The Faces of REEF: Member Spotlight, Jonathan Lavan

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Secretary Blenny. Photo by Jonathan Lavan.
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REEF members are at the heart of our grassroots marine conservation programs. Over 43,000 divers, snorkelers, students, and armchair naturalists stand behind our mission.

This month we highlight Jonathan Lavan (REEF member since 2004). Jonathan has conducted 195 REEF surveys in four REEF regions, and he is a member of the Advanced Assessment Team in the Tropical Western Atlantic. Here's what Jonathan had to say about REEF:

When and how did you first volunteer with REEF or become a REEF member? How did you first hear about REEF?

I got certified at age twenty in the cold waters of Maine. I dove there and in Florida for a number of years but then, like so many of us, life got in the way for several years. When I got back into diving I quickly realized that I really knew very little about what I was looking at. I started buying some ID books and eventually stumbled upon the Caribbean Fish ID Guide by Humann and DeLoach. Sometime after that I found the REEF website and saw that REEF had trips. My wife and I signed up for the Bahamas trip in ’04 with Paul Humann and after that I was hooked. I usually go on a couple REEF trips a year and any other trip I go on I always do REEF surveys whenever possible.

If you have been on a REEF Field Survey, where and what was your trip highlight?

Last April I went to Dominica with trip leader Heather George. On one dive I got a little separated from the group (as usual) as I was taking photos. I found a small cave and managed to hunker down to get a good look inside despite all my gear. Tucked way back in the cave I saw something quite small undulating like a piece of ribbon in the wind. It was a Black Brotula! Well I started shaking my rattle like crazy to try and get someone’s attention. Finally, Heather and another diver came over and after much gesturing and changing of places they both, finally saw it. I must say there was nothing more satisfying then when Heather looked around that last corner way back in the cave, saw the elusive fish and then I heard her say clearly through her regulator: “OOOooohh!”

What is your favorite fish or marine invertebrate?

I have many favorites but I have to say that I never get tired of watching or taking pictures of Secretary Blennies. They are so easy to personify with all their goofy expressions and fussy behavior.

Do you have any surveying, fishwatching, or identification tips for REEF members?

As a photographer and surveyor, the key (as many know) is to go as slowly as possible. Let the divemaster race on ahead or make it very clear to them that you are going to be going “SLOOOW”. Not looking under that last ledge could be the difference between a great dive and really great dive.

Design by Joanne Kidd, development by Ben Weintraub