Making It Count - July 2016

Where and When Are REEF Surveys Conducted

REEF Survey Project Regions

Did you know? While the REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project was started in South Florida in 1993, today it has been expanded worldwide! REEF surveys are conducted as part of a diver's regular diving activities; anytime they are in the water, in any of these regions. And more regions are coming soon.

REEF's Survey Project areas:

  • Tropical Western Atlantic (TWA; Florida, Caribbean, Bahamas, and Gulf of Mexico), 
  • South Atlantic States (SAS; Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina)
  • Northeast US & Canada (NE; Virginia through Newfoundland)
  • Eastern Atlantic & Mediterranean (EAM; Azores, Madeira, Canary Islands, Cape Verde Islands, and Mediterranean)
  • West Coast of the United States and Canada (PAC; California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia)
  • Tropical Eastern Pacific (TEP; Sea of Cortez to the Galapagos Islands).
  • Hawaiian Islands (HAW; main islands and the Northwest Hawaiian Islands)
  • South Pacific (SOP; Fiji, Samoan Archipelago, Line Islands, Cook Islands)
  • Central Indo-Pacific (CIP; Indonesia, Solomon Islands, Australia, Philippines, Hong Kong, Japan)

To find out more about the REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project, visit www.REEF.org/programs/volunteersurvey.

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Support Discoveries This Summer; Your Donation Will Be Matched

Make a donation today so that REEF staff can continue research and discovery on the impacts and solutions of the lionfish invasion in the western Atlantic. Photo by Rich Carey.

We have one week left in our summer matching campaign, and want to thank everyone who has given so far. This summer, we are highlighting all the amazing discoveries made possible by generous donations from members like you!

To make a contribution, please visit www.REEF.org/donate.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “To date, we have explored less than five percent of our oceans.” What does that mean for REEF and our members? It means that there is so much out there to discover! Every year, REEF members are finding new species, and REEF scientists are investigating the lifecycles and behaviors of critical marine species. We are constantly learning new things about ocean wildlife that contribute to their survival.

It also means that all these new discoveries can help regulatory agencies and policymakers to make more informed decisions on how to manage our fisheries. In cases like the threatened Nassau Grouper, seasonal protections during spawning seasons have been developed. In the case of invasive species, like lionfish, removal events are being encouraged because they have been proven effective at controlling lionfish populations.

Please take this opportunity to make a contribution this summer and help REEF continue to make these important discoveries that ultimately protect marine species around the world! Thank you again to all our members who support us in our mission, and have a great summer!

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“Finding Dory” and Promoting Responsible Pet Ownership

"Dory" is a Palette Surgeonfish. Photo by Efraim Stocher.

The highly-anticipated sequel to Disney and Pixar’s “Finding Nemo”, “Finding Dory” opened in theaters in June, and was recently announced to be the highest-grossing animated film of all time. The titular character, Dory, is a Palette Surgeonfish (Paracanthurus hepatic), who spends the film searching for her family. Native to the tropical waters of the Western Pacific Ocean (REEF’s Central Indo-Pacific and South Pacific regions), these bright blue, reef-dwelling, algae-eating fish are also referred to as Pacific Blue Tangs, Hippo Tangs, or Regal Tangs. In addition to the film’s endearing characters and entertainment value, the release of “Finding Dory” carries the potential for an increased demand for Palette Surgeonfish in home aquariums, as well as the message that marine fish should be released into the wild.

Marine biologists worry that the release of “Finding Dory” could cause an increased demand for Palette Surgeonfish, threatening wild populations as well as coral reef habitats. National Geographic estimates that following the release of “Finding Nemo” in 2003, the demand for Clown Anenomefish (Amphiprion percula) like Nemo, more than tripled. Anenomefish are able to be aquacultured, or bred in captivity. Until recently, Palette Surgeonfish had never successfully been captive-bred, however, researchers at the University of Florida Tropical Aquaculture Laboratory recently announced that for the first time they have successfully raised the Palette Surgeonfish in captivity. This conservation breakthrough means that aquarists may soon have a source for Palette Surgeonfish that does not rely on fish removed from the wild. REEF encourages pet owners to educate themselves about fish ownership before buying a marine fish, including specifics on living requirements such as tank size, and whether the fish was bred in captivity or caught in the wild.

In addition, pet owners should have a plan in place in case they are ever unable to care for their fish. In “Finding Dory”, we learn that Dory was born and raised in a facility on the California coast, but eventually ended up in the wild. Releasing non-native marine fish into the ocean from home aquariums, while well-intentioned, can create severe problems for marine ecosystems. One threat includes the spread of invasive species, like the Indo-Pacific Lionfish, which has caused dramatic impacts since their initial introduction in the 1980’s. Non-native fish may also carry diseases and parasites that can have harmful impacts on native fish species.

In 2015, REEF launched the “Don’t Release Me” campaign to educate pet owners about responsible pet ownership, teach the public about the effects of releasing non-native pet species into the wild, and work cooperatively with other organizations to promote alternatives to pet release and stop the spread of invasive species. To learn more about Don’t Release Me and responsible pet ownership, visit www.dontreleaseme.org.

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REEF Fest 2016: An Annual Celebration of Marine Conservation, September 29 - October 2

We hope you can join us this Fall for REEF Fest 2016 in Key Largo, Florida. The four-day celebration of marine conservation is planned for September 29 through October 2, 2016. Events include diving, eco-ventures, ocean-themed seminars, and evening socials. Make sure to visit www.REEF.org/REEFFest to register for seminars, find participating dive and eco-venture operators, and for more information on REEF Fest parties and social events. And be sure to join us on Saturday, October 1, for the Celebration Dinner Party sponsored by Divers Alert Network! The event will include hors d’oeuvres, a three-course meal, and an open liquor bar, alongside live music and a silent auction benefiting the marine conservation work of REEF. Reservations are required and tickets are available at www.REEF.org/REEFFest/dinnerticket.

REEF is excited to announce this year’s seminar line-up:

Fun Fish Facts: Little Known Facts about Life in the Sea -- Carlos and Allison Estape, REEF TWA Expert Surveyors

Sustainability Risk Assessment of Florida’s Coral Reef Fisheries -- Jerald S. Ault, Ph.D., University of Miami, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science

The Emerald Sea: REEF Surveying in the Pacific Northwest -- Janna Nichols, REEF Outreach Coordinator

The War on Lionfish: How Efforts to Combat the Invasion are Affecting Marine Conservation -- Stephanie Green, Ph.D., Stanford University Banting Fellow

The Great White Sharks of Guadalupe Island -- Dan Orr, International Scuba Diving Hall of Fame

Shifting Paradigm in the Sea -- Jack Grove, Ph.D., Marine Biologist

Sister Sanctuaries: Linking the Science and Management of Coral Reefs in Cuba and the U.S. -- Billy D. Causey, SE Regional Director, NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries

REEF Program Update -- Lad Akins, REEF Director of Special Projects

Wacky Creature Stories and Other Tales from the Sea -- Ellen Prager, Ph.D., President of Earth2Ocean Inc.

Please visit www.REEF.org/REEFfest/seminars for more details. See you in September!

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Introducing REEF Conservation Creatures

REEF Conservation Creatures are iconic marine species found throughout REEF’s nine Volunteer Fish Survey Project regions. From the Tropical Western Atlantic (TWA) to the Central Indo-Pacific (CIP), these marine creatures highlight the diversity of ocean ecosystems and encourage understanding and respect for marine life. Each plush comes with a collectable, laminated Conservation Card that provides information about the animal’s habitat, characteristics, potential threats, and global distribution in REEF's Survey Project regions.

These cuddly marine animals make the perfect educational gift for the ocean enthusiast in your life. Plushes are sold on the REEF website for $10 each, and if you buy three or more, you will receive a 15% discount. If you’d like to own all 11 Conservation Creatures, you may purchase the entire set for $88 (a savings of 20%!) You can view the entire collection online at www.REEF.org/creatures.

The REEF Conservation Creatures series includes:

Blue-spotted Ribbontail Ray

Clown Anemonefish

Common Lionfish/Invasive Red Lionfish

Giant Pacific Octopus

Green Sea Turtle

Leopard Shark

Oceanic Manta Ray

Palette Surgeonfish

Spotted Eagle Ray

Summer Flounder

Whale Shark

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Bermuda - a Unique Destination

The Grotto Bay Resort, home to the Bermuda REEF Field Survey this October.

Bermuda is at the northern extent of the Tropical Western Atlantic survey region and represents a unique destination for REEF's fish watchers. There are six spaces left on our Field Survey Trip to Bermuda (October 1-8), and this is your opportunity to dive pristine reefs, expand your knowledge of marine life, and search for elusive and beautiful fish such as the redback wrasse. Trip leaders Ned and Anna DeLoach will entertain participants with their fish identification and behavior expertise, providing engaging lectures and photographs in conjunction with educational seminars each evening. Pink sand beaches, fascinating historic sites and a blend of British Colonial and African culture help to make Bermuda, also known as the "Jewel of the Atlantic," a captivating destination for non-divers as well. Check out the full trip description at www.REEF.org/trips.

Even if you can't make the trip, be sure to join Ned and Anna online for their free Fishinar at the end of this month, August 30. See www.REEF.org/fishinars for all the details.

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