Great Diving On One of the Friendliest Islands in the Caribbean

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Lucky REEF members who joined Board Member Heather George for a week in Dominica.
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The cryptic Reef Scorpionfish was a good find on the Dominica Field Survey. Photo by Jonathan Lavan.

Last week, we kicked off the 2010 REEF Field Survey season with a spectacular trip to Dominica. Eight REEF members (and two non-diving spouses) headed out for 5 days of excellent dives with many wonderful discoveries along the way. Highlights included a glut of Secretary Blennies, Arrow Blennies and Lofty Triplefins along with Cherubfish, Longlure Frogfish, Longsnout Seahorses, Shortnose Batfish, a Reef Scorpionfish (see picture), most of the Hamlets and a Black Brotula found by yours truly and witnessed by James Brooke and trip leader Heather George. Another thrilling highlight was watching a pair of Barred Hamlets spawning during our dusk dive - the final dive of the trip. Congratulations go out to our new level 3 surveyors, Amy Kramer and Chris Ostrom, and a new level 2 surveyor, Kirsten Ostrom. Both topside and below, the crew at Dive Dominica was very enthusiastic. Not only were they very interested in REEF’s mission and pointing out the best fish and creatures, but also helped us coordinate daily travel and restaurant jaunts. Roseau, Dominica’s capital, has that small town feel, very friendly and accommodating to us, and everyone knows each other. On our “off-gas’ day, many of us explored the inner island, climbing up to Trafalgar Falls where three freshwater fish were discovered; a freshwater Grunt, Goby and Suckerfish. We also ventured up the beautiful Titou Gorge. Dominica is a truly beautiful island with fantastic views, great diving and some of the friendliest people in the Caribbean - an island not to be missed.

REEF Field Surveys are week-long dive trips coordinated by REEF and led by experienced staff, Board members, and instructors. These "Trips that Count" are a great introduction to fish identification for novice fishwatchers, and a fun way for experienced surveyors to build their life list while interacting with fellow fishwatchers. Check out the 2010 schedule here and reserve your space today!

Marine Conservation Internship Program Is Back

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Fall 2010 REEF Interns, Nicole and Stephanie, after a survey dive.
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Summer 2010 Intern, Zach, demonstrates a lionfish dissection at REEF HQ.

REEF is excited to announce the revival of the Marine Conservation Internship Program at REEF Headquarters in Key Largo, Florida. The internship program was an important part of REEF's early history, with many past interns going on to have great careers in the field. Some have even spent time as REEF staff. The program was temporarily suspended a few years ago due to a lack of infrastructure. Thankfully, we have been able to bring the program back, providing significant benefits to both REEF and those who complete the program. Alecia Adamson, REEF Field Operations and Outreach Coordinator (and past REEF intern herself!), is in charge of overseeing the internship program and is pleased that REEF is once again able to offer the opportunity to college students and recent graduates.

Over the summer, Zachary Bamman, from University of Central Florida, assisted REEF with both the Great Annual Fish Count and lionfish reporting, research, and control. He was a great help during a very busy time for REEF. Zachary is now finishing a degree in Environmental Sciences and was able to obtain credit hours for an independent research project he conducted examining invertebrate vs. fish prey items in Florida Keys lionfish. REEF is pleased to welcome new interns Nicole Fabian and Stephanie Dreaver for the Fall semester. Both arrived to REEF Headquarters in September. Nicole graduated with a B.S. in Zoology-Marine Biology from Michigan State University in May. She went diving for the first time in 2000 on a trip to Grand Cayman and has since been hooked. Although she grew up in Michigan most of her diving has been in the Caribbean and has since received her Master Diver certification. She plans to pursue graduate level education in Marine Biology in the next coming year. Stephanie Dreaver graduated this past August from West Virginia University with a degree in Biology and she is very interested in the Marine Biology field. She has had an interest in diving and snorkeling ever since a family vacation to Hawaii 8 years ago. Her family relocated to Key Largo the next year and she has become familiar with Florida marine systems through firsthand experience. She obtained her open water certification 5 years ago and she has now reached Rescue Diver certification. She plans to continue her education next fall and pursue a Masters in Marine Biology.

If you or someone you know is interested in applying to be a future REEF Intern, visit the application page -- http://www.reef.org/about/internships/application.

Another Milestone - 20,000 Survey Mark Surpassed in Pacific Coast Region

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Long-time REEF member, Mike Delaney, conducted the 20,000 survey in the Pacific Coast region.

Following on the heels of our milestone in Hawaii in January of reaching 10,000 surveys, the REEF Survey Project saw its 20,000th survey submitted from the Pacific Coast Region. Divers from California to the Pacific Northwest have been conducting surveys on fish, invertebrates, and algae since 1997. Over 1,300 sites have been surveyed and 1,554 volunteers have participated. Mike Delaney conducted the lucky 20k survey at Whitecliff Park in British Columbia on February 4th, 2011! Congratulations Mike! It was particularly exciting that this landmark survey was conducted at Whitecliff because not only is this the 407th REEF survey conducted in this important little marine park but it is also where the very FIRST surveys were ever conducted in the Pacific Northwest.

Support Marine Conservation and Your Donation Will Be Doubled

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During our Summer Fundraising Campaign, we reach out to you, our valued members, and ask for your financial support. Your contribution will ensure that our important marine conservation work can continue. Donations made during the campaign will be matched dollar for dollar by the Curtis and Edith Munson Foundation, doubling the impact of your support. You can donate securely online at www.REEF.org/contribute, mail your donation to REEF at PO Box 246, Key Largo, FL 33037, or call us at 305-852-0030. REEF is making a difference in the marine environment. We strive to stay on the cutting edge of science, education, and outreach initiatives, but we cannot do this without your support. Thank you to everyone who has already donated. Please help us meet our goal of raising $60,000 in 60 days.

The Faces of REEF: Member Spotlight, Patricia Richardson

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Commerson's Frogfish, one of Pat's great finds at Richardson Marine Park. Photo by Patricia Richardson.
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Pat helping the next generation of REEF surveyor!
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REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 43,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we feature Patricia Richardson (REEF member since 2000). Pat lives on the Big Island in Hawaii, and is a member of REEF's Hawaii Advanced Assessment Tea. Pat has conducted 778 surveys, and most of these have been done at one site. She has really enjoyed getting to know every critter that lives in her neighborhood spot. Here's what Pat had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF or become a REEF member?

Richardson Ocean Park in Hilo, Hawaii, is near my home – and by chance shares my name. In 2000, I decided I wanted to learn as much as I could about the fish life in this popular beach area with the purpose of keeping a record of species diversity and general ocean health. Not long after I began my project, Liz Foote and Donna Brown came to Hilo to conduct a REEF training session. The REEF survey methods were a perfect match with my personal project! Before I left the training session, I was signed up, tested for Level 2, and hooked! I submitted my first survey dated January, 2001.

If you have been on a REEF Field Survey, where and what was your trip highlight?

Since then I have become SCUBA certified and have participated in four REEF survey trips in Hawaii led by Christy and Brice Semmens. My favorite was the trip to Kauai in August of 2006. I saw my first pair of Tinker’s Butterflyfish, also a Hawaiian Morwong and a Whiskered Boarfish. The last two fish are more common in the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands than in our main islands. We were also thrilled to see Hawaiian monk seals on several dives. Another REEF adventure was a trip to American Samoa in 2010 to help REEF extend survey methods into the South Pacific. This was my first chance to do surveys out of my home waters. It was very exciting to see many new species along with familiar “faces” from Hawaii.

What inspires you to complete REEF surveys?

Keeping a close watch on the fish life at Richardson Ocean Park is still my favorite activity. I use mask, snorkel, and fins because the average depth of the area I survey is 4 to 6 feet, with occasional drops to 20 feet if the surf is down. A single survey usually takes about 2.5 hours. After ten years and about 700 surveys in this one small area, I am still amazed each time I enter the water with the constant change and constant beauty I find there. From time to time, something new pops up to keep me alert. Recently it was a Yellowhead (Banded) Moray. And a couple times it was a Hawaiian Monk Seal! Unfortunately, there’s no place on the data sheet for that! I also drive to Kona on the west side of Hawaii Island to dive and snorkel, always with my underwater survey slate in hand.

What is your favorite part about being a REEF member?

My connection with REEF gives me the satisfaction of being a “citizen scientist” and a good excuse to spend several hours each week following beautiful fish around and watching their fascinating behavior. After a decade as a REEF fish counter, I am looking forward to the next decade. It’s the greatest retirement project I can imagine!

Want to learn a few of the Hawaiian fishes that Pat loves so well? Join the upcoming Fishinar, March 21st:

Fish that Say Aloha! Hawaii's Top 15

Hawaiian REEF Fish ID: Learn tips from REEF Experts and fish geeks, Donna Brown and Liz Foote.
Essential for dive travelers heading to the Hawaiian Islands, and kama'aina alike.
Wednesday, March 21st at 4pm HST / 7pm PDT / 10pm EDT - Register

Top of the Charts: Survey Stats, July 2012

A big fish thanks to our recent active surveyors. Since the beginning of the year, 458 volunteers have conducted REEF surveys. A total of 4,353 surveys were conducted and submitted during this time (January - July 2012)!

To date, 162,059 surveys have been conducted by REEF volunteers.

REEF members who have conducted the most surveys in the last seven months (with survey number shown):

Tropical Western Atlantic (TWA) - Dee Scarr (140), Franklin Neal (126), Michael Phelan (118), Dave Grenda (115), Isobel Flake (76), Douglas Harder (66)

Pacific Coast US & Canada (PAC) - Randall Tyle (109), Phil Green (59), Keith Rootsaert (54), Georgia Arrow (41), M. Kathleen Fenner (40), Doug Miller (37)

Hawaiian Islands (HAW) - Judith Tarpley (118), Don Judy (87), Patricia Richardson (65), MJ Farr (63), Rick Long (39), Kathleen Malasky (32)

Tropical Eastern Pacific (TEP) - Jonathan Lavan (21), Pam Wade (20), Dave Grenda (15), Mary Korte (4), Daphne Guerrero (2), Kim Amiot (1)

South Pacific (SOP) - Carole Wiedmeyer (4), MJ Farr (4), Alex Garland (2), Kreg Martin (34), Lillian Kenney (27), Barbara Anderson (25)**the last 3 surveyors in the SOP list are stats from 2011 

Visit www.REEF.org/db/stats to see the Top 25 surveyors with the most surveys conducted to date, the most species-rich locations, and most frequently sighted fish species.

REEF Fest - Save the Date - August 7-11, 2013

In the summer of 1993, the first REEF fish surveys were conducted by a group of pioneering volunteers. Twenty years later, REEF's Volunteer Survey Project and other REEF initiatives are leading the way as innovative and effective marine conservation programs. To celebrate, we will be hosting 4 days of diving, learning, and parties this August in Key Largo, Florida, and we hope you will join us! REEF Fest - Celebrating 20 Years of Marine Conservation Success will take place August 7-11, 2013. The weekend will include diving oportunities each day, as well as seminar offerings such as Intro and Advanced Fish ID, Lionfish Collection, Artificial Reefs in the Keys, Grouper Moon, and special talks given by REEF Co-Founders, Paul Humann and Ned DeLoach. We'll also have an open house at REEF HQ and a celebration banquet on Saturday night. More details will be coming soon, including the complete schedule, seminar registration, hotel room blocks with special rates, diving charters, and social gatherings. But in the mean time, please save the date and get ready to celebrate!

Lionfish Workshop Roadshow – Coming to a City Near You!

REEF's Keri Kenning leads a lionfish workshop.
Attendees of the lionfish workshop in Miami, Florida.

As part of our efforts to address the lionfish invasion to the western Atlantic, REEF received a grant from the US Fish and Wildlife Service Aquatic Invasive Species Program to organize and lead lionfish workshops throughout the Southeast United States. Between August and October, REEF staff Keri Kenning and Lad Akins will be traveling to more than a dozen coastal communities to present information on the lionfish invasion and hands-on demonstrations on collecting and handling. Workshop topics include background of the invasion, lionfish biology, ecological impacts, current research findings, collecting tools and techniques, market development, and ways to get involved.

So far, nearly 400 people have attended workshops at Houston Zoo and the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary Headquarters (TX), North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher and North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores (NC), South Carolina Aquarium (SC), and University of North Florida and University of Miami (FL).

The next workshop will be on Monday, October 21 in Cape Canaveral, FL. More workshops will be coming to Alabama, the Florida panhandle, Central and South Florida. The classes are free of charge and open to the public. All divers, fishers, and ocean enthusiasts are encouraged to attend. Check www.REEF.org/lionfish/workshops as new workshops are added. Hope to see you there!

The Faces of REEF: Susan Hieter

REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 50,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Susan Hieter. Susan has been a REEF member since 2001, and has conducted 38 surveys. She recently moved to Aruba and is enjoying getting back in the water as a REEF surveyor. Here's what Susan had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF or become a REEF member? How did you first hear about REEF?

I became a member 12 years ago when I designed a marine biology/oceanography class for my high school in Kutztown, Pennsylvania. We decided to become members of various marine organizations and donate money that we did fund raisers for. I did my first REEF volunteer survey at the Flower Garden National Marine Sanctuary in the Gulf of Mexico in 2006 through a teacher program called Down Under, Out Yonder (DUOY).

What do you enjoy most about doing REEF surveys?

I really enjoy visiting the same reefs to see what new fish have arrived. It also leads me to think about why some fish are there sometimes and other times not due to various stressors. The most interesting thing I have learned from doing REEF fish surveys is seeing the abundance of fish on the island of Aruba, where I am currently working and living.

Do you have a favorite local REEF field station or dive shop?

My favorite REEF field station is JADS Dive Center in Aruba. The dive staff is very friendly and will make sure you enjoy your dives. The shop is well equipped with rental gear that is in good working condition. They will go out of their way to help you.

What is your favorite fish?

I would have to say the Goliath Grouper (somewhat small compared to the ones in Florida) that I meet on the Jane Sea wreck in Aruba was the most fascinating fish encounter because it was not afraid of me and was about to give me a kiss but on second thought, maybe it was going to take a bite out of me.

Advanced Assessment Team (AAT) Wrap-Up for July

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Upper Keys AAT: Mike Smith, Brian Hufford, Joe Cavanaugh, Marissa Nuttall, Lillian Kenney, Wayne Manning, and Brenda Hitt
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Middle Keys AAT: Brian Hufford, Joe Cavanaugh, Marissa Nuttall, Paige Switzer, Wayne Manning, Brenda Hitt, and Ann Outlaw
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Joe Cavanaugh, Brian Hufford, Dave Grenda, Erin Whitaker, Mike Phelan, and Brenda Hitt

REEF completed two Advanced Assessment Team (AAT) projects this past month, the Wellwood Monitoring Project and the Spiegel Grove Monitoring Project.  Many of you may not know about REEF's AAT program, please check this link to learn more about this very important REEF program.  Essentially, as REEF members gain more experience identifying fish and conducting surveys, they can move through our experience level testing and hopefully achieve expert status, after which time these members are invited to participate in special monitoring and assessment projects with REEF staff.  To learn more about our experience level testing, please click here.

Both the Wellwood and Spiegel projects were 5-year AAT assessments.  The M/V Wellwood, a 122-meter Cypriot-registered freighter, ran aground on August 4, 1984, on Molasses Reef off Key Largo, Florida. The ship impacted the reef's upper fore reef and remained aground for 12 days. The grounding destroyed 1,285 square meters of living corals and injured 644 square meters of coral reef framework.  In an effort to restore habitat structure and stability to the grounding site, restoration began in May 2002. REEF was contracted by the National Marine Sanctuary Program to document recruitment of fishes onto the site as well as the subsequent changes, if any, to surrounding reefs sites. Our final assessment was completed on July 29th.

The final Spiegel Grove AAT was completed on August 8th. The Spiegel Grove is a 510' LSD that was intentionally sunk as an artificial reef structure in the waters between Molasses Reef and Elbow Reef in Key Largo, Florida, in May 2002.  Previous to the May 16, 2006 sinking of the Oriskany (aircraft carrier), the Spiegel Grove was the largest ship ever intentionally scuttled to create an artificial reef.  Pursuant to the permit received by the Upper Keys Artificial Reef Foundation (UKARF) to sink the ship in National Marine Sanctuary waters, a plan for pre-deployment and periodic monitoring was implemented.  The UKARF contracted REEF to conduct pre-deployment and periodic monitoring of the Spiegel Grove and adjacent natural and artificial reef sites.  Monitoring documented fish presence/absence and relative abundance at 8 sites during 7 monitoring events in Year 1 and then bi-annually thereafter for four years. Thank you to all the AAT members, who over the past 5 years contributed to either of these survey efforts.

I also want to send out a BIG thank you to everyone who helped out on our AAT projects the past few weeks.  In addition to the Wellwood and Spiegel projects above, we completed our annual middle and upper Keys Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary assessments - 12 days straight!  Specifically, I would like to thank Horizon, Paradise, and Quiescence Divers dive shops, and the following individuals, a couple of whom did all 12 days of AAT project diving- Dave Grenda, Brenda Hitt, Brian Hufford, Lillian Kenney, Wayne Manning, Ann Outlaw, Mike Phelan, and our two past interns (newest AAT members) - Marissa Nuttall and Paige Switzer.

Our next AAT project will be the Biscayne National Park AAT in early October (team already assembled).  Also, the Hoyt Vandenberg will present an exciting and new AAT project for REEF beginning next year.  Currently the ship is being prepared for sinking in Norfolk, VA.  It's due to be brought down to the Keys in January (08) and deployed in early April, about 6 miles off the coast of Key West http://www.fla-keys.com/news/news.cfm?sid=1854 .  We are currently finalizing our monitoring plan for this vessel and will be monitoring this newest artificial reef over the next 5 years, beginning in early spring with a pre-deployment event.  You will hear more about this project in the coming months.

Hope to see you in the water soon.

Best "fishes,"

Joe

Design by Joanne Kidd, development by Ben Weintraub