REEF-in-Brief January 2010

Introduction

Happy New Year! We hope that all of our members had a joyous holiday season. This edition of REEF-in-Brief brings you program updates, plus profiles on some of our valued members including REEF's 2009 Volunteer of the Year, David Jennings.

We would also like to remind you that there are many opportunities in 2010 to take a trip that counts with REEF. Be sure to check out the schedule. Many of the trips are filling up fast so reserve your spot today, and join us in Dominica, Baja Mexico, Roatan, or any of the other exciting destinations that we'll be visiting.

And finally, we would like to thank all of you who have donated to REEF during our Winter fundraising campaign. If you haven't donated yet, please consider sending your gift today. Donate securely online today, or mail your donation to REEF!

 

Support REEF During Our Fundraising Campaign

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Members who donate $250 or more during our 2009 Winter campaign will receive this limited edition, signed print.

Our 2009 Fall/Winter fundraising campaign has been a huge success! Despite these challenging economic times, loyal REEF members have donated over $59,000, just $3,000 less than the Winter 2008 campaign total. If you haven’t already donated, please consider donating today to help us exceed last year’s total. It’s not too late to get this limited edition, signed print of a beautiful South Pacific reef. There are only a few left! Click here to securely donate online (https://www.reef.org/contribute) or mail your donation to REEF HQ, PO Box 246, Key Largo, FL 33037!

We are excited to kick off 2010 by continuing and expanding our core programs:

  • REEF will continue a Lionfish project in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands aimed at increasing awareness, conducting hands-on training and determining effectiveness of removal strategies;
  • Scientists will be in the field in Little Cayman next month for the Grouper Moon Project research, studying one of the last large spawning aggregations of endangered Nassau grouper; and,
  • REEF will expand our central citizen science program, the Fish Survey Project, to the South Pacific, with a launch event planned in American Samoa at the Fagatele Bay National Marine Sanctuary.
  • Thank you again for your dedication and support of REEF conservation programs.

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    REEF 2009 Volunteer of the Year

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    David Jennings is REEF's 2009 Volunteer of the Year. Photo by Janna Nichols.
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    David conducting a survey along the Olympic Coast. Photo by Janna Nichols.
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    Never without his slate! Photo by Janna Nichols.

    REEF proudly awards our 2009 Volunteer of the Year award to David Jennings, a dedicated REEF surveyor and ambassador. David has been a member of REEF since 2006. He has conducted 154 REEF surveys and he is a member of the Pacific Advanced Assessment Team (AAT).

    David is a textbook example of the phrase “Learn it, Love it, Protect it”. After participating on REEF’s annual AAT survey project of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary in 2008, David became concerned that the rockfish populations he was documenting had significantly decreased from those that the REEF teams documented in the earlier years of the project. Rockfish are especially vulnerable to over-fishing because they are long-lived species, some living to be over 100 years old! After looking at the REEF data for the region as well as the existing rules for rockfish harvest, David put together a series of proposed rule changes and submitted them to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) for consideration.

    What makes David special is he then took the extra step of getting involved directly. In June 2009, David was appointed by the Washington Governor to a six-year term as one of Washington’s nine Fish and Wildlife Commissioners—another volunteer conservation position.

    David is also just about as active above water, working on forest conservation work. He helped establish a grassroots forest conservation organization, the Gifford Pinchot Task Force (GPTF) and serves as volunteer chair of that organization.

    Picking just one outstanding volunteer each year is difficult. REEF volunteers are the cornerstone of the organization. Without this dedicated corps, our marine conservation programs would not exist. They are central to the REEF Volunteer Survey Project, in which over 12,000 divers and snorkelers have submitted their sightings information to the largest marine life database in the world. REEF volunteers conduct important marine conservation research alongside scientists as part of the Grouper Moon Project and the Lionfish Invasion Program. And donations from our members are critical to ensuring the long-term success of the organization.

    The REEF staff and Board of Trustees extend a big thank you to David and congratulate him on all of his efforts and great work on behalf of the organization and marine conservation.

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    Grouper Spawning Aggregation Research Continues in 2010

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    The Grouper Moon Project studies the spawning aggregations of the endangered Nassau grouper. Photo by Selina Heppell.
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    Over 3,000 Nassau grouper aggregate at a site off Little Cayman Island during winter full moons. Photo by Scott Heppell.

    Scientists and project volunteers from REEF and our partner institutions, the Cayman Islands Department of the Environment and Oregon State University, are getting ready for another year of the Grouper Moon Project. The team will be in the field for two weeks beginning on the full moon, January 30. Since 2001, REEF has led the Grouper Moon Project, a multi-faceted, collaborative research effort in the Cayman Islands aimed at better understanding Nassau grouper reproduction and the role that marine reserves can play in the long-term protection of this endangered species.

    In 2003 the Cayman Island Marine Conservation Board instituted an 8-year fishing ban on Nassau grouper at all historically known aggregation sites in the Cayman Islands. This followed the discovery by fisherman of 7,000 aggregating Nassau grouper on the west end of Little Cayman in 2001 and the subsequent harvest of 4,000 of those fish over two spawning seasons. At the time, all other known Nassau grouper aggregations in the Cayman Islands had become inactive due to over-harvest. Thanks to a three-year grant awarded in 2008 by the Lenfest Ocean Program of the Pew Charitable Trusts, REEF is conducting research through the Grouper Moon Project to evaluate the current status of the Cayman Islands spawning aggregations and the effect of these harvest protections -- “The reproductive biology of remnant Nassau grouper stocks: implications for Cayman Islands Marine Protected Area (MPA) management”.

    The broad goals for the 2010 spawning season are to continue monitoring recovery in the large spawning aggregation on Little Cayman, and to expand research into the fate of remnant spawning aggregations on Cayman Brac and Grand Cayman. Watch future issues of REEF-in-Brief for field season results and what's next for the protection of spawning aggregations in the Cayman Islands as the current harvest ban is due to expire. To find out more about the Grouper Moon Project, visit the webpage http://www.reef.org/programs/grouper_moon

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    2009 Keys Community Award Presented at REEF Holiday Open House

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    John Pelletier, Sr., was on hand to accept the REEF Keys Community Volunteer Award in memory of his son Chip Pelletier.
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    Nancy Perez, Ned DeLoach, Jane Bixby, John Pelletier, Sr., and Anna DeLoach.

    REEF relies on the contributions of its volunteers and donors, whether it is taking a survey, helping pay the bills or participating in a conservation project - everything we do makes a difference. John “Chip” Pelletier, a volunteer at REEF Headquarters made a difference. Every week, Chip quietly showed up at the Lockwood REEF Headquarters and worked for hours, mowing, weeding, clearing and keeping the grounds. Chip passed away in October and is truly missed by our community. In December during REEF’s Holiday Open House, on Chip’s behalf, his father John Pelletier, Sr., accepted the 2009 REEF Keys Community Volunteer Award. The award is given to a member of the Keys community in appreciation for extraordinary service to REEF.

    In addition to honoring Chip, the Holiday Open House was a fun evening that brought together REEF volunteers and supporters in the Key Largo community. Anna and Ned DeLoach hosted the event and spent the evening chatting with everyone, signing books, and raffling items. There was plenty of laughter and holiday spirit. A big thanks to Nancy Perez and Diana Philips for making sure that the food was plentiful and Headquarters looked festive.

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    Active REEF Surveyor in San Diego Honored by SD Oceans Foundation

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    REEF Pacific Advanced Assessment Team member, Bob Hillis. Photo courtesy SDOF.

    The San Diego Oceans Foundation (SDOF) is one of REEF's valued partner organizations. SDOF has been supporting its volunteers to participate in REEF surveying for the last several years and has sponsored dozens of survey training workshops. SDOF recently honored REEF member, Bob Hillis, who is a long-time SDOF Reef Monitoring Volunteer, as their 2009 top volunteer for his invaluable support of the oceans. Having completed 202 REEF Surveys, Bob has continued to strengthen his connection to the sea while providing indispensable information about the status of marine populations off the coast of California. 
Bob joined REEF in 2006 and is a member of the REEF Pacific Advanced Assessment Team (AAT). In addition to being an active surveyor, he and his wife helped spread the REEF word last year at our SCUBA Show 2009 booth.

    Bob says - “I started doing surveys when I saw a notice for an SDOF Fish ID class on the Divebums website. I had started fish watching a few years before when I reached the "been there, done that" point of diving in San Diego. I started diving here in the early '70's and did all the abalone, lobster, blue water spearfishing, divemaster, instructor, dive medtech and public safety diver things. I live in the mountains (about 60 miles from the coast), but the ocean is my favorite playground! I am also an avid surfer, body surfer and ocean swimmer. Doing REEF surveys with SDOF gives me an opportunity to enjoy my passions and give a little back to the ocean as well. These surveys actually force me to focus on and identify all of the species that I used to see (but not REALLY see). Always hoping to locate a new or rare species has added a new and exciting dimension to diving.”

    Thanks for your efforts, Bob, and congratulations! And thanks to SDOF for their continued support of the REEF program.

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    REEF and Partners Publish Nonindigenous Marine Fish Field Guide

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    Working in close partnership, REEF, NOAA, and the USGS, have just completed the first field guide to non-native fishes in Florida. The 120 page publication documents the occurrences, identification and ecology of more than 35 non-native fish species found in Florida waters. Detailed sightings maps, notes on similar appearing species and information on native ranges are included. The goal of the publication is to provide a single source, field ready guide for enforcement as well as a reference for researchers and educators to aid in early detection and removal of non-native marine fish. The red lionfish, which was first documented off Florida in 1985, provides an example of what can happen once an invasive fish species becomes established. Lionfish are now widespread along the southeast US and parts of the Caribbean, preying upon ecologically-important native species such as fishes and crustaceans. REEF continues to conduct training, outreach, and field studies to limit the spread and impact of lionfish on native western Atlantic reefs.

    The illustrated guide was published as a NOAA Technical Memorandum that is available online (http://fl.biology.usgs.gov/Marine_Fish_ID/index.html). 1,300 copies were printed and are being distributed to key local, state and federal agencies. The on-line edition guide will be continuously updated with new records and reports.

    Divers and snorkelers can report non-native species that are seen underwater at REEF's Exotic Species Sighting Page.

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    Reports From the Field - 2009 Bermuda Field Survey

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    Thirteen lucky REEF members joined Anna and Ned Deloach, Judie Clee, and Chris Flook for a Field Survey to remember in Bermuda.
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    The beautiful Puddingwife, one of the largest wrasse species in the western Atlantic. Photo by Ned DeLoach.
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    Yellowhead Wrasse in Bermuda show unique coloration patterns. Photo by Ned DeLoach.
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    A teeny tiny, baby Bermuda Chub found under floating Sargassum. Photo by Ned DeLoach.

    Over eight years ago, REEF expanded its flagship Fish Survey Project into Bermuda. Since then, local surveyors have contributed over 2500 surveys to the sighting database! In October, thirteen volunteers joined local REEF hosts Judie Clee and Chris Flook for a delightfully full schedule. After two extended survey dives each day, we were treated to a night snorkel and picnic to watch glowworms, a slideshow and dinner at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, a private, guided tour of the nature preserve on Nonsuch Island, and a reception and presentations by the scientists from BREAM (Bermuda Reef Ecosystem Assessment and Mapping Programme). The week was topped off with a grand finale dinner and behind the scenes tour of the Bermuda Aquarium and Zoological Park.

    One of the best things about fishwatching is seeing something new. Many areas have endemic fish and experienced fishwatchers know that fish coloration and behaviors can vary a lot from region to region. We arrived prepared to add Bermuda Bream, Bermuda Halfbeaks and Gwelly jacks to our lifelists but found ourselves equally thrilled to see the Bermuda version of the Yellowhead wrasse, called the Redback (for its distinctive red coloration) and the brilliant jewel colors of their Puddingwives. Between dives, Chris Flook, from the Bermuda Aquarium, filled buckets with rafts of Sargassum seaweed and pointed out juvenile chubs, crabs, shrimps, pipefish and frogfish. Judie’s expert eye helped us sort out the damselfish puzzle. We dived several times in an area where the Emerald Parrotfish was once quite common but has not been seen for many years. Our possible sightings have generated some excitement and Judie and Chris are investigating further. Our total species count for the week was 115 and included a rare sighting of a Conchfish.

    Thanks go out to Triangle Diving for the welcome BBQ (and Lionfish hors d’oeuvres) and their excellent diving services. And very special thanks to the Bermuda Zoological Society for funding REEF in Bermuda and for underwriting many of our special activities of the week. We’ll be back – and promise that it won’t take eight years!

    As this report reminds us -- REEF trips are more than just your average dive vacation. Be sure to check out the REEF trip 2010 schedule, which can be found online at www.REEF.org/fieldsurveys/schedule. We encourage you to join us on our adventures in 2010 and Take a Trip the Counts!

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    News Tidbits

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  • Check Out the REEF Store! It's your one stop shop for all of your REEF Gear, ID Books and REEF Survey Supplies. Just added in the REEF Gear section -- new colors of the REEF Hat.
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  • Do you eBay? If you buy or sell on eBay, here's an easy way to support REEF as part of Giving Works. Sellers chose to donate 10-100% of the proceeds. Go to the REEF Profile page for Giving Works. From there you can check out current auction items from sellers who have chosen REEF to receive part or all of their proceeds and you can list your own auctions. Thanks to Carlton A. for recently supporting REEF this way!
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  • New Lionfish Documentary. Miami filmmaker Alicia Zaitsu has recently put together a short documentary on the lionfish in South Florida including the first capture of a lionfish in Biscayne National Park. The film is undergoing additional editing into both a shorter and longer version for distribution, but for now, the current version is available for public viewing on Youtube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYPcnQW_YZs
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  • Become a Fan of REEF on Facebook. The REEF Facebook Page gives you the latest information about REEF's programs and events, our marine conservation work, and see exclusive content and stories. It's also a great place for our members to post pictures, fish stories and whatever is on their mind.
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