Upcoming Fishinars - Drums, Rare Cozumel Finds, and Scientific Illustration!

Juvenile Cubuyu, one of several drum species found in the Caribbean that will be covered in the upcoming Fishinar on Drums. Photo by Carol Cox.

Have you joined a Fishinar yet? These popular online REEF webinar training sessions provide fishie fun in the comfort of your own home. Fishinars are free, and open to all REEF members. You need to register for each session you want to attend. No special software is required, just a web browser. Upcoming sessions include:

Lesser Known Fish of Cozumel - October 17

Feel the Beat! The Top 12 Drums & Croakers of the Caribbean - October 29

You do WHAT for a living? Illustrating Fishes - with special guest Val Kells, Scientific Illustrator - November 13

New Fishinars are always being added. Check out the Webinar Training page (www.REEF.org/fishinars) for the most up-to-date listing and to register for each session.

Putting It To Work: Who's Using REEF Data, March 2014

Spiny Pink Sea Star in the Pacific Northwest. Photo by Janna Nichols.

Every month, scientists, government agencies, and other groups request raw data from REEF’s Fish Survey Project database. Here is a sampling of who has asked for REEF data recently and what they are using it for:

- Researchers from Western Washington University, Simon Frasier University, and the SeaDoc Society are all using REEF data to evaluate the status of echinoderms in the Pacific Northwest and how the rapid spread of seastar wasting disease will affect populations.

- Scientists from Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife are including REEF data in an evaluation of the status of Northern Abalone in Washington State.

- A researcher from RSMAS at University of Miami is using REEF data from throughout the Caribbean basin to evaluate populations of predators.

Upcoming Fishinars - Sand Dwellers, Life on Oil Platforms, Sharkinar, and more!

Don't miss the Sharkinar on October 22nd. Sand Tiger Shark photo by Jeffrey Haines.

We've got lots of exciting, fun, and educational REEF Fishinars in store for you this fall - featuring your favorite instructors and special guests. Check out the full schedule at www.REEF.org/fishinars. REEF Fishinars are a free benefit of REEF membership, and did you know that REEF members can also access and view any of our archived Fishinars from previous years? Fishinars coming up include:

  • Playing in the Sandbox: Top 12 Sand Dwellers of the Caribbean - Jonathan Lavan, October 7th
  • Sharkinar! - Dr. Dean Grubbs, Florida State University, October 22nd
  • That Face, That Face, That Wonderful Face! Top 12 Blennies of the Caribbean - Jonathan Lavan, November 4th
  • What I Did on My Fall Vacation - Research on the Fishes of Southern California Oil and Gas Platforms - Dr. Milton Love, UC Santa Barbara, November 10th
  • Lionfish Myth Busters, Liz Underwood, December 3rd

Explore our Fishinar webpage, register for the sessions you like, and we'll see you online! No special software or is required - just a computer with speakers and an internet connection. And did we mention they are FREE to REEF members!

Fishinars in 2015 - Check Out the Full Schedule!

You asked for it! A "Turtlinar" is scheduled forJune 18. Hawksbill Turtle photo by Paddy Ryan.

We now have a full schedule of Fishinars planned for 2015. Topics ranging from fishes of Laguna Beach, common invertebrates of New England, Puffers and Porcupines of the Caribbean, and thanks to many requests, we even have a "Turtlinar" for you! If you haven't participated in one of our free, educational webinars yet, you don't know what you are missing! Known as Fishinars, these hour-long sessions enable you to learn and have fun from the comfort of your living room. Check out the full schedule and links to register at www.REEF.org/fishinars. Planned Fishinars for 2015 include:

  • May 18, 20, Common Fishes of Catalina Island, Parts 1 and 2, Taught by Janna Nicols
  • May 21, Snap on! Snap off! The Snapper, Taught by Jonathan Lavan
  • June 9, Dude, Let's Go Diving - Fishes of Laguna Beach Shore Dives, Taught by Jonathan Lavan
  • June 18, "Turtlinar" - Sea turtles around the world: are they in trouble?, Taught by Dr. Selina Heppell
  • June 24, Lesser Seen Fishes of Turks and Caicos, Taught by Jonathan Lavan
  • July 8, Rock On! California Rockfishes and Scorpionfish, Taught by Jonathan Lavan
  • July 14, Invertebrates of New England, Taught by Janna Nichols
  • July 16, Fishes of New England, Taught by Janna Nichols
  • July 21, Puffers and Porcupines of the Caribbean, Taught by Carlos and Allison
  • July 23, Pacific Coast Young of the Year (YOY) Rockfish ID, Taught by Janna Nichols
  • July 28, Fishes of Bonaire Shore Diving, Taught by Dr. Christy Pattengill-Semmens
  • September 1, Those Darn Damsels - Reboot, Taught by Jonathan Lavan
  • Sept 8, 10, 14, 16, Invertebrates and Algae of REEF's California Survey Project, Taught by Jonathan Lavan
  • September 30, Night Stalkers - Eels of the Caribbean, Taught by Jonathan Lavan
  • October 20, Islands in the Stream - Fishes of the California Channel Islands, Taught by Jonathan Lavan
  • November 16, The Ones You Should Know - Top 25 Fishes of the Caribbean, Taught by Jonathan Lavan

Home Grown REEF Clubs! FIN and Pacific Northwest Critter Watchers

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FIN members gathered at Maluaka Beach in July for a Great Annual Fish Count dive.
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FIN members, Liz Foote and Josh Wittmer (who is also a previous REEF Marine Conservation Intern and now works for the Pacific Whale Foundation on Maui), getting ready for a FIN-organized REEF dive at Honolua Bay earlier this month.

We say it often - REEF is what it is because of our fantastic members.  The grassroots nature of the organization is reflected in all aspects of our work, including the amazing volunteers like Audrey Smith who help with daily operating tasks at REEF HQ, the networks of regional REEF partners who enlist new REEF members and provide continuing education and survey opportunities for active surveyors, our members who generously support REEF with financial donations, and of course the thousands of survey volunteers who submit marine life surveys each year. 

As the corps of active and experienced REEF surveyors has grown, we have been fortunate to have some of those members take their support and interest in REEF to the next level by forming local REEF groups.  Two such REEF "clubs" are FIN (the Fish Identification Network)  and the Pacific Northwest Critter Watchers.  FIN is a REEF club based in Maui, and is touted as an opportunity to join friends and fellow fish lovers in exploring the coral reefs of Maui.  The club is for all interested divers and snorklers, and promotes marine conservation and the objectives of REEF.  FIN was founded by Terri and Mike Fausnaugh (Mike is also a member of the REEF Hawaii Advanced Assessment Team (AAT)) and is supported by the cadre of REEFers that REEF partner, Liz Foote of Project S.E.A.-Link, has generated in Hawaii through the years.  There are monthly (sometimes weekly) FIN dives at various beaches on Maui and at every event FIN folks set up a REEF station on the beach with survey materials and identification reference guides in an attempt to lure in new afishianados!  The PNW Critter Watchers encourages all divers in Washington and Oregon to become underwater naturalists.  Through training and quarterly REEF survey dives, Critter Watcher founders and REEF Pacific AAT members, Janna Nichols and Wes Nicholson, aim to put the fun in critter watching and promote REEF surveying in the Pacific Northwest.  Janna also maintains a Critter Watchers website that includes a fish of the month feature, an events listing, unusual sightings reported by fellow Critter Watchers, and congratulations to REEF surveyors who have advanced through the REEF experience level system.

These home-grown REEF clubs are a great way to help spread the fun and enjoyment of REEF surveying to a local dive community.  We are grateful that we have such enthusiastic and supportive volunteers who are willing to help spread the REEF word.  These on-the-ground activities could never be accomplished without your help!

REEF Members Visit HQ

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Here the Carters are seen with their preferred products from the REEF store. Sharol is holding her new favorite thing, the REEF home study course. Mark is holding an old favorite, the DVD Sensational Seas- he told us he thinks everyone should own a copy.
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The little yellow conch house which is REEF HQ was built in 1913.

REEF members, Mike and Sharol Carter of California, stopped by headquarters this month during their visit to The Keys. They enjoyed a few great dives and were looking forward to a kayak tour before heading back home.

It's not uncommon for REEF members to travel far and wide for fish-watching and surveying. Sharol ordered the Reef Fish Identification Beginning Course - Florida, Caribbean, Bahamas DVD home study course prior to their travels. She said she was thrilled to recognize local Keys fish and happy for memory tips on the DVD, like the button on the mutton fish which made her fish-watching much more fun.

Thanks to Mike and Sharol for brightening our day with their smiles. We hope to see them again soon, if not here then perhaps on a field survey in the future.

REEF headquarters is located in Key Largo, FL at mile marker 98.3. We are the little yellow conch house in the median. According to local historian Jerry Wilkinson, the building we are in was built in 1913. We're told, it is the oldest standing building in the Upper Keys still in the same location.

If you happen to be visiting The Florida Keys, please don't hesitate to stop in and say hello.

Don't Miss NBC Nightly News Story About REEF Lionfish Research

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Lad Akins and Andy Dehart capture a lionfish during a recent REEF Lionfish Research Project.

A segment featuring REEF's research on the invasion of the Indo-Pacific Lionfish into the western Atlantic and Caribbean was featured on NBC Nightly News June 30th. Click here to view the segment online. NBC worked closely with REEF, NOAA, USGS, the National Aquarium in Washington DC and our other partners to produce the story. The close partnerships that REEF has formed to address the situation are yielding great results, but we are more concerned than ever about the spread of this invasion and the impacts it may have.

For The Love of the Sea Benefit - Save The Date

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A pair of courting peppermint basslet. Photo by Ned DeLoach.

Join us on Saturday, February 7, for the second annual For the Love of the Sea Benefit and Auction in Key Largo, Florida, at Amoray Dive Resort. This ocean-themed event will include sunset cocktails, dinner, dancing under the stars to a steel drum band, an auction and presentations by REEF founders and famed underwater photographers, Paul Humann and Ned DeLoach. The evening festivities aim to raise awareness about REEF, our amazing volunteers and the critical marine conservation work that our programs support. A silent and live auction will offer prizes from local businesses and exotic dive travel. Tickets are $85 each. There is a limited number of tickets for purchase this year so don't delay. Click here to purchase tickets online. To buy tickets over the phone, as well as to find out about becoming an event sponsor or to donate an item to the auction, contact Janet Bartnicki at 305-852-0030 or fortheloveofthesea@reef.org. We hope to see you there!

Students Learn About Science From REEF Programs

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Students from the U-32 High School spend a week in Bermuda conducting REEF surveys.
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A U-32 student conducting a REEF survey in Bermuda.
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Clark Magnet High School students conferring about fish sightings in the Channel Islands.
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A map of kelp bass density around Anacapa Island, generated by Clark Magnet High School using REEF data.

The Volunteer Survey Project is at the center of REEF's citizen science programs. It provides thousands of divers and snorkelers the opportunity to contribute information on the status and biodiversity of ocean populations. The Survey Project also serves as a training opportunity in many formal and informal education programs. In this issue of REEF-in-Brief, we feature high school students on both sides of the US who are learning first hand how to conduct fish surveys and analyze their results.

The U-32 High School in Montpelier, Vermont, offers a Marine and Fresh Water Biology Class to Seniors each year. Their instructor, Brian Slopey, is also a REEF surveyor. The course focuses on the comparison between rivers, lakes and the ocean. Students examine the living components of these ecosystems as well as the influence of physical and chemical conditions. The students conduct extensive marine research during a trip to the Bermuda Institute of Oceanic Sciences, including conducting snorkel REEF fish surveys. During each field project, approximately 100 surveys are conducted. In preparation for the trip, students use the Reef Fish Identification Beginning ID Course DVD to learn groups of fish. They then generate Geographic Summary reports for Bermuda from the REEF database and use the Fish ID Interactive DVD software to more closely research species of fish they will likely observe. Once in Bermuda, the students keep an extensive journal that includes fish and invertebrate behavior observations, plankton tow observations, lecture notes and notes on readings.

On the other side of the country, in La Crescenta, California, students at Clark Magnet High School, have been working to collect and analyze marine life survey data from the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (CINMS). With this project, which is currently funded by a Toyota Tapestry Grant, students use geographic information science (GIS) to document effects of marine protected areas on species abundance. Using species lists from the REEF database, students create field reference notebooks on the fish, invertebrates and algal species inhabiting the CINMS. In preparation for field surveys, students practice with the REEF online fish identification quiz. The students then work with dive teams from NOAA, Ventura County Sheriff’s divers and Sport Chalet to conduct REEF surveys for the class and to document the study areas and project procedures with underwater photography. Following the field work, students analyze the data and display the results of their projects as maps and graphs in scientifically formatted poster presentations. Each student poster incorporated an extended abstract that the students submit for publication in The New Journal of Student Research Abstracts.

Are you using REEF programs in a formal or informal education program? Email us at data@reef.org and let us know about it!

Trips For Your Lifelist

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The strange-looking shortnose batfish is one of the critters you might find in Dominica. Photo by Ned DeLoach.
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Topside discoveries like this flamingo colony in Bonaire (and amazing waterfalls in Dominica) can be found on both these trips. Photo by Kai Kane.

Want to add a few new species to your life list? Look no further than Dominica and Bonaire. These islands both offer some unique treasures and are sure to please every level of diver as well as beauty above water for your non-diving companions. REEF is leading Field Surveys to both of these beautiful islands this year, and we invite you to join us! The Dominica field survey trip is April 17 - 24, and Bonaire takes place September 25 – October 2.

The natural beauty of Dominica includes some of the most enchanting topography both above and below the waterline, with several waterfalls and hiking trails to be explored on one of the least developed islands in the Caribbean. The diving is also spectacular, and on our last trip here seven years ago flying gurnards, short-nose batfish, fringed filefish, blackfin snapper, harlequin pipefish and reef scorpionfish were all documented by our keen-eyed surveyors. REEF Board member Heather George is leading the trip this year, and she will help you look for these species and many more.

Few dive sites in the world can provide 100 fish species on a single dive - Bonaire is one of these special places. During our survey week here, you are likely to add at least 5 or more new species to your life list, no matter what your current REEF level. Trip Leader, Jessie Armacost, lived in Bonaire and taught Fish ID there for 7 years. She will help you find clingfish, pikeblennies, maculated flounders, medusa blennies, semi-scaled gobies and many other fish that are rarely found elsewhere. During group sessions you will learn where to look for viper morays, ringed blennies as well as popular fish like spotted drums and seahorses. The diving is easy with great accessible shore dives as well as easy close-by boat dives, and the trip will be particularly exciting this year during the annual coral spawn, when the reef is charged with sexual energy day and night.

Join us on one of these exciting weeks full of fish ID, friendship, new discoveries and great memories! Our full field survey schedule, trip details, and sign up information can be found here.

Design by Joanne Kidd, development by Ben Weintraub