates and Algae. All of the new materials can be found on the REEF online store. A big thanks to all who helped shaped this program, provided guidance, and donated images for the new materials.

The Faces of REEF: Daryl Duda

Daryl underwater. Photo by Steve Simonsen.
A smiling porcupinefish. Photo by Daryl Duda.
Scrawled Cowfish eating a jellyfish. Photo by Daryl Duda.
One fish that can scare a shark - the Goliath Grouper. Photo by Daryl Duda.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Daryl Duda. Daryl has been a REEF member since 2012, and has conducted 43 surveys. He is working his way up the ranks, and is now a Level 3 Surveyor! Here's what Daryl had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF or become a REEF member?

I first learned about REEF during a stay in Key Largo while spending the day with the Coral Restoration Foundation. Later, I met Keri Kenning (past REEF intern and staff) at "Our World Underwater" scuba show in Chicago and she invited me to the little yellow house on my next visit to Key Largo. Its been over 2 years and I've been a member since.

What are some of your favorite moments as a REEF surveyor?

During REEF's 20th anniversary REEF Fest event last summer, I did my first survey dives, and it happened to be with Paul Human, Ned and Anna DeLoach, and Jonathan Lavan. After a morning full of interesting seminars, the afternoon diving with this all-star REEF cast made for an incredibly fun filled day. Since those first surveys, I find it difficult to be underwater and not identify and count fish. I feel like all my previous diving was just being underwater looking around. As the Sherpa said to Sir Edmund Hiliary as they scaled the mountain, "Some come to look, but others come 'To See'". I see things I have never seen before now that I started doing field surveys.

Do you have a favorite REEF Field Station?

There are many terrific dive shops in Key Largo. My favorite is Rainbow Reef Dive Center. They put a guide in the water with every 6 or so divers at no extra charge. This way I can concentrate on my photography and fish identification. Their crew is extremely knowledgeable about underwater life and curious about everything we see. Captain Alecia Adamson (another past REEF intern and staff) has become my fish ID mentor. Whenever I get stumped by a fish, I email her a photo and she helps me out.

Do you have a memorable fish encounter?

Diving on Molasses Reef in Key Largo one day, we swam around a ledge to see a 6 foot reef shark cozy up to a goliath grouper. The grouper let out a loud bellow that frightened the shark away. I never saw such a large fish swim so fast. Also, at Elbow Reef off Key Largo I got some good shots of a scrawled cowfish chomping on a jellyfish. It was the cutest thing to watch.

What is your favorite fish?

My favorite fish is the Porcupinefish. I can usually get reasonably close to get a good photo. They always look like they are smiling at you. I also like Honeycomb Cowfish that can change colors right before your eyes.

Any fishwatching tips to share?

I started of very slowly identifying fish because I didn't know very many. I always carry my camera on a dive and Ned DeLoach suggested using my point and shoot to help with my fish ID. Later back home I can zoom in and do a more accurate ID using my library of reference books. If I can't figure it out, I can email the photo to someone at REEF or post on the ID Forum at REEF.org.

REEF Ocean Explorers Summer Camp

We are very excited to introduce REEF’s Ocean Explorers Camp: a summer day camp designed for the ocean-minded and adventurous! REEF Ocean Explorers Camp immerses campers in an ocean of learning and fun! Based at John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park in Key Largo, Florida, REEF will introduce campers to the underwater world and all the amazing things found beneath the sea. Each camp session includes:

  • Snorkel trips to the first underwater state park in the US
  • Kayak ventures into winding mangrove trails
  • Stand up paddle board excursions over seagrass beds
  • Glass bottom boat rides offering a view from the surface
  • Marine science lessons, experiments, and crafts
  • Opportunity to connect with nature and make new friends

Join REEF’s Ocean Explorers Camp to make a splash this summer. We welcome campers ages 8 – 14. Sibling discount available. A $275 camp tuition includes park entry fees, activity expenses, equipment rentals, and souvenir REEF gear including a T-shirt and water bottle! Camp sessions are offered June 15-19, July 13-17, and August 10-14. For more information please visit www.REEF.org/Explorers/Camp or call (305) 852-0030.

GivingTuesday - a Global Day of Giving

#GivingTuesday is coming up! Are you ready to pledge your support for REEF's vital marine science and education programs? On December 1, watch your inbox for an important message from our co-founder, Paul Humann, describing how REEF is taking action to address our changing seas.

GivingTuesday is a global day dedicated to giving back. On Tuesday, December 1, 2015, charities, families, businesses, community centers, and students around the world will come together for one common purpose: to celebrate generosity and to give. We hope you will include REEF in your GivingTuesday giving plans.

The Faces of REEF: Mary Korte

Mary surveying in Kauai.
Mary and Don snorkeling and surveying!
Mary getting ready.
A rare dry moment for Mary.
Butterflyfish, often found in pairs, like Mary and Don! Photo by Carol Cox.
It's always great to have a buddy to point stuff out to.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Mary Korte. Mary, and her husband Don, have been REEF members since 2001. Both are active surveyors, and Mary is a Level 3 surveyor in the TWA who has completed 284 surveys (all on snorkel!). Here’s what Mary had to say about REEF:

What is your favorite part about being a REEF member?

Everything! I especially love the Fishinars because they are a great way to improve my fish identification skills, and they boost my confidence in my ability to record species accurately. Fishinars also inspire me to read about the species and learn more about the fish behaviors I observe. I’d love to dive, but I can’t SCUBA dive due to my cardiac history. However, even as a snorkeler, I can contribute to the REEF database. I used to feel bad that I couldn’t dive, but REEF staff members have been wonderful and have told me that reporting data from the top 10-15 feet is important—I’m thankful for their encouragement. I also love that the REEF staff will help me identify “mystery fish” in photos I take while surveying.

If you have been on a REEF Field Survey, where and what was your trip highlight?

My husband and I went on the first lionfish survey REEF organized in Curacao. Curacao is a special place for us because we’ve spent our wedding anniversary there every year for almost 15 years. It’s a wonderful island, and the fish life is amazing. It meant a lot to be able to help gather data on the lionfish invasion and hopefully make a difference in the future of the reef fish populations. Without a doubt, eating those pesky fish was the highlight. As our t-shirts say, “Wanted Dead and Grilled: Lionfish, Pirate of the Caribbean.” They make very tasty ceviche, too! We also loved the wonderful sunset sail the last night.

If you had to explain REEF to a friend in a couple of sentences, what would you tell them?

You’ve probably known birdwatchers who keep a life list of bird species they’ve seen. They may collect data, e.g. by participating in the Great Backyard Bird Count. REEF volunteers are “fishwatchers” who keep a life list of fish and collect data on fish abundance and biodiversity for a global database used by marine biologists to monitor the health of coral reefs worldwide. Over 60 scientific papers have been written using REEF data which is really amazing.

In your opinion, what is the most important aspect of REEF’s projects and programs?

I think the most important aspect is that REEF’s professional staff and volunteer “citizen scientists” are enhancing our understanding of coral reef ecosystems and fish populations. REEF’s database is an invaluable resource for marine scientists, and it is a privilege to help gather information that is useful for their work. I believe humans have a unique responsibility to care for the environment and our fellow creatures. Hopefully we can collectively make a difference in preserving these special living organisms and places for future generations.

What is your favorite fish?

My favorite fish are the butterflyfish because we almost always find them swimming in pairs. My husband and I have been married 46 years and we always snorkel together so the butterflyfish remind me of all the wonderful years we’ve had together. Surveying for REEF is one of the things we most enjoy doing as a couple because we are both biology teachers and love the ocean.

Where is your favorite place to dive and why?

We’ve lived in Wisconsin for the last 20 years, but I really love being near the sea. I’ve completed most of my surveys in the tropical Western Atlantic although I’ve also surveyed in Hawaii and the Galapagos. This summer I’ll be in French Polynesia for a week, and I’m looking forward to adding new fish to my life list. We were there almost 30 years ago, and that is where my husband and I fell in love with snorkeling although we didn’t know about REEF back then. It’s really hard to pick one favorite place, but I especially like the British Virgin Islands, the Bahamas, and Curacao because of the species diversity and beautiful water. Curacao probably tops my list because there are so many great places that are easily accessible from shore, and Playa Lagun is probably my favorite place to spend an afternoon there because I almost always see eels and interesting fish.

Do you have any surveying, fishwatching, or identification tips for REEF members?

Slow down and take time to enjoy really watching the fish—don’t be in a hurry to move on to a new spot too quickly. Linger in one place and try to figure out what the fish are doing. It’s not just about identifying and counting fish—it’s also about relaxing and savoring the privilege to be in this environment. If you slow down, you’ll use more of your senses, notice more details, and begin to feel that you are a part of the ecosystem even if only briefly as a guest. Absorb the tranquility and drift with the fish—breathe slowly, feel the water, and go with the flow. Always, always carry a camera because you never know what you’ll find.

Putting It To Work: Who's Using REEF Data, September 2016

REEF population data on Goliath Grouper are currently being used by several different researchers and government agencies to help support the recovery of this threatened species. Photo by Lureen Ferretti.

Every month, scientists, government agencies, and other groups request raw data from REEF’s Fish Survey Project database. Here is a sampling of who has asked for REEF data recently and what they are using it for:

- Data on three large Caribbean parrotfish species were provided to a scientist at California State San Luis Obispo to evaluate status and trends in these declining species.

- Data to evaluate population densities of herbivores in Bahamas and Belize were provided to researchers from Georgia State University.

- Goliath Grouper data were provided to researchers from University of Florida to build a spatial model to look at grouper management options and to the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council to develop a Population Learning Model.

- Data on sea stars and sea urchins from the Pacific Northwest were provided to a researcher working with the Coastal Ocean Research Institute to report on the health of Howe Sound in British Columbia.

Field Methodology Course This Summer

REEF's Summer Field Course is a great way to get experience out on the water.

This summer, REEF will host our second Reef Fish Field Methodology Course in Key Largo, Florida. This one week hands-on course is designed for college undergraduates and recent graduates aspiring towards a career in marine biology or a related field. The course covers commonly used tools and techniques for visual assessments of reef fishes. Through classroom and field experiences, the course will expose students to Tropical Western Atlantic fish identification, size estimations underwater, surveying reef fishes using transect, roving and stationary visual techniques, benthic assessments, and management of survey data.

Prospective participants must be at least 18 years of age, enrolled in or a recent graduate of a college level program, and hold a scuba certification. To get more details on REEF’s Fish Field Methodology Course and to apply visit www.REEF.org/fieldcourse or contact Amy Lee at (305) 588-5869 or trips@REEF.org .

Visit the REEF Store For Your Holiday Shopping!

Have you checked out REEF's online store recently? It's the perfect place to get gifts for the ocean lovers in your life. In addition to a great selection of marine life books and REEF survey supplies and gear, we have a ton a fun gift items -- Holiday Ornaments, Preservation Creature Puzzles, Hammerhead Bottle Openers, Swell Style Bags from Bungalow360, and Conservation Creature Plushes! Visit www.REEF.org/store to see all of our great inventory.

The Faces of REEF: Fred and Laura Hartner

REEF members Fred and Laura Hartner.
Laura on a dive in the Philippines.
Fred looking for some small species in Bonaire.
Fred and Laura enjoying a sunset.

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. More than 65,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Fred and Laura Hartner, REEF members since 1995. Together they have conducted more than 440 surveys throughout the Tropical Western Atlantic, Hawaiian Islands, Central Indo-Pacific, and South Pacific regions. Originally from New Jersey, the Hartners now reside in Florida, where they are active surveyors and volunteer for many REEF events, such as lionfish derbies. Here's what Fred and Laura had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF or become a REEF member? How did you first hear about REEF? We first heard about REEF through our local New Jersey dive shop. Shortly thereafter, we visited the REEF booth at the Beneath The Sea dive show in Secaucus, NJ. After talking to Director of Special Projects, Lad Akins, we became members. We did a few surveys on our own before volunteering as surveyors on our first REEF Field Survey Trip to the Big Island in Hawaii.

If you have been on a REEF Field Survey Trip, where and what was your trip highlight? We have been on numerous REEF Field Survey Trips to the Tropical Western Atlantic (TWA) region, including Key Largo, Belize, Little Cayman, St. Vincent, Roatan, and San Salvador. We also caught, filleted, and ate (the best part) lionfish on two Curacao trips. We also joined the REEF Trip to the Philippines. What a lot of new fish to learn! It was so much fun that we quickly booked the REEF Trip to the Solomon Islands after that. If you love to dive and enjoy watching fish, each trip is special for the variety of fish and reef profiles. A night dive in Kona, Hawaii, to see the mantas and observe the eels hunting in the light, the tiny octopus who mimicked other creatures in the grassy areas of St. Vincent, the experience of reducing the lionfish population in Curacao, and the enormous whale sharks of the Philippines are some to the memories that come to mind. One of the best benefits of a REEF Trip is networking with and learning from other fish geeks who share the same interest and excitement as you do.

What inspires you to complete REEF surveys? What is the most interesting thing you’ve learned doing a REEF fish survey? Surveys are a valuable source of data for ocean researchers and a way for us to contribute to the ecological well-being of the reef systems we so cherish. Surveying also makes one stop and appreciate the fish, their habitat, and their behavior. It’s a satisfying activity to record your own life list.

Do you dive close to where you live, and if so, what is the best part about diving there? Where is your favorite place to dive and why? We realized we enjoy diving and counting fish so much that we moved from New Jersey (too cold) to Key Largo and aim to be underwater at least once a week all year. However, our favorite place to dive is wherever we happen to be diving that day.

What is your favorite fish? Laura’s favorite fish is the Whitespotted Filefish because of its swimming behavior and ability to change its coloration. Fred’s favorite fish is the one he hasn’t seen before.

Design by Joanne Kidd, development by Ben Weintraub